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Old 08-24-2017, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,028 posts, read 90,133,641 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RosieSD View Post
Yes, I was working part-time during those years. Luckily, I had flexible hours and telecommuted. More than once, I telecommuted from my car.

Moving closer to the school wasn't really an option for us due to the prices of homes in that area (over $1 millon).

It was exhausting for me, but I don't have any regrets about the choice we made. My kids received a wonderful education, made lifetime friends, and participated in extracurriculars that weren't available at our local high school.

But, as I said, now that my kids are doing great as adults, I think it probably would have worked out just as well for them to attend a high school closer to home.

Our kids had two parents who really cared about education (obviously), they were smart kids, and they were also very self-motivated. They could have succeeded in any number of schools, including our local high school.

Of course, we'll never know that for sure.

We all do what we feel is best for our kids at the time.
And the bold is key. That's why I think Kent's kids will do fine in School A. And I really would forget this "best high school in the state". Unless he lives in a very small state, there are likely to be a lot of similar "best schools". As I said earlier in the thread (I think, I've said this many times), I wouldn't want my kids going to a HS with an abysmal graduation rate, or one that doesn't offer a lot of choices, but other than that, the bold is far more important.

Absolutely!

Last edited by Katarina Witt; 08-24-2017 at 10:53 AM..
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Old 08-24-2017, 11:25 AM
 
7,620 posts, read 4,208,971 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kent_moore View Post
Hi! The School B is the one is far, another 20 minutes drive and it is new too (being new doesn't really matter to me).

School A is near, about a mile from our house one of the state's best HS.

School B is far, additional 20 minute drive, but it is considered one of the nation's best HS, hence I consider this better and A is fine.

Thanks for the clarification.

When all things are considered, I would definitely choose the school closer to home. The one that you are considering that is further away sounds like a rigid pressure cooker environment that puts a lot of emphasis on preparing for tests. There is so much more to education then that and I'd be afraid that my kids would burn out. I much prefer a more well rounded approach. Only you and your family can decide what is the best fit for your kids. Let us know what you choose and good luck either way.
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Old 08-24-2017, 02:53 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
769 posts, read 630,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MissTerri View Post
Thanks for the clarification.

When all things are considered, I would definitely choose the school closer to home. The one that you are considering that is further away sounds like a rigid pressure cooker environment that puts a lot of emphasis on preparing for tests. There is so much more to education then that and I'd be afraid that my kids would burn out. I much prefer a more well rounded approach. Only you and your family can decide what is the best fit for your kids. Let us know what you choose and good luck either way.
Thanks MissTerri!

Actually, both schools are considered pressure cooker (the amount of extra work required from students is almost the same). It is just that the further one I can say is more effective, hence, the higher test scores. I never had a first hand experience of School A, I just based it from parents review from many different websites. My kids are now attending the feeder school to School B which is a 12-15 minute drive from where we live, but their high-school is another 20 minute drive. So pretty much, I have the idea of how much work is required for School B.

I also understand about the well rounded approach of school as one major factors to consider by parents. But how do we parents gauge that? My kids used to be from district public school and they have plenty of time to play in school. I wasn't comfortable that when they reach home, they just play for the rest of the day. There is homework once in a while but it can be finished in 10 minutes. In their new school, despite being academic-focused, they also have some non-academic subjects like theater, music, basketball and chess (not on a daily basis though).

As for the kids getting burn-out. Guess what, on the first weekend after the school starts, my older kid got frustrated and cried while we're doing a lesson (a catch up lessons). He was shocked by the amount of time needed to complete all his homework and catching up on his lessons (this school has advanced curriculum). But one month passed, he's now doing pretty good. He would just frown at me first when hand him over his homework sheet but I can tell that he is now enjoying working on it. But yeah you're right, as a parent, I'm also afraid that one day my kid would just break down and get burned out. That's why I often I ask him if he likes his new school and always tell him that if he don't, I can always transfer him to another school but he keep responding the same thing over and over again, that he likes his new school. So I guess we're ok for now
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Old 08-24-2017, 03:14 PM
 
Location: Phoenix
769 posts, read 630,069 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
And the bold is key. That's why I think Kent's kids will do fine in School A. And I really would forget this "best high school in the state". Unless he lives in a very small state, there are likely to be a lot of similar "best schools". As I said earlier in the thread (I think, I've said this many times), I wouldn't want my kids going to a HS with an abysmal graduation rate, or one that doesn't offer a lot of choices, but other than that, the bold is far more important.

