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Old 12-05-2018, 09:34 AM
 
15,970 posts, read 13,418,679 times
Reputation: 19909

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
I had plenty of classes (in regular classrooms, not science or computer labs with fixed capacity) with more than 24 students. I had a teacher who had 4 classes in a row (which was normally not allowed) and had 6 classes rather than the usual 5. Perhaps that was to compensate for the fact that I had him for a class with only 13 students, and that was there way to avoid hiring another teacher.
Read for content. I never said that was in your teacher contract, you did. Class size is almost never dictated by teacher contact. In fact lab size is a function of state regulation and NSTA guidelines not teacher contract. Which is a perfect example of how uninformed you are about how school's function and why you should not assume what is or is not a function of contract.



Quote:
And I already explained that they won't do that if it would require hiring another teacher.



How things are done depend on the school.



You think I'm impressed? I'm not.



Fair enough, since the internet is international.
Let me know when you get done whinging.



Quote:
Maybe if you weren't so rude to me, I wouldn't feel the need to be the "grammar police" with you.
Maybe if you had a even a slight acknowledgement that you don't know every single details of how schools function I wouldn't need to point out the flaws in your post.



Quote:
No, I base it on accepted spelling in the US, not based on what I and I alone think is right. I can't fault you for using UK spelling on an international message board, but you'd be wrong to use UK spelling in the American school that you claim to teach at.
LMAO! You think a favored spelling is inherently correct? Another perfect example of what is wrong with your posts and the "grammar police" tendencies.

Quote:
Are you aware that different states have different laws? Then again, you probably didn't learn that in your UK prep school.
You went to school in Long Island. I am familiar with their laws. Please cite which law you claim makes it legal for teachers to teach outside their certification, particularly in AP classes. Otherwise you are just making it up.

 
Old 12-05-2018, 12:22 PM
 
5,070 posts, read 4,648,876 times
Reputation: 3255
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Read for content. I never said that was in your teacher contract, you did. Class size is almost never dictated by teacher contact. In fact lab size is a function of state regulation and NSTA guidelines not teacher contract. Which is a perfect example of how uninformed you are about how school's function and why you should not assume what is or is not a function of contract.

I never said that lab size is based on a union contract. If anything, it is based on space availability.


One of my teachers said that his contract does not allow him to teach more than 5 classes, or more than 3 classes in a row. But that year, he had 6 classes and had 4 classes in a row, but he was not complaining.

Quote:
Let me know when you get done whinging.

You use that word whenever somebody doesn't agree with you. I'm not "whinging" about anything, just stating facts in a neutral way.

Quote:
Maybe if you had a even a slight acknowledgement that you don't know every single details of how schools function I wouldn't need to point out the flaws in your post.

I never said that I know about every single detail of how a school functions. Maybe you could realize that you don't know every single detail about the school district that I attended, since you never attended nor taught there.

Quote:
LMAO! You think a favored spelling is inherently correct? Another perfect example of what is wrong with your posts and the "grammar police" tendencies.

I never said that. If you don't agree with me, respond to the ideas, do not attack the person.


You seem to think that anything that you aren't interested or aren't good at is unimportant. And you seem to consider any of your beliefs to be irrefutable scientific fact.

Quote:
You went to school in Long Island. I am familiar with their laws. Please cite which law you claim makes it legal for teachers to teach outside their certification, particularly in AP classes. Otherwise you are just making it up.
I do not know the exact law. I'm just telling you what I was told by a teacher. He wasn't teaching AP classes.
 
