U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 09-09-2017, 11:38 PM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
19,177 posts, read 7,538,323 times
Reputation: 14349

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I think the real question in all this is whether homework in K should be so demanding that the parent needs to be involved for an hour or more every evening. Is that reasonable to require of parents? I can see dad getting sick of this after a month or two, lol. Maybe by then he'll get the hang of it.

It does seem that they're covering enough material in the first few weeks that they might run out of K-level things to work on in a while.
I guess we will have to wait and see how it goes. Some of the parents I've talked to said they are refusing to have their child do more than 30 minutes of homework a night and that the teacher is aware of it and has not said anything to them about it. I haven't talked to any parent who said that their kid does the work in less than 30 minutes so maybe all the kids are dummies or the parent's are lousy tutors I don't really know.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 09-10-2017, 12:07 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
63,450 posts, read 52,743,442 times
Reputation: 54599
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I guess we will have to wait and see how it goes. Some of the parents I've talked to said they are refusing to have their child do more than 30 minutes of homework a night and that the teacher is aware of it and has not said anything to them about it. I haven't talked to any parent who said that their kid does the work in less than 30 minutes so maybe all the kids are dummies or the parent's are lousy tutors I don't really know.
Well, again, how are the parents defining "homework"? If some parents say they read to their child daily anyway, how is incorporating that into the curriculum creating an unfair burden? The only difference is that there's a study question or two afterwards. Though again, for single working parents, the reading + keeping track of the rest seems like a lot.

If we don't count the reading, on the theory that it's something parents do with their child anyway, that leaves 1/2 page to a full page of math daily (we don't know how many problems there are per page), learning a shape or two daily, playing a rhyming game for a couple of minutes, and counting the sentences in a paragraph from the reading, or identifying a paragraph, and understanding what that is.

Oh, then there's the online work. OK, when you add that in, it's a lot. Kindergarten seems like too young to be on the computer doing homework, but what do I know? I didn't grow up in the computer age. Still, it seems like this could turn kids off from school and computers. The online work does make it seem like the homework is never-ending. They do the math/geometry, the rhyming (etc.), clock/calendar work (or play), a story, only to realize they're not done with homework. There's more! I see what you mean, now.

Another point is that if reading to the child daily is something that parents do anyway, whether the child is in school or not (I'm just taking another poster's comment and running with it), then parents shouldn't make it seem like homework. Why take a pleasurable ritual between parent and child, and turn it into work? The reading could be set aside for closer to bedtime, and done as a bedtime story, but not so close to bedtime that the child will start falling asleep. He would still have to answer a study question, and count sentences (or whatever). But the reading could be part of normal parent-child bonding, as "story time", while the rest of it could take place at a separate time, which would be the "homework time".

I'm just thinking out loud, here. How much time does the online work take, usually? And I'm still curious as to what these books are, that are so time-consuming to read.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 01:19 AM
 
Location: Ohio
5,577 posts, read 3,815,065 times
Reputation: 6551
In homeschooling we have NO homework....
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 02:19 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
2,935 posts, read 2,291,276 times
Reputation: 7524
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2sleepy View Post
I just don't like to see him look so miserable when it's 'homework time'.
So make homework time fun. Turn it into a game rather than treating it like a chore.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 06:16 AM
Status: "Fall is here!" (set 12 hours ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
81,324 posts, read 90,834,944 times
Reputation: 27910
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
Why don't you Google the meta-analysis done by the Duke professor re: the studies done about homework.

Taken as a whole, it points to the appropriate amount of homework actually being advantageous. The articles that discuss this also point out that too much homework can be detrimental.
Generally when one makes a claim it is their responsibility to support it, not the other way around.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 06:41 AM
 
Location: So Ca
11,117 posts, read 11,158,576 times
Reputation: 8773
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Another point is that if reading to the child daily is something that parents do anyway, whether the child is in school or not (I'm just taking another poster's comment and running with it), then parents shouldn't make it seem like homework. Why take a pleasurable ritual between parent and child, and turn it into work?
Any parent of a young child knows that reading daily is not always going to happen, and that this pleasurable activity is not always so pleasurable, especially for many 5 year olds who would probably rather be out playing. So I can see how this could be viewed as work by both the kid AND the parent.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 07:45 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
30,058 posts, read 37,464,016 times
Reputation: 47911
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
Any parent of a young child knows that reading daily is not always going to happen, and that this pleasurable activity is not always so pleasurable, especially for many 5 year olds who would probably rather be out playing. So I can see how this could be viewed as work by both the kid AND the parent.
One little ploy that worked for me is reading before going to sleep. My kids had to be in bed by 8:00, but they could read as long as they wanted, and they did, because it made them feel like they were getting away with something.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 08:40 AM
 
Location: Saint John, IN
6,596 posts, read 1,565,988 times
Reputation: 6469
If this is the amount of WEEKLY work and not NIGHTLY, then this is normal. I must have not seen where it said weekly.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
19,177 posts, read 7,538,323 times
Reputation: 14349
Quote:
Originally Posted by CA4Now View Post
Any parent of a young child knows that reading daily is not always going to happen, and that this pleasurable activity is not always so pleasurable, especially for many 5 year olds who would probably rather be out playing. So I can see how this could be viewed as work by both the kid AND the parent.
You're right, it has become work to him because now when he reads with his dad he is focusing on the questions that need to be answered more than the content of the book such as "list the rhyming words in the book" If he doesn't know the activity before he reads the book then he has to read it with dad a second time in order to respond to the question posed by the teacher.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 09-10-2017, 09:03 AM
 
Location: Somewhere Over the Rainbow
19,177 posts, read 7,538,323 times
Reputation: 14349
Quote:
Originally Posted by CGab View Post
If this is the amount of WEEKLY work and not NIGHTLY, then this is normal. I must have not seen where it said weekly.
homework is sent home on Monday and has to be returned on Friday, so he has 4 nights to complete the work
Nightly:
study online with Lexiacore5 literacy program
read a book and answer various questions about it
do one or two pages of math (that's pretty easy)
Choose one of the optional activities which vary from week to week, I listed some earlier

Lexia takes 30 minutes
Reading a book and answering the questions takes 15-20 minutes
math takes 10 minutes max
other activities vary in how long they take, the one that took the longest was when he had to cut out pictures and paste them on a paper so that they told a story.

Total per night: If everything goes well he can finish in 45 minutes, if he gets stuck on something or needs to be provided with extra help (explaining pentagrams was harder than we expected) then it will be 60-90 minutes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2017, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32 - Top