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Old 08-17-2017, 05:17 AM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
96 posts, read 40,275 times
Reputation: 93

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
They should have a school nurse or other assigned person to deal with health issues. Get a letter from your child's doctor specifying his allergies, his physical reactions when exposed to said allergens, and recommended reasonable accommodations. Allow the nurse to fix the issue with the teacher, that is part of her job and it doesn't set you up to start the year clashing with the teacher. The school may suggest your child be placed on a 504 plan, and if your child's allergies are that bad you want him on one anyway.

Your child should be able to eat an apple at snack time, that would definitely be considered a reasonable accomadation.
His school system doesn't employ a nurse, but I will look into a 504 plan. After reading this I'm curious as to why after the 2nd or 3rd ER visit follow up his pediatrician failed to ever mention this document...she fought me for months over an epi pen rx!
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Old 08-17-2017, 05:21 AM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
96 posts, read 40,275 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by tronese View Post
We just moved here this summer. Before she went to kindergarten, I took her to an allergist and got her peanut/tree nut allergy added to her medical history. The school should have forms for you to fill out and you should meet with the school's nurse to discuss a plan to keep your child safe. We had a great nurse before and the one now seems pretty good too. She even said there is a form I could fill out to have a modified meal available for my child if she chose to buy a lunch.

Her classroom is a tree nut/peanut free zone. For lunch, they have a designated table (at both schools) for those with food allergies. At her last school, everyone who entered the class used sanitizing wipes. Snacks were brought individually. If snacks were brought in for the whole class (i.e. for a birthday), it had to come through the nurse's office and she would confirm if it was okay.

Make sure all is documented as far as your child's allergy and definitely meet with the school nurse and your child's teacher. I did this before school began. There should be a plan to prevent an incident and a plan in case exposure does happen.
I'm going to assume you live in a larger city... this is so wonderful to hear, schools being able to openly accommodate children with allergies! The district is so small 5th through 12th grades are in one building.
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Old 08-17-2017, 05:24 AM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
96 posts, read 40,275 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Two things come to mind. If he is that allergic to cleaning supplies, can you home school him the first year or two until he develops more of a resistance to the chemicals? Sometimes kids can outgrow allergies.

Secondly, if this isn't an option, what about just making sure he has a big breakfast to tide him over until lunch? Is missing a snack for a kid that big a deal?
No it's not but it's indicated on the daily schedule as a 20 minute snacktime... that's a while to just sit there watching them eat and not be able to.
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Old 08-17-2017, 07:34 AM
 
1,630 posts, read 526,504 times
Reputation: 4666
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
His school system doesn't employ a nurse, but I will look into a 504 plan. After reading this I'm curious as to why after the 2nd or 3rd ER visit follow up his pediatrician failed to ever mention this document...she fought me for months over an epi pen rx!
I'm struggling with this.

Can you give more details about why your child's pediatrician, on follow up from the 3rd ER visit for an allergic reaction, would fight you for months about getting an EPI pen Rx?

It's baffling that a teacher wouldn't care about a child who wanted to bring an apple during snack time instead of risk food allergies, but then when the child's pediatrician also refuses to accommodate the child's allergies after 3 documented visits to the ER, it becomes even more baffling.

So I'm going to suggest there's more going on here than you are stating in your posts.
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Old 08-17-2017, 07:49 AM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
3,508 posts, read 3,770,074 times
Reputation: 6737
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
No it's not but it's indicated on the daily schedule as a 20 minute snacktime... that's a while to just sit there watching them eat and not be able to.
I am not a teacher but I do work within a school, grades K-8. Kids do get hungry during the course of the day, and they love snack-time. Every grade in my school has a designated snack-time. Kids need the fuel to get through the school day, so it's not unreasonable that they'd like to have a snack outside of the regular lunch time.

Our students bring in their own individual snack so I find it odd that parents are responsible for providing a snack for the whole class on a regular basis.

What I especially find odd is that the teacher is refusing to accommodate a child's allergy, and that the teacher is okay with this child being ostracized. That would definitely be unacceptable in my school.

Last edited by HokieFan; 08-17-2017 at 08:26 AM..
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Old 08-17-2017, 08:18 AM
 
Location: Bloomington, IL
9,137 posts, read 4,332,201 times
Reputation: 19376
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
His school system doesn't employ a nurse, but I will look into a 504 plan. After reading this I'm curious as to why after the 2nd or 3rd ER visit follow up his pediatrician failed to ever mention this document...she fought me for months over an epi pen rx!
So the ER visits were not over reactions on your part fearing a life-threatening allergic reaction that you've not actually seen in the past? These are truly strong reactions and not food sensitivities? I'm thinking that is one explanation for your doctor's hesitation to give you an epi pen.
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Old 08-17-2017, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Charlotte Area
2,651 posts, read 2,311,489 times
Reputation: 2718
Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
Two things come to mind. If he is that allergic to cleaning supplies, can you home school him the first year or two until he develops more of a resistance to the chemicals? Sometimes kids can outgrow allergies.

Secondly, if this isn't an option, what about just making sure he has a big breakfast to tide him over until lunch? Is missing a snack for a kid that big a deal?
When my daughter was in Kindergarten, they didn't eat until 12:30 or 12:40. They were the last lunch. They got on the bus at 7:45am.
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Old 08-17-2017, 09:36 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
27,786 posts, read 33,326,279 times
Reputation: 33576
OP, has your son been to an allergist yet? That would be a next step even without the school piece. I'm surprised your pediatrician didn't do a referral instead of being the one to authorize the Epi-Pen®.
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:33 AM
 
Location: Retired in Malibu/La Quinta/Flagstaff
995 posts, read 989,640 times
Reputation: 2683
Besides the 504 plan, ask the school administrator to review the school's MSDS. That is an OSHA required set of documents detailing the chemicals/cleaners used on the campus.
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Old 08-17-2017, 11:50 AM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
96 posts, read 40,275 times
Reputation: 93
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
OP, has your son been to an allergist yet? That would be a next step even without the school piece. I'm surprised your pediatrician didn't do a referral instead of being the one to authorize the Epi-Pen®.
My insurance required prior authorizations; the referral took about 3m, we still don't have an appointment with an allergist. His pediatrician will not address any allergens at her office..

Snack time ends after K, which will be a welcome, he isn't even allowed to bring in his own crayons. That's how stringent the school system has become!
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