Absolutely!
You're right, but let me comment on this:

Quote:
Our kids had two parents who really cared about education (obviously), they were smart kids, and they were also very self-motivated. They could have succeeded in any number of schools, including our local high school.
I mentioned in another post that my kids have been to a local school. Once in a week homework and play all day long. They were happy. We communicate with the teachers and they are all saying good things about my kids in school. But come grading time, it was disappointing

It's like a carrot and stick where the later applies more appropriate for both me and my kids. The higher standards imposed by the school results to more motivation for the group. When the standard is low, sometimes results to less motivation from the group.

RosieSD mentioned that she's not sure about it and only her kids can answer a hypothetical question: If you graduated from the local public school, will you be as successful as you are right now?

Quote:
Of course, we'll never know that for sure.
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Old 08-24-2017, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,028 posts, read 90,133,641 times
Reputation: 27645
Quote:
Originally Posted by kent_moore View Post
You're right, but let me comment on this:



I mentioned in another post that my kids have been to a local school. Once in a week homework and play all day long. They were happy. We communicate with the teachers and they are all saying good things about my kids in school. But come grading time, it was disappointing

It's like a carrot and stick where the later applies more appropriate for both me and my kids. The higher standards imposed by the school results to more motivation for the group. When the standard is low, sometimes results to less motivation from the group.

RosieSD mentioned that she's not sure about it and only her kids can answer a hypothetical question: If you graduated from the local public school, will you be as successful as you are right now?
Your kids are currently in 1st and 4th grade, so if this happened in the past they were very young. I think you have unrealistic expectations of the power of homework in particular.

My kids went to a public, neighborhood middle school that was very homework oriented, and some teachers there were completely over the top. An example - a big, group project was assigned in social studies right before Memorial Day weekend due the following Monday. If one of the families had plans for the holiday, well, sucks to be you! It was nuts! (I refused to let my second child take their course.) Their 6th grade math teacher, OTOH, said that proficiency in math requires practice so she assigned twenty minutes a night of HW, M-Thursday. That's reasonable. In fact, the entire math dept. there was pretty reasonable. These SS teachers (one of whom is now a counselor there, God help those kids) kept saying "we have to get you ready for high school".

Interestingly, high school was less HW oriented and way more flexible. They were willing to give kids an extension on a paper if there was a good reason, which included conflicts with sports competitions. A friend said a high school teacher told her that our MS was into "quantity vs quality" re: homework, and I would agree. Please note that's not to say that they had no homework, or were not challenged in HS.

BTW, my older one has a doctorate and the younger a master's, both from the University of Colorado Health Science Center, and both went to highly ranked colleges.

No one can answer RosieSD's question. We simply don't know.
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Old 08-24-2017, 05:38 PM
 
7,620 posts, read 4,208,971 times
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I think that your kids are going to do well no matter what you choose to do because you are a parent that cares about their education and wants them to be successful and is more then willing to support them all along the way.

It sounds like you prefer the far away school and if that is the case then go for it. The commute will be something that you can figure out as you go. If things aren't working out wiht the school and it's not what you had hoped it would be then you can always come back to the neighborhood school. If things do work out, maybe you can moves closer to the school.
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Old 08-24-2017, 10:06 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, Nor Cal
5,817 posts, read 3,207,311 times
Reputation: 7339
Some of the better schools in our city are within a 30 minute drive. The IB middle school my dd1 attends is a 2.5 mile drive, and the high school a 4 mile drive. Both are known for their academics and arts programs. The high school is considered the "Harvard" of schools in our metro city.

I went to a top performing arts magnet school for 7-11th grade. Before we moved the middle and high school were really close, around 1-5 miles, and after we moved my mother commuted 20 or so minutes to the school.
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Old 08-25-2017, 01:56 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
2,836 posts, read 2,239,189 times
Reputation: 7229
There are a number of studies pointing toward the idea that substantial formal homework is basically without benefit at the elementary school level. There may be some use for brief daily tasks to get kids into the habit of studying at home (e.g. a ten minute arithmetic assignment per night).

Recreational reading (and being read to) outside the school day produce a more significant ROI.
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Old 08-25-2017, 01:22 PM
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,028 posts, read 90,133,641 times
Reputation: 27645
I have a question for you, OP. When you say a "30 minute drive" how many miles are you talking about, 12-15 (which can take 30 min sometimes in a city/suburb) or 25-30? It would make a big difference to me. The latter seems awfully far, and will to you sometimes, too. The former wouldn't be *too* bad.
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Old 08-25-2017, 01:25 PM
 
205 posts, read 57,520 times
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Technically nowhere, since I home educate

But if one of my kids was enrolled and needed a good program I'd be willing to drive 10-15 miles, max.
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