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Old 09-12-2017, 08:06 PM
 
1,098 posts, read 395,586 times
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The school district is responsible for seeing that student attire does not interfere with the health or safety of any student, that student attire does not contribute to a hostile or intimidating atmosphere for any student, and that dress code enforcement does not reinforce or increase marginalization or oppression of any group based on race, sex, gender identity, gender expression, sexual orientation, ethnicity, religion, cultural observance, household income, or body type/size. Any restrictions to the way a student dresses must be necessary to support the overall educational goals of the school and must be explained within this dress code.


What a pile of PC gobbledygook. Who gets to decide what's "hostile or intimidating"?
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Old 09-12-2017, 08:08 PM
 
392 posts, read 103,091 times
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I live in Illinois and while I can see there may be some issues with the policy, I think it's a positive step forward. It is degrading to measure students clothes, and rigid guidelines like inches diminish the value and importance of students developing good judgement.

My local school has pretty simple dress code, but it is still very sexist. Girls are required to dress 'age appropriate' and not wear 'revealing, excessively baggy, or attention-seeking' attire.

But boys are pretty much allowed to wear whatever they want--baggy pants hanging down below their butts, or skinny jeans that reveal their genitalia. There is no part of a boy's body that is labelled 'suggestive' or 'indecent' while girls are told that their upper arms, shoulders, collarbones, and knees are sexual objects that render men incapable of self-control.

Not only does the policy shame girls, but it assumes that only girls are sexual objects and subject to sexual harassment.

The whole policy is archaic. I find it particularly insidious because this is an elementary school--this is where we should be teaching kids about equality and fair treatment and instead we are doing the opposite. They will carry these lessons throughout their life.
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Old 09-12-2017, 08:13 PM
 
392 posts, read 103,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jamary1 View Post
Who gets to decide what's "hostile or intimidating"?
The US Supreme Court has already done that, fortunately.....
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Old 09-12-2017, 08:16 PM
 
392 posts, read 103,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psr13 View Post
It says that breasts must be fully covered but then says that there isn't a cleavage coverage requirement. Who in the heck is going to decide what fully covered means, then? This could get messy very quickly.
I think this clause is in specific reaction to some districts that require girls to wear necklines no lower than their collarbone....which is extremely limiting when it comes to shopping for kids' clothes. I mean requiring that girls remain covered up to their necks is really only a step short of requiring they wear a burqa.
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Old 09-12-2017, 09:12 PM
 
Location: Beehive State
4,232 posts, read 4,519,173 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MarianRavenwood View Post
I think this clause is in specific reaction to some districts that require girls to wear necklines no lower than their collarbone....which is extremely limiting when it comes to shopping for kids' clothes. I mean requiring that girls remain covered up to their necks is really only a step short of requiring they wear a burqa.
That doesn't change the doublespeak of requiring breasts to be covered but to say there is no cleavage coverage requirement. Someone's going to have to figure out what that actually means. (I've never seen a school dress code, outside of say Orthodox Jewish schools, that specifies no necklines below the collarbone.)
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Old 09-12-2017, 09:30 PM
 
392 posts, read 103,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by psr13 View Post
That doesn't change the doublespeak of requiring breasts to be covered but to say there is no cleavage coverage requirement. Someone's going to have to figure out what that actually means.
It's not really that complicated. Cleavage is between the breasts. So the rule means you can show skin between the breasts but breasts themselves must be covered.

Keep in mind, these girls aren't old enough to have saggy **** like the rest of us. So cleavage is between not above.....
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:27 PM
 
Location: Middle America
32,637 posts, read 33,896,068 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
Interestingly, that is my kids old high school.

Here is the dress code itself rather than an article from the daily mall. I will be interested to see how this plays out.

https://www.eths.k12.il.us/site/Defa...px?PageID=1381
I'm very familiar with this high school and community, and this seems like a reasonable dress code.
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Old 09-13-2017, 08:50 PM
 
14,722 posts, read 14,953,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TabulaRasa View Post
I'm very familiar with this high school and community, and this seems like a reasonable dress code.
I agree, but I still am unsure of how this will play itself out. Both my kids went to ETHS quite a while ago and they think this is a good idea.
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Old Yesterday, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,227 posts, read 2,648,135 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
I agree, but I still am unsure of how this will play itself out. Both my kids went to ETHS quite a while ago and they think this is a good idea.
There probably won't be many problems, if any, in Evanston, Illinois and I doubt there were many problems before the policy was adopted. I'm not familiar with the town, but I've read about it and I daresay I think I'm from a similar town in New Jersey (wealthy, two-parent households, progressive).


The problems will only begin when towns and cities that don't have Evanston's demographics try and emulate the new policy.
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Old Yesterday, 07:13 PM
 
14,722 posts, read 14,953,472 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
There probably won't be many problems, if any, in Evanston, Illinois and I doubt there were many problems before the policy was adopted. I'm not familiar with the town, but I've read about it and I daresay I think I'm from a similar town in New Jersey (wealthy, two-parent households, progressive).


The problems will only begin when towns and cities that don't have Evanston's demographics try and emulate the new policy.
Evanston is not wealthy. It has some wealthy families, but also has its share of poor families. It has a 13.4% poverty rate. It's population is about 75,000 and it's median property value is around $350,000. ETHS has almost 3000 students. The students are about 45% white, 29% black, 18% hispanic and 4% asian. 40% of the students are eligible for free lunch. South Evanston tends to be higher in crime than North Evanston, especially near the Chicago border. There are gangs at the high school, though. It is also home to Northwestern University which contributes to its culture, but which does not give the city much money.

I lived in Evanston for over 35 years and love it, but you have no clue about the city if you think that there were not problems at the high school.
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