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Old 12-13-2018, 09:24 AM
 
4,324 posts, read 3,352,766 times
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I studied to be a teacher, so, on paper, teaching myself shouldn't be a problem, and maybe I'm just lazy and don't want to devote the time and energy to creating my own self-study curriculum while I'm between jobs, but it seems like, regardless of how interested I claim I am in learning something, I simply cannot teach it to myself.

Some common problems / patterns I have are:

"Studying" (really just watching instructional videos and maybe completing a few simple online exercises or just guessing the answer system since it's mostly multiple choice) the subject until I'm sick of it. At the end of these sessions, I can answer multiple choice tests, but I can't really do much else.


"Learning" part of a concept but never following through on anything else. For example, I might learn the alphabet in a foreign language but never progress from there. I eventually lose interest, leave, and have to start all over again when I come back.

I live in a place very close to Mexico, so I need to learn Spanish.


I'm from an age group that is supposed to be knowledgeable about computers, so I need to learn at least one coding language.




In theory, I know how to teach myself these things, but in practice, I never get anything done and just wish I could afford a good old fashioned face-to-face class.

Last edited by krmb; 12-13-2018 at 09:36 AM..
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Old 12-13-2018, 10:00 AM
 
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You say "I need to" a couple of times. Do you actually want to? Like, really want to?
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Old 12-13-2018, 01:02 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by timberline742 View Post
You say "I need to" a couple of times. Do you actually want to? Like, really want to?
Yes, but it's just not easy.
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Old 12-13-2018, 01:38 PM
 
1,517 posts, read 549,412 times
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Find a Spanish-speaking person who needs to learn English. Teach that person English and have that person teach you Spanish.

Go Berlitz—that can be expensive face-to-face, but I think it may be less so via skype.

It sounds as though you are trying to do it alone and that is difficult. Why do you need to learn Spanish—do you have a concrete goal? It’s a beautiful language and I encourage it, but it helps to have a specific reason. If you get Telemundo, watch and turn on the Spanish subtitles as well.
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Old 12-13-2018, 02:04 PM
 
1,544 posts, read 635,544 times
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Learning works best when you have a concrete goal in mind. And it needs to be something you want to accomplish. When I was in my 20's in the late 1960's, I went to Guadalajara for an 8 day vacation. I quickly learned the phrases I needed to ask for directions to places, order food and drinks, a room, find the bathroom and pay for things in Pesos, arrange for bus and train transportation, all in Spanish, because I had to. I didn't need a language course or learn the alphabet. All I had was an English Spanish dictionary and interaction with Spanish speaking people.
If you want to learn to code, I'd ask why? Do you want to teach coding in grammar school or high school? If you definitely want to do it pick an easy language to start like Basic, and learn to print Hello World on the screen. Then learn to have the program offer you choices and you pick one. Maybe let the program make change like a cash register. Become interactive and do different things based on your input. That's the basics of coding. You don't need to learn more than how to have your program do what you want it to do. You will most likely either fall in love with coding or hate it and drop it forever.
If you want to learn to fix a blocked drain or repair a sun umbrella with a broken cord, or ceate and edit a video, you will only learn it by doing it. Youtube has step by step directions for just about everything. Knowledge for it's own sake is boring and instantly forgettable. That's why a person can attend 4 years of college and retain practically none of it over the years unless they actually use it. And very little of what is lerned is actually useful, so just about all of it is forgotten.

Quote:
Originally Posted by krmb View Post
I studied to be a teacher, so, on paper, teaching myself shouldn't be a problem, and maybe I'm just lazy and don't want to devote the time and energy to creating my own self-study curriculum while I'm between jobs, but it seems like, regardless of how interested I claim I am in learning something, I simply cannot teach it to myself.

Some common problems / patterns I have are:

"Studying" (really just watching instructional videos and maybe completing a few simple online exercises or just guessing the answer system since it's mostly multiple choice) the subject until I'm sick of it. At the end of these sessions, I can answer multiple choice tests, but I can't really do much else.


