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Old 11-29-2018, 12:50 AM
 
33 posts, read 8,035 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
And there are many attorneys and physicians who did not do IB in high school. . .
One of mine graduated from a regular rural high school with approx. 150 kids in the class and entered a medical school program right out of high school. IB is not remotely necessary to achieve. We are personally opposed to the IB program and its agenda.

Last edited by CentralUSHomeowner; 11-29-2018 at 01:26 AM..

 
Old 11-29-2018, 01:25 AM
 
8,336 posts, read 7,308,603 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CentralUSHomeowner View Post
One of mine graduated from a regular rural high school with approx. 150 kids in the class and entered a medical school program right out of high school. IB is not necessary to achieve much in the world. We are personally opposed to the IB program and its agenda.
Med school program right out of HS?

What program is this & affiliated with what college/med school?

No snark, just curious!
 
Old 11-29-2018, 03:51 AM
 
3,365 posts, read 1,781,617 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The timing may be related to scheduling and staffing. Next year's schedule, if the system is smart, has it being developed, or at least staring to, right after school starts this year. When I was teaching the kids started to sign up for next year's classes just about now. Now those schedules weren't set in stone exactly, but they did start to fill out the basic framework of the school's master schedule for next year.

The school system owes you as a nonresident no consideration. What you " may" do, which is how it has to be approached, means nothing.
You are actually agreeing with what I said. May/might means nothing.
 
Old 11-29-2018, 07:47 AM
 
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IB, if carried to completion, is a very academic program. Depending on the school, it could meet your criteria - I know some people pick it because it kind of isolates its students from the others in the school and is a rigorous academic program. However, it may have evolved to become more inclusive in recent years - I think it may be trying to survive in numbers. Some high schools do have AP courses open to Freshmen - but maybe not all subjects because the kids have to meet prerequisites. Pre-AP is being started by College Board now but it is for all kids. Honors classes sound closest to what you want but in most schools they are not invitation only - they may be in some, though. There are also many high schools that offer college courses in high school. Sounds like you need to visit some schools, go to open houses, etc.

If your goal is to get your kid away from the non-gifted kids, most high schools don't operate that way - kids are not isolated all day from their peers and they may try a variety of courses and not stick to just one track. If you really want the isolation factor you'd be looking for something that markets itself as a gifted charter school, but your child will be left with far fewer options for courses, etc.

My advice is that if your child is going to be going to a sizable high school with a good reputation, there will be tons of highly academic options for your student, and that rather than putting your kid in a 'program' and calling it done, you will need to work with your child and school to pick courses and activities each year that suit your student's needs, but there will be plenty of suitable options.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Yippeekayay View Post
At first I thought it was Magnet Schools but apparently, those are lotteries instead of "Invites" based on academic grades.

Then there is the Advanced Placement (AP) Programs but not sure if they offer this for Freshmen or if it starts on Junior (Grade 11).

There is also an International Baccalaureate (IB) Program but reading through, it gave me an impression it is more of a cultural learning and appreciation program rather than academic.

I am looking for something straight Academic that invites qualified kids to the Program like the Gifted Programs in Elementary and Middle Schools.

My eldest is completing his Middle School this current school year and finding out High School is a different animal altogether. It didn't help I have no prior experience of HS in America.

TIA.
 
Old 11-29-2018, 11:07 AM
 
Location: tampa bay
6,511 posts, read 6,558,218 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
And there are many attorneys and physicians who did not do IB in high school. . .
You read my whole post and that was your take away Please,no where did I state that IB diploma is required to become an attorney or doctor Rather it sets a student up for academic success by helping to instill good study habits and time management!
 
Old 11-29-2018, 11:19 AM
 
5,070 posts, read 4,648,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
I've been retired four years so a couple or three years before that. CollegeBoard® has been putting a big push to have nontraditional students take AP. They've been aided by Jay Matthews and his Challenge Index.


I graduated high school in 1997. What do you mean in this context by "nontraditional students"

Quote:
As AP Coordinator I had to file a report with CollegeBoard® every year with a demographic breakdown of students enrolled and students taking the tests. You were then given an Equity score based on sex and race/ethnic group.

My school was almost all white, and the students in AP classes were mostly white and Asian.

Quote:
There were also grants from them to schools that developed strategies to enroll underrepresented groups in AP classes. It didn't help me because my underrepresented group was White males. They weren't who was meant.

I think the OP wants a program decided based entirely on academics, and not some politically correct "diversity requirements".

Quote:
The computer thing is nuts.
I could never understand why that girl didn't want the class to run. Despite her complaint, it ran anyway.
 
Old 11-29-2018, 11:22 AM
 
5,070 posts, read 4,648,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lkb0714 View Post
Then your school is the exception not the rule.

Most schools will run classes at anything above half size so they would have just had two sections of approx 13 instead of one class of 24 and one of 2. That literally makes no sense, nor would the school fill up a section before making a second.
No, my school did not have a section of 24 and a section of 2. They'd have a section of 24, and the other 2 students would be stuck in a regular class. They could have, in theory, had 2 classes of 13, but then they may have had to hire more teachers.
 
