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Old 09-09-2017, 10:58 PM
 
Location: Texas
41,014 posts, read 45,270,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Perhaps you could provide some documentation for this rather outrageous statement?
Why don't you Google the meta-analysis done by the Duke professor re: the studies done about homework.

Taken as a whole, it points to the appropriate amount of homework actually being advantageous. The articles that discuss this also point out that too much homework can be detrimental.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:22 PM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
20,134 posts, read 7,998,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
Perhaps you could provide some documentation for this rather outrageous statement?
I'd like to see it too since before I even started this thread I did some research about the value of homework for young kids and there doesn't seem much if any benefit to it.

Kids have three times too much homework, study finds - CNN

Homework: Is It Good for Kids? Here's What the Research Says | Time.com

Yes, there is a limit to how much homework your child should do - LA Times

My son has read to his child every night since he got sole custody over a year and a half ago and he is very good at reading to him, he has his son read along with him and I would guess that he can sight read at least 100 words now, so it's not like this kid comes home and plays video games all day. He has gymnastics classes, engages in all the seasonal sports, i.e. t-ball, soccer, swims almost every day and plays outside with neighborhood kids.

I just don't like to see him look so miserable when it's 'homework time'. My son put him in this school because it has an excellent reputation, not just among parents but with teachers in other district, when they talk about "good schools" this is the one they mention.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:24 PM
 
6,557 posts, read 6,958,575 times
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When I went to kindergarten, back in the stone age, it was a half day and I did get daily homework, but not nearly the amount this child is being assigned. Education swings like a pendulum. When my kids were in grade school, the trend was to have a lot of homework. Now, there are schools that are not assigning any homework.

I just wish to mention to anyone who has not set foot in a kindergarten class in over 5 years, it has changed a great deal. Most are now full day kindergartens and they have to fill up that time somehow. Kindergarten is now what first grade was 5 years ago. They are expected to be fully independent fluent readers and writers by the end of year.

Identification of shapes such as hexagon, pentagon, octagon, equilateral triangle, isosceles triangle,parallelogram, rhombus, are part of the New York State Common Core standards for pre-kindergarten. Drawing these figures are part of the New York State Common Core standards for kindergarten.
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:30 PM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
20,134 posts, read 7,998,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Why don't you Google the meta-analysis done by the Duke professor re: the studies done about homework.

Taken as a whole, it points to the appropriate amount of homework actually being advantageous. The articles that discuss this also point out that too much homework can be detrimental.
Ok, I read it, and here's what it says:

"Cooper said the research is consistent with the "10-minute rule" suggesting the optimum amount of homework that teachers ought to assign. The "10-minute rule," Cooper said, is a commonly accepted practice in which teachers add 10 minutes of homework as students progress one grade. In other words, a fourth-grader would be assigned 40 minutes of homework a night"
https://today.duke.edu/2006/03/homework.html

If he had 10 minutes of homework a night I wouldn't have started this thread, that's for sure
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:45 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
64,683 posts, read 54,297,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
My grandson started K in August in a highly rated public fundamental elementary school. He is assigned a minimum of 30 minutes of homework a night but if you make him do everything that the teacher sends home it's more like an hour to 90 minutes a night. On top of the homework he has to log into lexiacore5 every night.

Here's a sample list of the homework for a week:

  • Read a book with the child each night and then have the child answer questions about the book.
  • 3-6 pages of math or identifying or drawing shapes (who knew a K kid needed to know hexagons, trapezoids and pentagons!)
  • 4 other tasks, such as i.e rhyming, identifying similar starting sounds in words. Identify a sentence in a book count the words in a sentence & identify a paragraph & count the sentences. Practice working with the calendar and with telling time. Cut shapes out paste them on paper so they tell a story.
  • Practice in Lexia

Is that normal? I sort of remember taking naps in K and learning how not to cry when I was away from my mom but I sure don't remember homework
OP, you said this is a week's worth of homework, not one night's worth. For a week, this is perfectly fine. Practice working with the calendar, over a week's time. Sounds good, very practical. Practice telling time. (Interesting assignment; what type of clock does the teacher want the kids to use? Digital? Analog? She should be specific.)3-6 pages of math in 5 days? A page a day, or less. How dense are these pages?

You didn't have homework in K, OP, because K was much less rigorous then. Your K work is now pre-K. But I'm curious to know, now, what the remaining 20+ weeks in the K class are going to cover.

Cut shapes out & paste them on paper so they tell a story? Boy, I'd flunk that!
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Old 09-09-2017, 11:57 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
64,683 posts, read 54,297,103 times
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If it's true that your list is a week's worth of homework, this sounds like a really good school! The reading, from what you say, sounds like a pleasant experience for the child, and he even reads along, so that part of the homework doesn't seem to be perceived as "work". It's fun.

Practicing telling time, and learning how a calendar works can also be fun. Counting the words in a sentence can be done at the end of the reading activity. Same with identifying a paragraph. Rhyming can also be a fun game that could be done any time, even in the car. Some of this can be presented as play. That would leave the math pages (which are spread out over a week's time) and the shapes learning. If that's the only actual "work", vs. play, it's not much at all. 10-15 minutes, probably.

