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Old 11-27-2018, 10:02 PM
Status: "Epiphany Season" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,535 posts, read 99,858,091 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralUSHomeowner View Post
What are they doing now....one is a medical doctor, one a medical researcher and the other in business. State schools that were "very selective" and I would never have encouraged my kids to go the "Ivy" or private/expensive route (unless the career could pay off the debt immediately). The state schools were nationally ranked.
They've done well!

 
Old 11-28-2018, 08:25 AM
 
3,365 posts, read 1,781,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Now you run into school attendance policies. Most public schools, if not all of them, aren't going to admit an out of area student to a limited program on the promise of a pending move into the district.
I would still want residency required before finally admitting the child. So if a child won the lotto, the child's parents MUST move to the district for the child to get admitted. If not, the spot is given to the next random winner who also must meet thereafter the residency requirement.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 09:42 AM
Status: "Tinsel, not just for decoration" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,550 posts, read 39,948,785 times
Reputation: 41213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
I would still want residency required before finally admitting the child. So if a child won the lotto, the child's parents MUST move to the district for the child to get admitted. If not, the spot is given to the next random winner who also must meet thereafter the residency requirement.
But that's not how the system works in most places. Remember that school administrators are responsible to the school board which, in most places, is responsible to the voters/residents in the district.

Most school systems with a competitive admission program have a surplus of qualified applicants so there is no compulsion to admit out of district students who maybe, might, move to the area.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 10:05 AM
 
49,530 posts, read 40,034,586 times
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OP, in case it hasn't been mentioned...at my kids schools the IB and AP courses are weighted +1 towards GPA. So the highest class ranks etc. are kids that did the whole IB\AP thing.

You can also do "partial IB" which one of my kids did because they had other interests that conflicted with full IB.

Best of luck, I'd call up the CURRENT school and talk to their gifted program teacher\advisor.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 10:11 AM
 
5,755 posts, read 5,205,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
Once kids are in high school, they are finally allowed to self-sort into honors and AP classes. This is why you can walk through a school that is 50% or more minority, but the classes are not integrated, because the kids self-sort into their academic level. So any high school that has a lot of AP classes, and good teachers, would allow a kid access to an excellent education in high school. Sometimes, diligent kids can earn two years of college credit while in high school.
I'm going to gently push back at this for 2 reasons:

1. It's not really "self selected" IMO, it's more like tracked and it started in middle school usually. Kids have to be prepped for honors/advanced work, if they arrive at high school underprepared it's already too late for most to end up in an AP class.

2. All AP classes are not the same. In theory they are all supposed to be taught the same way, but in practice any non-IB school that wants to say they are college prep HAS to offer them, even if they don't have enough kids who are really ready for AP coursework in a given subject. In some schools, what you end up with is a classroom of students who are not really ready to cover all the required material at the accelerated pace so they go slower, end up rushing through a bunch of subjects in the last couple of weeks if they get through it at all, and all the kids get 1s and 2s on the AP exam. I can't tell you how many kids I've come across that got an A in their AP class but a 2 on the exam.
TL: DR version - Make sure any HS school offering APS has a sizeable population of prepared students or your kid can end up getting screwed.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 10:49 AM
 
Location: Alexander Archipelago
3,014 posts, read 1,600,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
..My eldest is completing his Middle School this current school year and finding out High School is a different animal altogether. It didn't help I have no prior experience of HS in America.
TIA.
How was your son's education enriched by the middle school GT, and what are you both looking for from a HS?

Most bright, well adjusted kids will do fine in just about any HS setting, I believe.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 11:05 AM
 
3,365 posts, read 1,781,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
But that's not how the system works in most places. Remember that school administrators are responsible to the school board which, in most places, is responsible to the voters/residents in the district.

Most school systems with a competitive admission program have a surplus of qualified applicants so there is no compulsion to admit out of district students who maybe, might, move to the area.

Our disconnect is bolded. I am saying there is no "maybe.might". They should require it. The only thing that doesn't make sense is the timing of when to require it.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 11:12 AM
Status: "Tinsel, not just for decoration" (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,550 posts, read 39,948,785 times
Reputation: 41213
Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
Our disconnect is bolded. I am saying there is no "maybe.might". They should require it. The only thing that doesn't make sense is the timing of when to require it.
The timing may be related to scheduling and staffing. Next year's schedule, if the system is smart, has it being developed, or at least staring to, right after school starts this year. When I was teaching the kids started to sign up for next year's classes just about now. Now those schedules weren't set in stone exactly, but they did start to fill out the basic framework of the school's master schedule for next year.

The school system owes you as a nonresident no consideration. What you " may" do, which is how it has to be approached, means nothing.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 11:17 AM
 
3,365 posts, read 1,781,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blind Cleric View Post
How was your son's education enriched by the middle school GT, and what are you both looking for from a HS?

Most bright, well adjusted kids will do fine in just about any HS setting, I believe.
I think it helped in a way it continued on his path to being in the top percentile. His last State-wide exam result which was from last school year (Grade 7) still puts him in "Advanced Learner" category, which is the top category.


There was also the opportunity for him to be exposed to various activities not provided to those not in the Gifted class (e.g., he was 1 of 3 students in the entire middle school to get inducted to National Juniors Honors Society, he was 1 of 1 in the entire middle school to get mentorship by NASA, etc.).


As far as academic grades, he is still a straight A student, hence, better teachers I think.
 
Old 11-28-2018, 11:38 AM
 
5,070 posts, read 4,648,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The CollegeBoard® discourages any type of gatekeeping for admission to AP classes and has audited school systems it suspects of doing so.

Is that something new? My high school very openly did "gatekeeping" as to who was allowed in honors and AP classes.

Quote:
My worst AP year was when I had two sections of Psych with 44 kids in one class and 47 in the other. There should have been 3 or even 4 sections but due to how our schedule was built it couldn't be done.
What about when facilities cause limitations? In my middle school and high school, the science labs accommodated 24 students. If there was approximately 48 students qualified, then they could have 2 sections. But if there were, say, 26 qualified students, then 2 students would have to be somehow excluded.


Also, the high tech computer lab had only 20 computers, so any class that required use of that lab would be limited to 20 students. In at least one case, the rule was to be that 10 had to be boys and 10 had to be girls. The minimum number of students for a class to run was 13. For that class, 11 boys enrolled in that class and only 2 girls, so the class had exactly enough students to run, and nobody had to be turned away. But there was a girl (who had no interest in the class) complained, saying that it should not be allowed to run, since only 10 boys should be allowed, not 11, regardless of how few girls were interested, and with only 10 boys and 2 girls, that was not enough students for the class to run. I could never understand what was being denied to her by having that class run.
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