Old 12-05-2018, 07:35 PM
 
15,459 posts, read 17,110,724 times
Reputation: 15160
Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
You went to school in Long Island. I am familiar with their laws. Please cite which law you claim makes it legal for teachers to teach outside their certification, particularly in AP classes. Otherwise you are just making it up.
Just an FYI

https://www.nysut.org/resources/spec...u-need-to-know

Quote:
Generally, a certified teacher cannot teach outside his or her certification area. However, the BOCES district superintendent may grant a school district permission to assign a teacher to teach a subject not covered by the teacher's certificate if no certified teacher is available, despite extensive recruitment efforts, and the teaching time does not exceed five classroom hours a week. This is known as "incidental teaching."
https://careertrend.com/the-requirem...-13653543.html

Quote:
The College Board recommends that AP teachers hold a bachelor's degree or higher in the area they teach or in a related field. For example, in addition to a teaching degree, an AP biology teacher would also hold a bachelor's degree in biology or another scientific field. Because AP classes should expose students to college-level curriculum and higher-level questions, the College Board also suggests that AP teachers hold an advanced degree, just as a college professor would.
Note the words recommends and suggests. While this is a good thing, it is NOT a requirement. Our AP Calculus teacher in the Chicago school I taught in had a Law degree, not a bachelors in mathematics. They also want teachers who are Nationally Board Certified, but again it is NOT are requirement.

Quote:
The College Board offers AP Summer Institutes, training courses and online forums to help teachers collaborate with other AP teachers and learn more about the program.
 
Old 12-06-2018, 12:55 AM
 
7,717 posts, read 8,153,401 times
Reputation: 8291
To be fair, when mitsguy was in high school, it was permitted for a certified teacher to teach a certain percent of the school day in an subject in which they did have the proper certifications. The percentage generally worked out to be one "period" per day. I can't remember the exact percentage, but it was some odd number. In 2004, NYS completely revised certification standards.
 
Old 12-06-2018, 01:49 AM
 
14 posts, read 1,586 times
Reputation: 15
Default equivalent of Gifted program in High School.

The only federal program for gifted children is the Jacob K. Javits Gifted and Talented Students Education Act, which focuses on identifying and serving students who are traditionally under-represented in gifted and talented programs (minority students, students from low-income backgrounds or who are English language
 
Old 12-06-2018, 11:17 AM
 
5,070 posts, read 4,648,876 times
Reputation: 3255
Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post

Sounds like I was right. Since it says up to 5 hours per week, that explains why it was limited to 1 period per day, since 2 periods would go over that limit.

Quote:
https://careertrend.com/the-requirem...-13653543.html

Note the words recommends and suggests. While this is a good thing, it is NOT a requirement. Our AP Calculus teacher in the Chicago school I taught in had a Law degree, not a bachelors in mathematics. They also want teachers who are Nationally Board Certified, but again it is NOT are requirement.
Thank you!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Coney View Post
To be fair, when mitsguy was in high school, it was permitted for a certified teacher to teach a certain percent of the school day in an subject in which they did have the proper certifications. The percentage generally worked out to be one "period" per day. I can't remember the exact percentage, but it was some odd number. In 2004, NYS completely revised certification standards.
Thank you! Another poster posted that it is / was 5 hours per week.
 
Old 12-12-2018, 03:49 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,052 posts, read 38,027,146 times
Reputation: 21227
What is the equivalent of Gifted program in High School?

no 'gifted' programs (or HS) needed... just pass a college entrance exam (very EZ) while in grade 9 or 10... then Consider using a state that offers FREE FT College INSTEAD of 'wasting away' in HS...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Running_Start

Full credits applied to your major while using a transfer contract to your chosen U.

Most RS participants I know finished HS and entered U as FULL Jr's at age 17. (many accepted to great schools of all types / majors)

12,000+ participants annually in WA (RS program has been available since 1990). Also in several other states under different names.

No AP / IB "busywork", no social challenges / bullying / "All_children_left_behind" ('dumbing down' Public Schools)
 
Old 12-12-2018, 10:10 PM
 
Location: midvalley Oregon and Eastside seattle area
3,248 posts, read 1,482,071 times
Reputation: 2578
We (I)had thought about it. But he was already a grade level ahead and a year younger than his classmates. We wanted to keep him in his peer group (he still sees his pubic school friends after 15 years). He likes socializing and keeping him in school was a good choice. On hs graduation, he could easily be classified as a junior at public university (OSU). He went private engineering school for college.
 
Old Today, 10:34 AM
 
12,485 posts, read 27,335,575 times
Reputation: 7001
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