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Old 08-17-2017, 10:22 PM
 
166 posts, read 115,225 times
Reputation: 238

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lbjen View Post
I'm revising my post because I just saw that your son has an epi-pen and he's going to be attending a school that doesn't have a nurse. This is a big red flag for me. I would seriously be considering other options if I were you.

Allergies of this level should have been brought to the attention of the school at the time you were registering him, they may have had a better classroom to put him in with a teacher more familiar with how to handle situations like this.

I recommend going to the school and asking to speak with the administration about the situation. Make it clear that you are willing to do any extra work necessary to make sure they are not burdened in any way, and be nice but firm.

What state are you in that they still employ a nurse at the elementary level? My children have attended schools in 2 states and neither had a nurse. The nurse is now the office secretary with a few band aids at her disposal...

The classrooms have also been nut free, dairy free and no one is allowed to bring in anything edible for birthdays. The schools bend over backwards to accommodate the allergy victims.

If I were the original poster I would kindly address the situation with the teacher again- maybe she misunderstood, and just have the kid bring the apple. If it becomes a bigger problem, then go to the principle. You are just starting school and will be at the elementary level for many years, there is no reason to go in with guns blazing (threatening people w/ lawsuits). Stay calm.
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:27 PM
 
Location: Saint Louis
7,992 posts, read 4,854,734 times
Reputation: 13528
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rothwells mum View Post
What state are you in that they still employ a nurse at the elementary level? My children have attended schools in 2 states and neither had a nurse. The nurse is now the office secretary with a few band aids at her disposal
Where do you live where they don't have school nurses? I've never heard of such a thing. All the school districts here have a school nurse, even in the elementary schools.
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:39 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
3,418 posts, read 4,080,039 times
Reputation: 4186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
Where do you live where they don't have school nurses? I've never heard of such a thing. All the school districts here have a school nurse, even in the elementary schools.
I went to school in a fairly wealthy, top ranking district in the 80s and 90s. We didn't have a nurse then. I've never known of a single school in Michigan to ever have a nurse- since I started kindergarten in the late 80s through now.

When I taught in North Carolina, we had a nurse. For a half day every Tuesday. She had 12 schools. She rarely interacted with students. She basically did paperwork all day.

Last edited by jaynarie; 08-17-2017 at 10:53 PM..
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Old 08-17-2017, 10:53 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
3,418 posts, read 4,080,039 times
Reputation: 4186
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lbjen View Post
And how many children with life-threatening allergies do you have?
I cannot conceive a child naturally, so that number would be zero. Thanks for the question.

Anyway, part of my teacher education program required me to be certified as a medical first responder. I had to take several classes, and through college my CPR and First Aid certifications were current. I kept both current during my first few years teaching. I've taught a couple children with severe allergies, and I am confident that I would have been able to handle any emergency. One of my students was severely allergic to bees. Honestly, even with a hypothetical nurse on campus, by the time the nurse would reach the playground, it would likely be too late.

I'm pretty offended that you think an educated professional, who has to be trained any time they have a student in their classroom with special medical needs, is somehow unqualified to handle a crisis.
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Old 08-17-2017, 11:16 PM
 
166 posts, read 115,225 times
Reputation: 238
Quote:
Originally Posted by Sundaydrive00 View Post
Where do you live where they don't have school nurses? I've never heard of such a thing. All the school districts here have a school nurse, even in the elementary schools.
Michigan / California
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Old 08-18-2017, 01:44 AM
 
Location: The World
2,530 posts, read 1,321,165 times
Reputation: 6186
Quote:
Originally Posted by mSooner View Post
As a mom to a rising kindergartener, I really don't get why the snack thing is an issue for the school to accomodate. Food allergies are a common issue now. I want to know if my daughter has any in her class so I can not send PBJ sandwiches, etc.

I was wondering if the cleaning supplies was a "My son will not be exposed to chemical products for his health, here are his Norwex cloths and essential oil thieves spray" situation and I would truly roll my eyes at that
. But I get orange oil. That's a tough one.
Ugh..I was waiting for and wondering about this too.
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Old 08-18-2017, 01:50 AM
 
Location: The World
2,530 posts, read 1,321,165 times
Reputation: 6186
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I'm struggling with this.

