U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 08-14-2017, 02:32 PM
 
146 posts, read 56,306 times
Reputation: 191

Advertisements

I always read some article on Yahoo US about some inane school policy introduced or enforced by the administration and people here in Europe say that schools there have gone insane whereas when I look at some aspects of school here in the UK and Ireland like school uniforms, I think my American counterpart cousins had it easier in some aspects.

I went to a secondary school that I hated a lot..well perhaps i should focus more on my complete lack of any relationships in school due to me being seen as the weirdest person rather than the actual school itself but the rules did suck a lot.

What's very interesting is that there is not really a ranking of 'strictness' of schools, it something that you really just have to infer from talking to parents of others schools since some parents/students don't mind it. For some students it can be great and for others, it can be a nightmare.

My school was a quasi-Catholic school in Ireland that didn't beat you since school punishment was and is illegal but to put it this way, even though the teachers and students weren't religious, the main non-religious 'tenants' of strictness that Catholics generally share in life was exercised by many teachers. People even criticized their desire to expel students for a Facebook post about teachers that they wrote in their own time.

Interestingly, the students there suffered a form of what I'd call Stockholm Syndrome where they looked down at students from other lax schools (very minor things that they would consider disobedience). They weren't physically violent but both teachers and students were definitelyemotionally and verbally agressive to the point of abuse.

Getting out there helped me a lot.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 08-14-2017, 08:10 PM
 
4,044 posts, read 1,896,310 times
Reputation: 9832
I was from a different era. Our school rules were pretty lax compared to today. Basically no shorts except in PE, don't talk back to teachers, no cheating, do your work, no fighting. Funny thing is we had really good discipline. Students might do something, get punished, then back to class, no hard feelings. No sexually harassing the cheerleaders, even though they wore skirts so short ..., well short. That was easily enforced since most of them dated players on the football team anyway or you were in class with their brother who took care of that problem. (That no fighting rule didn't apply off school grounds.)


We carried pocket knives. During hunting season most of the trucks in the high school parking lot had guns in the back window. There was student smoking area. Legal drinking age was 18, so there were two punch bowels at the prom, one spiked, the other not. Even then the only rule on drinking at the prom was the highway patrol had a checkpoint at the end of the parking lot, so if you drink, don't drive.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-14-2017, 10:05 PM
 
2,817 posts, read 1,031,359 times
Reputation: 6738
Nine years private school. Strict and respectable. From uniforms to proper manners, we were guided to study, adhere and be responsible.

Was a Rude awakening when I arrived at public school level. The students ran the nuthouse....Few respected the education system and for the most part...the teachers had been out numbered.

I maintained a regard for education and must have seemed "odd" since I actually respected my teachers and my classmates...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 05:08 AM
 
192 posts, read 50,980 times
Reputation: 236
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I was from a different era. Our school rules were pretty lax compared to today. Basically no shorts except in PE, don't talk back to teachers, no cheating, do your work, no fighting. Funny thing is we had really good discipline. Students might do something, get punished, then back to class, no hard feelings. No sexually harassing the cheerleaders, even though they wore skirts so short ..., well short. That was easily enforced since most of them dated players on the football team anyway or you were in class with their brother who took care of that problem. (That no fighting rule didn't apply off school grounds.)


We carried pocket knives. During hunting season most of the trucks in the high school parking lot had guns in the back window. There was student smoking area. Legal drinking age was 18, so there were two punch bowels at the prom, one spiked, the other not. Even then the only rule on drinking at the prom was the highway patrol had a checkpoint at the end of the parking lot, so if you drink, don't drive.
A common sentiment then was, "Let them smoke cigarettes and drink beer so that they don't turn to weed, acid, crack, or heroin."
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 06:48 AM
 
146 posts, read 56,306 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by Nov3 View Post
Nine years private school. Strict and respectable. From uniforms to proper manners, we were guided to study, adhere and be responsible.

Was a Rude awakening when I arrived at public school level. The students ran the nuthouse....Few respected the education system and for the most part...the teachers had been out numbered.

I maintained a regard for education and must have seemed "odd" since I actually respected my teachers and my classmates...
Where did you go to school (country/region/city)?

