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Old 08-21-2017, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Back in the Mitten. Formerly NC
3,284 posts, read 4,015,999 times
Reputation: 3935

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Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
They are teachers, not nurses!!!!!..unless a teacher has a medical license they are NOT allowed to make any medical decisions...half would panic half would just stare..one might call an ambulance..I know within 15 seconds his first dose of benadryl should be taken. I doubt he'd even be allowed to take a dose...the nearest ER is 20 miles away and it's a scary thought...
A. This is the second time you've quote that post, which wasn't even in response to you.

B. If your child's allergy is that severe, they should have been to an allergist a long time ago. Which, you've said they have not. So.... there are some issues with your story.

C. If you do want to quote my post that isn't even directed at you, let's talk about it. An EMT is not a nurse. Are they not capable of saving your child's life? My post you quoted said I went through the certification to be a medical first responder. It was a requirement in my teaching program. I'm not an idiot who just walked in off the street. Additionally, I've been certified, and re-certified, in first aid and CPR as well. Actually, I've taught CPR classes for the AHA! In addition to the fact that in every district I've worked in, if I had a child with an Epi-Pen, I had to go through a mandatory training on it. Which means I was trained almost every year in my career.
Teachers, by nature, are not the type to stand and panic. Teachers multi-task better than probably any profession. They are always watching, monitoring. They are observant. They also react quickly. ALL character traits of teachers. Teachers aren't in their profession for their paychecks- trust me- the paychecks suck. They aren't going to stand by while a child is suffering. They are going to act. Even if they don't know the child.
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Old 08-21-2017, 02:40 PM
 
Location: Location: Location
5,880 posts, read 6,486,502 times
Reputation: 15832
Quote:
Originally Posted by theatergypsy View Post
This is excellent advice.

If I may add, please don't discuss your concerns within earshot of your son. It may frighten him to think that once in school, he could come in contact with something that could have a deleterious effect on him and you won't be there to protect him.
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
No this is bad advice. He knows his allergies and is well aware. We openly discuss everything since he is the only one responsible after he leaves my protection. I cannot expect his teacher to take the time to make sure every environment is safe...by him knowing what to look for or how to respond is proactive, and could potentially save his life.
No, this is good advice based on your hysteria that the teacher isn't equipped to deal with your child. Of course your child should know the consequences if he eats something to which he has a bad reaction. He should also know that the person who is responsible to begin his formal education is not an idiot and that Mom will take care of informing the proper people that he needs Special Attention, along with the other 29 children in his classroom.

I'm considering that since this is his first time leaving your protection, it shouldn't be with the feeling that no one else will do it. He's six.
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Old 08-22-2017, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Watervliet, NY
1,582 posts, read 368,107 times
Reputation: 2551
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
They are teachers, not nurses!!!!!..unless a teacher has a medical license they are NOT allowed to make any medical decisions...half would panic half would just stare..one might call an ambulance..I know within 15 seconds his first dose of benadryl should be taken. I doubt he'd even be allowed to take a dose...the nearest ER is 20 miles away and it's a scary thought...
Are you even familiar with First Aid/CPR certification???? Anyone can go through the training courses and get certified, and that certification qualifies them to offer assistance in the event of a medical emergency, like if someone starts choking, or is in a car accident and gets injured in the process. It wouldn't be such a bad idea for more teachers to become certified in First Aid and CPR.

People who get certified and wind up having to use that training aren't "making medical decisions," and they do have to ask the victim if they want assistance (and back off if the person says they don't, although they can still call 911). But trying to stop the bleeding from an open wound, or stabilize/splint a possibly injured ankle are not things that require a medical degree to do.
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Old 08-23-2017, 02:55 AM
 
Location: NoVA
12,974 posts, read 8,100,113 times
Reputation: 16107
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
They are teachers, not nurses!!!!!..unless a teacher has a medical license they are NOT allowed to make any medical decisions...half would panic half would just stare..one might call an ambulance..I know within 15 seconds his first dose of benadryl should be taken. I doubt he'd even be allowed to take a dose...the nearest ER is 20 miles away and it's a scary thought...
Ey-yi-yi....... it is going to be a loooong year for you and his teacher.

Teachers are trained in epi-pens when they get a child in possession of one and most teachers by nature do respond well in crisis mode. Those teachers that don't, and admittedly there are some, are well aware of which teachers in nearby rooms do and will quickly send a different child to fetch them when needed. Assuming your child's allergies are that critical, yours is not the first child the school will have that has medical needs that can descend into an emergency - diabetic and asthmatic children are in no short supply.
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Old 08-23-2017, 03:32 AM
 
Location: NoVA
12,974 posts, read 8,100,113 times
Reputation: 16107
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
No this is bad advice. He knows his allergies and is well aware. We openly discuss everything since he is the only one responsible after he leaves my protection. I cannot expect his teacher to take the time to make sure every environment is safe...by him knowing what to look for or how to respond is proactive, and could potentially save his life.
They weren't referring to your concerns about his allergens, of course he should be well aware of them in order to proactively avoid them. It is actually critically important that he, of all people, know these things. They are referring to your feeling about his teacher or your opinion that his teacher is not doing the right thing. Don't set your child up for an unpleasant year by making him aware you think his teacher is incompetent or unreasonable - he is likely to not respect his teacher, or may even dislike her, strictly based on how you talk about her and that never goes well for the child.
__________________
When I post in bold red that is moderator action and, per the TOS, can only be discussed through Direct Message.
Helpful links: TOS and FAQ
Why did the moderator.....? A little about deletions and infractions
Moderator - Asia, Kentucky, Lexington, and Louisville
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Old 09-09-2017, 07:59 PM
 
Location: Washingtax
200 posts, read 44,333 times
Reputation: 433
First, DON'T sue or make a legal case out of it.

2. Pack the apple. Have a little private talk with the teacher after school telling her that he is to eat it for his snack time and that if she has an issue with it, well hard luck for her. You're the parent. He's your child, it's your tax money and it's your right to have the final say. Instruct the child to tell you if the teacher continues doing like she's doing. If you can, volunteer a couple days as a "class helper" as it were (do they even still do that these days?) before you say or do anything.

3. If you just can't make any progress with the teacher, take it up with the principal. (isn't cooperation one of the "life values" they're supposed to be teaching children in K? How ironic.) The school is legally responsible to provide the child a safe and healthy learning environment, which includes accomodations for special diets and allergies. Keep moving up the chain of command up to the district superintendant if you absolutely have to. Hopefully you won't.

4. If that still doesn't accomplish anything, sue. You'll win.

Last edited by Ttark; 09-09-2017 at 08:44 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 08:30 AM
 
Location: Mid South Central TX
3,108 posts, read 6,711,485 times
Reputation: 1994
The OP hasn't responded for quite a while. Either the issue was resolved, or the issue was not as big as OP stated. Hopefully the OP followed the proper steps, which don't include a lawsuit.
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Old Today, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Great Lakes Region
97 posts, read 42,080 times
Reputation: 98
It was a rocky start, but communication is improving. We are focusing on moving forward with a new pediatrician who respects and actually addresses my concerns. Proper care from the beginning would have helped the transition and my worries. I appreciate all the responses.
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Old Today, 06:09 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
27,880 posts, read 33,500,630 times
Reputation: 33693
Quote:
Originally Posted by fadeddaisy26 View Post
It was a rocky start, but communication is improving. We are focusing on moving forward with a new pediatrician who respects and actually addresses my concerns. Proper care from the beginning would have helped the transition and my worries. I appreciate all the responses.
Good. I think a major part of the problem wasn't the school, which does need medical documentation to effect accommodations, but the doctor.
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