Also, I'd like to point out that the rhyming exercises, and the identifying similar starting words sounds to me like preparation for phonics. My god, if this school is going to teach phonics, you should thank your lucky stars! That's rare, in some states. I wonder what the 1st grade curriculum is.

Why are his eyes glazing over after 45 minutes? 45 minutes of what--reading? What kind of books are being assigned--War And Peace?! Whatever happened to fairy tales, and Dick and Jane? Could you be more specific, OP? Some of this isn't making sense.
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Old 09-10-2017, 12:05 AM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
20,134 posts, read 7,998,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP, you said this is a week's worth of homework, not one night's worth. For a week, this is perfectly fine. Practice working with the calendar, over a week's time. Sounds good, very practical. Practice telling time. (Interesting assignment; what type of clock does the teacher want the kids to use? Digital? Analog? She should be specific.)3-6 pages of math in 5 days? A page a day, or less. How dense are these pages?

You didn't have homework in K, OP, because K was much less rigorous then. Your K work is now pre-K. But I'm curious to know, now, what the remaining 20+ weeks in the K class are going to cover.

Cut shapes out & paste them on paper so they tell a story? Boy, I'd flunk that!
He has 4 days to do the work, he brings the homework home on Monday and returns it on Friday. Last week the teacher forgot to send the work home until Wednesday so he had to do it in two days. He also has to use Lexiacore5 nightly which is a computerized reading study program. And I don't know what they will do for the rest of the school year, what he's doing now pretty much satisfies common core standards for K.

One of his assignments was to identify emotion words in the book he read with his dad. Oh that was a real joy...there were none so they had to read a second book with 'emotion words'. Another project was to identify pictures on a page which shared two similar attributes, he was totally lost with that one because he was convinced he had to find two 'identical things' in the pictures, not merely similar.
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Old 09-10-2017, 12:14 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
64,683 posts, read 54,297,103 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
He has 4 days to do the work, he brings the homework home on Monday and returns it on Friday. Last week the teacher forgot to send the work home until Wednesday so he had to do it in two days. He also has to use Lexiacore5 nightly which is a computerized reading study program. And I don't know what they will do for the rest of the school year, what he's doing now pretty much satisfies common core standards for K.

One of his assignments was to identify emotion words in the book he read with his dad. Oh that was a real joy...there were none so they had to read a second book with 'emotion words'. Another project was to identify pictures on a page which shared two similar attributes, he was totally lost with that one because he was convinced he had to find two 'identical things' in the pictures, not merely similar.
This sounds like Dad isn't quite clued into the program, yet. Before they choose a book to read (you said they go to the library. I assume that's not daily, but maybe once/week to pick a batch of books?), they should look at the day's assignment. If it's to identify emotion words, they can choose the book accordingly.

The parent's failure to key book choices to the day's reading questions is not the school's fault. It sounds like this program is a learning curve for both student and parent. It also sounds like perhaps some of dad's frustrations are rubbing off on his son. Making a kid do a reading assignment twice seems harsh.

RE: the underlined--I bet he wasn't the only child to see the exercise that way. That sounds typical for 5-year-olds. So the assignment, it seems, was about teaching what "similar" means, vs. "the same" or "alike". I could see Sesame Street doing a unit on that, and also having a rhyming game that turns into a K-level rap composition.

Last edited by Ruth4Truth; 09-10-2017 at 12:23 AM..
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Old 09-10-2017, 12:23 AM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
20,134 posts, read 7,998,860 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
This sounds like Dad isn't quite clued into the program, yet. Before they choose a book to read (you said they go to the library. I assume that's not daily, but maybe once/week to pick a batch of books?), they should look at the day's assignment. If it's to identify emotion words, they can choose the book accordingly.

The parent's failure to key book choices to the day's reading questions is not the school's fault. It sounds like this program is a learning curve for both student and parent.

RE: the underlined--I bet he wasn't the only child to see the exercise that way. That sounds typical for 5-year-olds. So the assignment, it seems, was about teaching what "similar" means, vs. "the same" or "alike". I could see Sesame Street doing a unit on that, and also having a rhyming game that turns into a K-level rap composition.
Dad works all week and takes him to the library Saturday morning, so no, he has no idea what kind of books he needs for assignments but he has 30 or 40 books that he can fall back on if the ones they get at the library don't work out.
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Old 09-10-2017, 12:29 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
64,683 posts, read 54,297,103 times
Reputation: 56359
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
Dad works all week and takes him to the library Saturday morning, so no, he has no idea what kind of books he needs for assignments but he has 30 or 40 books that he can fall back on if the ones they get at the library don't work out.
I think the real question in all this is whether homework in K should be so demanding that the parent needs to be involved for an hour or more every evening. Is that reasonable to require of parents? I can see dad getting sick of this after a month or two, lol. Maybe by then he'll get the hang of it. Someone else posted that they read to their child daily, anyway. But then, aside from reading, there are other tasks to keep track of, and check off the list. Seems like a lot for a single parent.

It does seem that they're covering enough material in the first few weeks that they might run out of K-level things to work on in a while.
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