I wonder what makes a certain school strict while another one is lax in the same socio-economic area. That was the case for me.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 06:50 AM
 
146 posts, read 56,306 times
Reputation: 191
Quote:
Originally Posted by redguitar77111 View Post
A common sentiment then was, "Let them smoke cigarettes and drink beer so that they don't turn to weed, acid, crack, or heroin."
The irony of that statement. I don't know what education they received but weed and acid have been proven to be safer than cigarettes and beer (physical health perhaps mental health is another question).
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 07:37 AM
 
4,044 posts, read 1,896,310 times
Reputation: 9832
Actually that was not the sentiment. The sentiment was school was not your mama and 18 was a legal adult plus the legal smoking age was lower so it wasn't the school's business if you smoked or drank so long as it was legal. And there want this desire to criminalize everything when a simple swat across the seat would do.

Basically kids self reported most of their own big violations (like breaking a window) and the punishment was to work it off. This taught self responsibility and didn't create crimes out of stupid teenage actions. We are in way too much of a hurry to make a Federal case, so to speak, out of what should be teachable moments so that kids can make a mistake and learn from it so they become good adult citizens.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 07:39 AM
 
Location: Virginia
7,344 posts, read 11,031,496 times
Reputation: 3090
I guess ours were pretty strict. In grades 1-4 we weren't allowed to talk during lunch and had to sit boy/girl. If you were caught saying anything you found yourself standing in the corner with your nose against the wall. The principal paddled. Most teachers were strict with their discipline. I had a second grade teacher who would turn student desks over and empty them out when she got angry. She would also rap knuckles with a ruler. I had another who would make students stand in front of the class with arms outstretched holding heavy books.

In high school boys were not allows to have "excessive" facial hair or wear earrings. They were very strict on girls' skirt length and cheerleaders had to wear sweatpants or some type of pant under their skirt while at school. No public displays of affection were allowed, which included holding hands. If you drove to school you had a certain number of seconds before you had to exit your car and go to either the cafeteria or gym prior to the first bell. The principal would stand in the parking lot with a stopwatch. Some tried smoking in the bathroom. The admin chained the doors shut which left only the bathrooms near the school office. When the smoking moved outside the police were called.

This was a public school district. I'm sure there were a number of other rules I could think of still.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 07:56 AM
 
Location: StlNoco Mo
4,024 posts, read 2,803,512 times
Reputation: 5717
I didn't go to Catholic school long but I do remember wearing those stupid clothes, couldn't wait to get home and put on regular clothes.
We moved around a lot so I went to many public schools and each one seemed to have their own set of rules. When I was in California I had to go to this summer school for six weeks and this teacher laid out all the rules for us on the first day, " There'll be no talking, no cussing, no gum chewing, no farting, no nose picking, no laughing, and anyone who is not in their desk when the bell rings will spend the night in the box." I think that teacher watched too many movies.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 08-15-2017, 08:36 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
4,870 posts, read 3,644,572 times
Reputation: 6112
I went to a HS that was medium-strict. Private, Catholic High School. The rules weren't hard; follow the dress code, treat teachers with respect, don't swear. However, coming from a public middle school, the discipline was a good thing and not the easiest adjustment.

We had a uniform, but it was basically khaki pants and a shirt that came from Lands End with the logo on it. You could wear a sweater, polo, button down, sweatshirt, whatever, basically anything except a t-shirt.

We weren't allowed facial hair but most of the time, if a kid came in with it he would be sent to the dean and the dean would provide a razor and shaving cream. They might get a detention if they were snotty about it, but detention wasn't a big deal, 30 minutes sitting quietly copying something out of the handook, bible, or doing your homework if the teacher was disinterested.

Guy has a maximum hair length, collar length I think, but most of the time you would be told that you needed a haircut. If that didn't get results, they'd email your parents, but most kids had short hair as it was the style at the time.

Some kids just instinctively rebelled against it, couldn't/wouldn't conform, etc...It really never made tons of sense to me why they would get kicked out of school rather than wear a nametag.

Some teachers ran a much tighter ship in their classrooms than others, but I can only think of one that was over the top, and that was a reflection of poor classroom management skills. I think you see that at any school.

But, we were allowed autonomy on most of the school grounds. We had to smoke off the property if we wanted to, but if you smelled like cigs after lunch they wouldn't hassle you unless you were under age, and if you weren't a senior you couldn't go off campus for lunch anyway.

They did have to lock confessional doors in the chapel as kids would go there to make out or whatever.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 05:15 AM.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top