Old 11-29-2018, 11:30 AM
Status: "Epiphany Season" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,535 posts, read 99,858,091 times
Reputation: 32018
Quote:
Originally Posted by otowi View Post
IB, if carried to completion, is a very academic program. Depending on the school, it could meet your criteria - I know some people pick it because it kind of isolates its students from the others in the school and is a rigorous academic program. However, it may have evolved to become more inclusive in recent years - I think it may be trying to survive in numbers. Some high schools do have AP courses open to Freshmen - but maybe not all subjects because the kids have to meet prerequisites. Pre-AP is being started by College Board now but it is for all kids. Honors classes sound closest to what you want but in most schools they are not invitation only - they may be in some, though. There are also many high schools that offer college courses in high school. Sounds like you need to visit some schools, go to open houses, etc.

If your goal is to get your kid away from the non-gifted kids, most high schools don't operate that way - kids are not isolated all day from their peers and they may try a variety of courses and not stick to just one track. If you really want the isolation factor you'd be looking for something that markets itself as a gifted charter school, but your child will be left with far fewer options for courses, etc.

My advice is that if your child is going to be going to a sizable high school with a good reputation, there will be tons of highly academic options for your student, and that rather than putting your kid in a 'program' and calling it done, you will need to work with your child and school to pick courses and activities each year that suit your student's needs, but there will be plenty of suitable options.
Agreed! My district had an IB program when my kids were in HS (1998-2005 for two kids). We knew some kids who started in IB but did not complete the IB diploma because they wanted to take other courses that were not in the IB program, e.g. some more music courses, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Irishiis49 View Post
You read my whole post and that was your take away Please,no where did I state that IB diploma is required to become an attorney or doctor Rather it sets a student up for academic success by helping to instill good study habits and time management!
You had to end it with that little ellipse letting us infer the meaning, which was that IB helped them get into law/med school, and it might not have been possible without the IB. I was trying to point out, mostly for the benefit of the OP, who a lot of posters on here seem to have forgotten about, that it is not necessary to get an IB to go to law school, med school, or any other professional school.
 
Old 11-29-2018, 11:45 AM
 
5,070 posts, read 4,648,876 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
To clarify, I never said there was some "hidden" lottery. That's conspiracy talk.

Again, I'm not saying a conspiracy. I'm saying that when there is a resource where demand exceeds supply (in this case, honors / AP / IB courses), some method has to be used to determine who gets the resource and who does not. No matter what system is used, it's going to seem unfair and arbitrary whoever loses. Maybe it's done by a random, behind the scenes lottery. Or maybe it's done by some other criteria that would seem random to whoever loses.


I mentioned many times that my school district had a "gifted and talented" program in elementary school. Who got in was based entirely on the whim of your 2nd grade teacher. There was no other way in. Even if you moved to the district later than 2nd grade, there was no way in. My 2nd grade teacher hated me, and hated boys in general, so I did not get into the gifted and talented program, nor did any boys from my class.


When they selected who was in honors classes in 7th grade, even though I earned all A's in 6th grade science. Normally, my parents never intervened in school, but in this case, they did. They asked the school why I was not in honors science. They were told that there were more than 24 qualified students but fewer than 36, so they used as the tie breaker who was in the elementary school gifted and talented program. That seemed unfair to me, since it effectively meant that a student's 2nd grade teacher was the sole determiner of who was eligible for 7th grade honors science, 5 years later. But I do realize that any other method of reducing the number of students would have seemed just as unfair and arbitrary to whoever lost. My point was that any method is basically a random lottery, since, in this case, I had no control over who my 2nd grade teacher was and had no control over my gender.

Quote:
Since every school is different, the OP needs to talk to the guidance counselors at his son's school. It sounds like his/her son is a good student, so there shouldn't be a problem.
I think the OP had a legitimate cause for concern that his/her son may qualify academically but get a bad lottery number and not be included.
 
Old 11-29-2018, 11:51 AM
 
33 posts, read 8,035 times
Reputation: 92
Quote:
Originally Posted by Informed Info View Post
Med school program right out of HS?

What program is this & affiliated with what college/med school?

No snark, just curious!

There are several medical school programs in the United States that have a combination Bachelors/MD program. In our case, it was an extremely demanding program that is year round and does it in SIX YEARS instead of eight. No mediocre grades are allowed...or you are out. Day 1 the students are engaging in the medical school learning environment.

My oldest went on to a top 10 residency. Regardless of where one chooses to go to college or medical school, they all have to pass the SAME board tests. The real difference is how much debt you want to go into by going a particular route.

Education is the real equalizer. Rich or Poor... if you study regardless of your school and put in the effort you will do well. Don't let yourself be suckered by the "elite" attitude that you "have to" to go to a certain school or rack up a ridiculous amount of debt to be "someone" it just isn't real life.
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