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Old Yesterday, 09:37 PM
 
Location: Beehive State
4,224 posts, read 4,495,960 times
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I don't like communal supplies in any grade from K-12.
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Old Yesterday, 09:50 PM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
18,665 posts, read 7,286,332 times
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My grandson started kindergarten this year and his dad got a list of supplies he needed; markers, blunt scissors, glue sticks, ziplock baggies, tissues and hand sanitizer. All the stuff is used communally, it doesn't matter it to him, he was just surprised by it.

Slightly off topic, but when I went to school back in the dark ages (the 1950's) I used to spend more time smelling the mimeographed papers than I did doing any school work, I sometimes wonder if it made me high or something? It was the most awesome smell
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Old Yesterday, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
1,786 posts, read 580,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
Slightly off topic, but when I went to school back in the dark ages (the 1950's) I used to spend more time smelling the mimeographed papers than I did doing any school work, I sometimes wonder if it made me high or something? It was the most awesome smell
Interesting...

My high school (mainly late 90's) used carbonless carbon paper for its detention slips. There were 3 or 4 slips of different colors, lightly bound together; the teacher wrote on the topmost slip, and ink carried over to all of them. I got the white slip; I don't know where other slips went. The paper had a starchy sweet smell, almost like jello. It made getting detentions slightly less unpleasant.
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Old Yesterday, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Texas
40,034 posts, read 43,957,166 times
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I don't like or believe in them (we never had them growing up).
I think making sure you have your pencils/pens/supplies is part of teaching responsibility.
I remember the cute case I'd keep everything in.
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Old Yesterday, 10:26 PM
 
Location: Tennessee at last!
1,459 posts, read 1,209,215 times
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I prefer no communal supplies at any grade!

As a parent I hate providing communal supplies especially WITHOUT FIRST BEING TOLD THE SUPPLIES ARE NOT FOR MY KID. I much prefer that the teacher gives a list of what my kid needs and then says something like, 'if you can provide extra supplies for those students that may not be able to afford them, it would be appreciated.' I really do not like to buy 3 special notebooks and then see my kid's name colored off two of them and another kid's name put on them at Back to School night. Especially when they were very specific in what was requested and the items were expensive.

I would prefer to not have any communal supplies, except for tissues and cleaners.

I also especially disliked the communal snacks where I was told that it was my kids turn to bring 32 servings of fruit OR 32 fruit juice containers (or $16 to buy from the cafeteria) OR 32 individual bags of pop corn OR 32 granola bars ---with a 3 day notice. It would mean a special trip to a far away store from the rural area I lived in as one never knew what they would be assigned or in advance. In our school, by first grade enough parents got upset with the communal snacks that we could sign a paper to opt out, and our kid could bring their own snack. That was great!

By second grade though the teachers were asking the 'opt out' kids to bring snacks for those still in the snack pool as too many kids in the snack pool did not bring their assigned snacks. Seems that most of the parents that opted out were also the parents that actually sent in the snacks!
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Old Yesterday, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
1,786 posts, read 580,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lae60 View Post
I also especially disliked the communal snacks where I was told that it was my kids turn to bring 32 servings of fruit OR 32 fruit juice containers (or $16 to buy from the cafeteria) OR 32 individual bags of pop corn OR 32 granola bars ---with a 3 day notice. It would mean a special trip to a far away store from the rural area I lived in as one never knew what they would be assigned or in advance. In our school, by first grade enough parents got upset with the communal snacks that we could sign a paper to opt out, and our kid could bring their own snack. That was great!
I can kind of, sort of, partially, maybe, wrap my mind around communal supplies. But communal snacks? Are you kidding me? At this rate, we might as well hang a hammer-and-sickle flag from the ceiling, and make kids goose-step around the classroom for their stretch break.

I realize communal snacks are a classroom equivalent of the office snack pool, in a way. But kids are too young to understand the unwritten rule of "if you don't bring anything, you don't eat". Which makes them quasi-mandatory, unless the teacher has the decency to let kids opt out. Besides, snacks have no part in a classroom, except as a special occasion thing. Even first-graders can wait an hour until lunch; my generation managed (yes, the Millennials ), and so can today's snowflakes. (I can understand the need for snacks in kindergarten, since it's a transitional grade of sorts; but that's it.)

I weep for our country!
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Old Today, 08:06 AM
 
12,027 posts, read 6,575,381 times
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I honestly don't remember any of this being an issue when my kids were in elementary school. I guess I'm getting old.
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Old Today, 08:16 AM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
6,219 posts, read 1,445,523 times
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In our school district it starts in Middle school which is 5th grade here. I had to buy 60 pencils for my 4th grader this year. YES, I said SIXTY!!! Obviously my daughter is not using all 60 pencils herself! My other daughter is in 6th grade and she had to bring Kleenex and Clorox wipes, but besides that all her supplies are for her.
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Old Today, 08:42 AM
 
Location: East Coast
1,943 posts, read 955,794 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by saibot View Post
Back in the 1970s, I recall having paper and pencils supplied in the early elementary grades. K and 1 had horrible rough "recycled" paper and fat pencils with no erasers. It was really nice to switch to regular yellow #2 pencils and better-quality white lined paper in grade 2. But if I recall correctly, by the time we were in 4th grade or so, we were expected to bring our own pencils and paper in a binder.

I would think by grade 4 or at the latest 5, students could be responsible for bringing their own basic supplies. Of course the teacher can have some extras on hand, but not be expected to supply everything for the whole class.
OMG --- I had totally forgotten about that paper until I read your post! Yes - I hated that paper, too! I was in school in the 70s, and I remember we had this rectangular lined paper that they supplied in the lower grades. And in the earliest grades it was that brownish-recycled paper that I hated. I remember being happy when at some point, we got to switch to the crisp, white paper. I think we still brought our own pencils, but I don't remember for sure.

I think we used that paper until about 3rd grade, when you had to switch to the 3 ring binder paper. And we definitely had to supply our own then. I think I'd run out around January, and I do recall sometimes running out mid-day, and we'd have to go buy another pack.
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Old Today, 09:40 AM
 
Location: Crook County, Illinois
1,786 posts, read 580,778 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CGab View Post
In our school district it starts in Middle school which is 5th grade here. I had to buy 60 pencils for my 4th grader this year. YES, I said SIXTY!!! Obviously my daughter is not using all 60 pencils herself! My other daughter is in 6th grade and she had to bring Kleenex and Clorox wipes, but besides that all her supplies are for her.
60 pencils per kid? Whoa!!!

With 20 kids in class, 60 * 20 = 1200. Why in the world would a teacher want 1200 pencils in communal stock? Do these requirements lists (oops, I mean "wish lists" ) come out every year?

Now, let's say the school year is 180 days long. So, 1200 / 180 = 6.66. That's over 6 pencils per day per classroom. How is it possible to use that many, without being obnoxiously wasteful? Back when I had to walk 5 miles to school, in the snow, uphill both ways , a single pencil lasted me about 2 weeks.

I'm sure this helps Ticonderoga CEO's; I just can't say the same for the families who buy those pencils, and the old-growth trees that get cut down to make them. Or maybe Ticonderoga lobbied that school, to make them implement such ridiculous supply requirements. Makes you wonder what schools do with all the leftover supplies.

Something fishy is going on.

Last edited by MillennialUrbanist; Today at 09:54 AM..
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