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Old 11-23-2018, 04:59 PM
 
Location: The analog world
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Around here, it's generally Honors in 9/10 and AP in 11/12.

 
Old 11-24-2018, 09:22 AM
 
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Thanks to all. Really appreciate them.

Learned from you:

GMP - Gifted Math Program
STEM - Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics


My son is out-of-state and I am getting him to move with me for High School next school year. Where I live renting currently is extreme - the top Magnet High School is in a district surrounded by below average public High Schools.

But the Magnet High School is lottery as such I could not buy a property there yet, so I am renting.

However, I have found a nice area t(let's call it District B) that, even though has no Magnet HS, has a nice High School zoned to it and that is where I am currently building my house. Up to that point I know nothing other than Magnet.

Then as the First Quarter grading period is done, I asked my son to mail his grades. Then he mentioned he got Invited by his district High School to the IB Program. I only learned of IB that time.

So back to my State (remember he and me live in 2 different States), I inquired from that District B school department if they have an IB Program and was saddened there is no IB program in all their High School district. They did say they have an AP Program into the High School my house construction is zoned to.

So now I am questioning my decision of building the house in District B. They do not have a Magnet High School, which I knew beforehand, but then, they also do not have an IP Program, which I did not know beforehand. Double whammy!!


I wonder if I should keep on renting to the area where I am now (let's call it District A), which is zoned to the Magnet High School but also have IB Programs in the other below-average High Schools. Then just rent out or even sell the house in the District B before I could live there, simply because they have no IB Program.

Residency is a must for these schools that is why if my son wins the lottery to the Magnet High School, I shall keep on renting in District A. I wonder though if that does not happen, if it is worth to put my son in a below-average High School that has an IB Program or just go with District B that has the AP Program.

Also, are IB Program invite letters transferrable to any High School out of state?
 
Old 11-24-2018, 10:38 AM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
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No, an IB program invite does not necessarily transfer to another state or even another school district. Each district has limits on the number of available spaces.

My children's high school had five options for advanced work. One did not have to be part of a gifted program to participate. Option 1 was Honor's classes for some English, History, Math and Science courses. These were more rigorous. These started in the freshman (first) year. Option 2 was AP classes. A couple of these could be taken in grade 10. Most were reserved for grades 11 and 12. Option 3, the name is specific to my state, was Advanced College Project courses. These are often called dual credit courses. These were taught at the high school by approved instructors and gave students credits from a state university. Because we live in a town with a state university and a community college, students also had the option (4) to take courses at the university or community college for dual credits also. My son took a couple of these. The last option for advanced work was Foreign Language courses. Students that continued the study of a language started in Middle School were placed in the 3rd year of the language. They had the option for a fifth and sixth year of language which was the equivalent of the first and second year college courses. Most students that took the fifth and sixth year of the language tested out of the first year or two of that language in college (if the college did testing). Others elected to take the AP version and the AP test of the language.

It's not always about looking for a program called "gifted." It's about looking at the options in any particular high school for advanced study. Because of the courses they took in high school both of my kids had enough credits to graduate from college in 3 years and were able to focus their studies on their majors earlier. Son could have finished in 2.5, but we didn't see any reason to do so.
 
Old 11-24-2018, 01:16 PM
 
5,970 posts, read 3,196,383 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post

So back to my State (remember he and me live in 2 different States), I inquired from that District B school department if they have an IB Program and was saddened there is no IB program in all their High School district. They did say they have an AP Program into the High School my house construction is zoned to.

So now I am questioning my decision of building the house in District B. They do not have a Magnet High School, which I knew beforehand, but then, they also do not have an IP Program, which I did not know beforehand. Double whammy!!


I wonder if I should keep on renting to the area where I am now (let's call it District A), which is zoned to the Magnet High School but also have IB Programs in the other below-average High Schools. Then just rent out or even sell the house in the District B before I could live there, simply because they have no IB Program.
...
This is strictly my opinion, and I'm sure others will have a different one. The real question to ask is not whether AP or IB is better, but which district will he most thrive in and in which will you have the best overall quality of life. He may thrive the best in the schools with just AP or may thrive best in the other. Truth is, outside high school and the first semester of college, no one gives a rat's behind about whether someone went to a Magnet or IB program. It may help some kids get into some colleges, and a really bright advanced kid may thrive better in a Magnet or IB school than in another school. By January of freshman year, he will have put away his high school sweatshirts and awards and be in the college mindset.


