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Old 08-15-2017, 08:58 AM
Status: "I would rather die as a coward than live as a fool" (set 14 days ago)
 
140 posts, read 50,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
I went to a HS that was medium-strict. Private, Catholic High School. The rules weren't hard; follow the dress code, treat teachers with respect, don't swear. However, coming from a public middle school, the discipline was a good thing and not the easiest adjustment.

We had a uniform, but it was basically khaki pants and a shirt that came from Lands End with the logo on it. You could wear a sweater, polo, button down, sweatshirt, whatever, basically anything except a t-shirt.

We weren't allowed facial hair but most of the time, if a kid came in with it he would be sent to the dean and the dean would provide a razor and shaving cream. They might get a detention if they were snotty about it, but detention wasn't a big deal, 30 minutes sitting quietly copying something out of the handook, bible, or doing your homework if the teacher was disinterested.

Guy has a maximum hair length, collar length I think, but most of the time you would be told that you needed a haircut. If that didn't get results, they'd email your parents, but most kids had short hair as it was the style at the time.

Some kids just instinctively rebelled against it, couldn't/wouldn't conform, etc...It really never made tons of sense to me why they would get kicked out of school rather than wear a nametag.

Some teachers ran a much tighter ship in their classrooms than others, but I can only think of one that was over the top, and that was a reflection of poor classroom management skills. I think you see that at any school.

But, we were allowed autonomy on most of the school grounds. We had to smoke off the property if we wanted to, but if you smelled like cigs after lunch they wouldn't hassle you unless you were under age, and if you weren't a senior you couldn't go off campus for lunch anyway.

They did have to lock confessional doors in the chapel as kids would go there to make out or whatever.
Did it do you good or made no difference at all.

I hear people say that strict schools made them more disciplined, but I know some kids in my former Catholic school (probably in the minority) that actually became more agressive and one turned out to be a killer right after failing out of the school in his final year. Like you, he moved from a comprehensive school to a public 'Catholic' school.
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:13 AM
 
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My school was pretty strict but I didn't know that - I went to the same school district and schools all the way through. It was only until I worked in schools later on that I had enough context to gauge that it was on the strict end of the spectrum.
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
4,778 posts, read 3,544,073 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by croftylot24 View Post
Did it do you good or made no difference at all.

I hear people say that strict schools made them more disciplined, but I know some kids in my former Catholic school (probably in the minority) that actually became more agressive and one turned out to be a killer right after failing out of the school in his final year. Like you, he moved from a comprehensive school to a public 'Catholic' school.
It did me good. The extra structure helped me quite a bit. It isn't as if it "taught me discipline" that's carried me through into adult years, but it did help me succeed in the moment, and better prepared me academically for college. As my mother said, I was "drifting" and she felt I would fall through the cracks at the public HS, as I wasn't a true delinquent that would get the attention of the school, and was intelligent enough to get through without exerting effort.

There were parents that sent kids that were much more delinquent to our school. They didn't last. One kid beat another kid with his football helmet, then a month later punched a classmate in the face during Mass. He was expelled. Another was caught going through his teammates gym bags stealing their wallets, he was expelled.

There are a couple of kids that went down a criminal path after college. One of them dealt drugs and ended up with an attempted murder conviction, another ended up doing prison time for a sex crime, but that's under five kids in a class of 315. I don't think it would have mattered where they were educated; my brother went to the public school and saw a similar few kids that ended up making really bad decisions. But, we had a good public high school, in a nice neighborhood. The schools were good.

That being said, at my HS, there were a fair amount of kids that came from bad neighborhoods or were zoned into schools with a lot of problems. Their parents sacrificed to send them to school. They didn't want their kids exposed to a criminal element, gang violence, drug culture, that one saw at their local public schools. They all seemed to go down the "right path," most of them going to college but a few going into the military and a few that started their own businesses in the trades. I don't know how much of that is the result of the school and how much is the result of parents that invested in them and placed a value on education.
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Old 08-15-2017, 11:46 AM
Status: "I would rather die as a coward than live as a fool" (set 14 days ago)
 
140 posts, read 50,784 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
It did me good. The extra structure helped me quite a bit. It isn't as if it "taught me discipline" that's carried me through into adult years, but it did help me succeed in the moment, and better prepared me academically for college. As my mother said, I was "drifting" and she felt I would fall through the cracks at the public HS, as I wasn't a true delinquent that would get the attention of the school, and was intelligent enough to get through without exerting effort.
Hmm....academically and/or just starting to hang out with the bad crowd? Did your mother worry you would become an average middle class kid to a softcore/hardcore drug dealer?

I kind of get the feel of what you mean by drifting. My teachers in secondary school were awe-struck at how our year was specifically how guys who were successful in the Junior Cycle were either performing at a mediocre standard, quite poorly, or failing.