Can you give more details about why your child's pediatrician, on follow up from the 3rd ER visit for an allergic reaction, would fight you for months about getting an EPI pen Rx?

It's baffling that a teacher wouldn't care about a child who wanted to bring an apple during snack time instead of risk food allergies, but then when the child's pediatrician also refuses to accommodate the child's allergies after 3 documented visits to the ER, it becomes even more baffling.

So I'm going to suggest there's more going on here than you are stating in your posts.
Yeah, me too.

Quote:
Originally Posted by LLCNYC View Post
+1. Add in not actually seeing an allergy doc.
Yeah, weird...particularly if the allergy is THIS severe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lbjen View Post
And how many children with life-threatening allergies do you have?
I'm wondering if the OP's child's allergies are actually life-threatening, considering that the pediatrician didn't want to write a prescription for an epi-pen.
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Old 08-18-2017, 05:07 AM
 
Location: NoVA
13,027 posts, read 8,165,551 times
Reputation: 16251
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkmax View Post
Yeah, me too.



Yeah, weird...particularly if the allergy is THIS severe.


I'm wondering if the OP's child's allergies are actually life-threatening, considering that the pediatrician didn't want to write a prescription for an epi-pen.
Allergies can be severe without being life threatening. A child eating something that makes them barf or have almost uncontrollable diarrhea is still a big problem that should be avoided in a school. It is even in everyone's best interest for a student to be permitted to avoid food that just gives a mild headache and/or makes the child sleepy or hyperactive. Doctors are somewhat hesitant to prescribe epi-pens because taking them, especially when not needed, can result in physical side effects that can be dangerous themselves. It doesn't mean the child doesn't have serious problems related to the food, just non-life threatening.

However, please keep in mind that life threatening is not the bar that must to be jumped for the school to need to REASONABLY accommodate the child. Asking for your child to be able to eat an apple, supplied by you, instead of whatever odd snack item is the handed out to the entire class is a reasonable request - actually, it's reasonable regardless of the parent's reason. There is no reason the teacher can't send a letter home offering to allow parents to provide an alternative snack from a list of 4-5 select items, with emphasis that it must be in a way that does not create disruption. I was always a stickler for avoiding special snowflake situations and generally insisted that classroom routines be followed, but there are times when flexibity is required because it is the best interest of the child. This is one of those situations.

All that said, there are multiple ways this parent can approach the issue, some of which will create hard feeling from the teacher or school, some of which will inspire a cooperative effort. The parent needs to do this in a way that won't put her in the PITA parent Hall of Fame at the very beginning of the year, let alone her child's time in the school.
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Old 08-18-2017, 05:23 AM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
98 posts, read 44,472 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by JanND View Post
You are referencing an IEP. Likely Mom hasn't gotten to that point since son is just starting K. I'm also not sure that food allergies are a disability like ADD or a learning disability is.

But, I agree, I think allowing this child to eat an apple is certainly a reasonable request. Mom/OP should go to the principle and discuss this situation, since teacher already denied the request for the apple treat. The principle can determine there should be an exception. The more people aware of her child's food allergies the better in this sitting.

I am actually a bit worried that the teacher was so quick to say No.....it makes me wonder if Mom has fully conveyed the allergy concerns or was hesitant to do so.

One thing that I learned when my son, who was diagnosed with learning disabilities in 2nd grade...Was I was his first line of defense in the educational system. We were very lucky, our school system is very knowledgeable and supportive.....not all schools or teachers are.

OP/Mom Why not start a parent support group related to this issue at your son's school. Parent support groups can be amazing help.

OP here is a great link that will help you going forward to advocate for your child's safety in school.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Food_A...ch_&_Education
Good advice. I'm an introvert and shy
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Old 08-18-2017, 05:26 AM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
98 posts, read 44,472 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rothwells mum View Post
Michigan / California
Michigan.. 'school nurses' are the Secretary/ Principle.
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