There is more to the district than the school. There's the culture of the people in that district. How do the parents and other students view education? Will he spend the day in an environment that lifts him up or drags him down? Does he want college or to work with his hands? Different schools and different cultures. When he applies for a job in a few years, no one will ever ask if he went to a Magnet or IB school.
 
Old 11-24-2018, 01:31 PM
 
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It depends where you live. In larger cities there are usually a number of public high schools that are highly ranked academically outside of the normal district public high schools. For example in San Francisco there is Lowell High School (my alma mater). In NYC there is the Bronx High School of Science, Stuyvesant High School, Hunter College High School. These public high schools have competitive entrance requirements and are considered to be some of the best public high schools in the country. If you are in a suburb or small town where none of these high ranking academic schools are available, just getting very good marks in whatever high school they attend should suffice. It's also important to be engaged in extracurricular activities and have some friends as well. In high school I was on the debate team and the Jr. ROTC shooting team. At UCLA I was on the crew and also was a fencer. The most important thing I learned in school was that if I put my mind and effort into it I could do well. That was more important than any of the subjects I learned, most of which have been long forgotten.

Last edited by bobspez; 11-24-2018 at 01:39 PM..
 
Old 11-24-2018, 01:40 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
At first I thought it was Magnet Schools but apparently, those are lotteries instead of "Invites" based on academic grades.

Then there is the Advanced Placement (AP) Programs but not sure if they offer this for Freshmen or if it starts on Junior (Grade 11).

There is also an International Baccalaureate (IB) Program but reading through, it gave me an impression it is more of a cultural learning and appreciation program rather than academic.

I am looking for something straight Academic that invites qualified kids to the Program like the Gifted Programs in Elementary and Middle Schools.

My eldest is completing his Middle School this current school year and finding out High School is a different animal altogether. It didn't help I have no prior experience of HS in America.

TIA.
Freshmen can take AP classes. My son skipped both Algebra classes in middle school so he was able to take AP Calculus in high school (that is, 10th grade where he went to school, not 9th as in some districts; the middle school didn't offer AP classes yet).
 
Old 11-24-2018, 02:05 PM
Status: "Tinsel, not just for decoration" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,550 posts, read 39,948,785 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ukiyo-e View Post
Freshmen can take AP classes. My son skipped both Algebra classes in middle school so he was able to take AP Calculus in high school (that is, 10th grade where he went to school, not 9th as in some districts; the middle school didn't offer AP classes yet).
Yes, but he's an outlier. You might, in a non-Tech magnet high school, have one kid out of a thousand who's so advanced in Math that he can take AP Calc in 10th grade.

AP courses by definition are aimed at high school level simply because most kids aren't capable of that work until then. A middle school/junior high offering AP would be extraordinary.

The IB diploma program is aimed at 11th and 12th grade, some of the classes are two year courses as compared to one year for AP (an example would be IB Psychology being two years as compared to AP, which is one and actually covers more material although in less depth). Prior to 11th grade the program is called IB Middle Years where students are taught using IB endorsed methods.

I also have to contest an earlier statement about IB being more recognized than AP. That is incorrect. IB is less well known, is offered in orders of magnitude fewer schools and has many fewer students involved than AP ( 830 schools in the US for IB compared to 14000 for AP. The student numbers are 135000 v. 2000000).

https://www.usnews.com/education/blo...and-ib-classes
 
Old 11-24-2018, 02:32 PM
Status: "Epiphany Season" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
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OP, I would say to quit worrying about the "invitation". Although counseling in high schools could be better as many have stated here, if your son is bright, he will get steered towards the highest level classes he can handle.
 
Old 11-24-2018, 05:27 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
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In my kids' district, the high school equivalent is just honors or AP, and for the IB school, the MYP Diplomat program. My oldest was in the program before transferring out. The junior and senior year have Diploma Programme courses that are regarded as upper-level and extra rigorous. IBMYP and IBDP are considered college prep.

The IBMYP is by invitation based on grades and testing. Some students put together a portfolio of work to be submitted to a committee for review.
 
Old 11-25-2018, 07:55 AM
 
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Schools and School Districts really are different across the US. The HS in my School District has an enrichment class for gifted students, plus AP classes available with prerequisites for kids in grades 9- 12. You can usually find a website where you can compare school districts in the same state. The one that I like in Pennsylvania is done by the state and you can see how well kids do on standardized testing, demographics for an area, number of AP classes, etc. Welcome to PA School Performance Profile If you have a high performing student, he will do well wherever he goes to HS.
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