My year apparently had teachers who were so concerned, that they had to remove an Advanced French and Maths class because for the first time ever, they needed to reallocate resources that they believed would be wasted on lazy students.
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Old 08-15-2017, 12:30 PM
 
329 posts, read 149,510 times
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It's really a generational thing. I went to Catholic school from the 1st though the 8th grade plus the first year of high school. I went to public school from then on. Grammar school was in the 1950's so the teachers (nuns through grade 7) and Irish Christian Brothers (in the 8th grade). relied heavily on hitting the students (mostly a hard slap across the face by the nuns, or sticking your chewing gum in your pompador and cutting the pompador off at the end of class), though the brothers did escalate from a hard slap in the face to punches in the arm, knees in the thigh, and 10 strikes with a wooden dowel across the fingertips) for any infraction includng talking in the hall while going to chapel or talking in the school bus when silence was declared. The funny thing is no one I knew (either students or parents) actually resented or complained about this treatment, we all thought it was perfectly fair and a correct consequence of violating the rules. Of course in those days we boys beat each other in fist fights regularly, so we inflicted more damage than the teachers did. And I suppose that compared to burning in hell for all eternity, this was considered as mildly corrective punishment. In high school we had a different order of brothers and so no one was ever hit or physically punished to my recollection. Of course the fist fights continued among the students. And the high school was in a wealthy neighborhood (I commuted from downown LA by suburban Greyhound). One of the boys in my class in the 9th grade was James Roosevelt, the grandson of FDR, so maybe that is why the students were treated differently than I and others had been in grammar school.
All in all I would say it did me good. We were brought up on cowboys and Indians movies and WWII and Korean War movies, so there was a sense of pride in being able to take a punch whether from another kid or from a teacher, of not backing down, of breaking the rules and taking your punishment if you got caught. Nobody complained. We were all a bunch of little tough guys who went to confession on Saturday and mass on Sunday.

Last edited by bobspez; 08-15-2017 at 12:46 PM..
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Old 08-15-2017, 01:54 PM
Status: "Please tell me what to do. Ha ha ha." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Big Island of Hawaii
877 posts, read 235,247 times
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12 years of catholic school in the US. in the '60s and '70s.

mandatory uniforms; as a girl, I had to wear a pleated wool skirt every day, in 100-degree heat or sleety rain. And the skirt, cotton blouse, and taffeta tie all had to be ironed every morning. 3 different temps on the iron, woe to you if you used the cotton setting on the taffeta tie (it melted).

mandatory confession. every week. My standard confession: "Father, I lied to my parents and hit my brother."

The nuns were much harder on the boys than the girls. Yes, ruler swats, but also hair pulling (one clever guy greased his hair to disgust the nasty nun). And once, a nun pushed/threw a boy so hard against a cupboard, the door fell off.

Segregated playgrounds. Girls over here, boys over there. Then they built a new church on the girls' playground, moved all the play structures to the boys' playground, and the girls could only play on the paved parking lot. I wonder if they ever changed that.
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Old 08-15-2017, 02:49 PM
 
Location: Kalamalka Lake, B.C.
2,516 posts, read 3,225,883 times
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When mutton chops were becoming a trend my high school used the PE teachers to dry shave them off, when other high schools in our LA systems were allowing mustaches. The same razor was deliberately left very dull, and was used on all the students. (uh, First Aid and medical procedures???)

Today this is considered FELONY assault and these nimrods would be looking along with the Principal. ALSO a PE coach, doing hard time in a California prison.
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Old 08-15-2017, 03:30 PM
 
2,649 posts, read 956,840 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by steiconi View Post
12 years of catholic school in the US. in the '60s and '70s.

mandatory uniforms; as a girl, I had to wear a pleated wool skirt every day, in 100-degree heat or sleety rain. And the skirt, cotton blouse, and taffeta tie all had to be ironed every morning. 3 different temps on the iron, woe to you if you used the cotton setting on the taffeta tie (it melted).

mandatory confession. every week. My standard confession: "Father, I lied to my parents and hit my brother."

The nuns were much harder on the boys than the girls. Yes, ruler swats, but also hair pulling (one clever guy greased his hair to disgust the nasty nun). And once, a nun pushed/threw a boy so hard against a cupboard, the door fell off.

Segregated playgrounds. Girls over here, boys over there. Then they built a new church on the girls' playground, moved all the play structures to the boys' playground, and the girls could only play on the paved parking lot. I wonder if they ever changed that.
Thank you for such a defined time in your schooling. I plum forgot about the segregated play yards!
The uniforms...Yes indeed! Proper ironing of the pleats, maybe that's why I love to iron.
Love your weekly confessional.
The nuns were brutal...Sadly. strangely our principal never laid a hand on us.she was a nun ,but carried her ire in her eyes. She had a look that sent shame thru the pores! I thought she was stunning too! Beautiful chestnut hair,tall.and graceful, porcelain skin tone....
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Old 08-15-2017, 05:34 PM
Status: "Don't join dangerous cults. Practice safe sects!" (set 25 days ago)
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
2,661 posts, read 3,855,871 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Thank you for such a defined time in your schooling. I plum forgot about the segregated play yards!
The uniforms...Yes indeed! Proper ironing of the pleats, maybe that's why I love to iron.
Love your weekly confessional.
The nuns were brutal...Sadly. strangely our principal never laid a hand on us.she was a nun ,but carried her ire in her eyes. She had a look that sent shame thru the pores! I thought she was stunning too! Beautiful chestnut hair,tall.and graceful, porcelain skin tone....

Our grade school principal was very tough and intimidating looking too. She had long dark hair flowing down her back. None on her head, just flowing down her back.
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Old 08-15-2017, 06:07 PM
 
403 posts, read 168,190 times
Reputation: 1363
Back in the day when I was in school, it was strict. This was a public school in the 50s/60s. You'd get paddled on your butt or have your hands smacked with a ruler until they bled, whatever the teacher preferred for punishment. Our skirt length was checked regularly...when down on our knees the hem had to touch the floor, and no pants were allowed of course, back then. No talking, no gum chewing. We didn't talk back to the teachers. If caught passing notes, we'd have to go to the front of the room and read the notes out loud, then we'd get sent to the principal's office for punishment. Actually, we'd get sent to the principal's office for pretty much any reason.

We behaved.

Last edited by oldgardener; 08-15-2017 at 06:23 PM..
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