"Learning" part of a concept but never following through on anything else. For example, I might learn the alphabet in a foreign language but never progress from there. I eventually lose interest, leave, and have to start all over again when I come back.

I live in a place very close to Mexico, so I need to learn Spanish.


I'm from an age group that is supposed to be knowledgeable about computers, so I need to learn at least one coding language.




In theory, I know how to teach myself these things, but in practice, I never get anything done and just wish I could afford a good old fashioned face-to-face class.

Last edited by bobspez; 12-13-2018 at 02:15 PM..
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Old 12-13-2018, 04:16 PM
 
Location: midwest
1,358 posts, read 968,093 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by krmb View Post
I'm from an age group that is supposed to be knowledgeable about computers, so I need to learn at least one coding language.

Python



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rfscVS0vtbw


https://www.codecademy.com/learn/learn-python


You can download Python interpreters 2.7 and 3.0 for Windows and Linux for free.


There are lots of books downloadable also.
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Old 12-13-2018, 11:47 PM
 
4,324 posts, read 3,352,766 times
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I think another problem I'm having, with both computer languages and foreign languages, is I can't really stick to one thing. I've tried to study Spanish, French, and Japanese, all because I'm interested in learning the languages and think it would be nice to know them.

Same thing with coding. I signed up for tutorials in Java, Javascript, Ruby, HTML, etc. I might be getting some of the basics, but I can't seem to just stick with one thing.
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Old 12-14-2018, 09:13 AM
 
5,938 posts, read 3,170,908 times
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I think your goals are too vague and just seek to replicate the school environment you love so much. Consider: the school environment is fairly structured for you. Courses are determined for the degree. Class schedules are set. Teachers/professors assign homework and due dates. Everything is structured -- you are told what to do and when to do it.

Now translate that to being the teacher, whether of yourself or the classroom. You have to provide the structure. You have to provide the lesson plans, the due dates, everything. In that setting you are no longer told what to do and when to do it, only what to have done by the end of the semester/year.

Think of the problems you've had in the classroom that relate to being unable to provide that structure the students need. You as the teacher are unable to provide the structure that you as the student need. I recognize that you are on the spectrum and this causes these problems for you. You need the structure of the classroom or provided by an outside source. Don't know what's available in your area, so seek out local professional help.

In the meantime, look for work in a structured environment. You need to get back on your feet financially. Heck, get a job mowing grass for the school district, or as a cafeteria lady, or attendance secretary. Anything in a school district will keep you in schools, but those jobs will have the structure you need much more than a classroom teacher.
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Old 12-14-2018, 10:30 AM
 
4,324 posts, read 3,352,766 times
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Maybe. I just think it's kind of weird that I can learn things fairly easily in a classroom environment that has the structure, including real online classes (not the 'life-time access' courses that are found for low cost on websites, as there's no schedule, no deadline, no grading, no method, no credit to be earned, and no real reason to complete the coursework) but I almost feel like it's a lost cause without it. I can't seem to remember the things I'm trying to learn, and it's really frustrating to me.

Maybe you're right. Maybe the problems and frustration I'm experiencing teaching myself are related to not knowing how to teach others without structure. I'm lost on how to plan my own curriculum, what structures to use to best explain the material, where to find good resources, coming up with a realistic schedule, etc. It means that I may spend a few hours trying to gather resources, figure out my schedule, and doing other things that are already done for me in a classroom setting, and that's before I even try to learn anything!

Point taken, I guess. I can't "be my own teacher," so I guess I can't be anyone's teacher. Those Education classes missed helping me learn a big part of the job!

Is this a training issue, though, or is this just how my brain works? When I don't know how to do something, I eventually stop looking for solutions and give up. It's not worth dealing with all of the frustration.

Besides, with no realistic schedule, I can't make much progress anyway.

Last edited by krmb; 12-14-2018 at 10:51 AM..
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Old 12-14-2018, 11:45 AM
 
17,918 posts, read 15,196,158 times
Reputation: 33867
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I think your goals are too vague and just seek to replicate the school environment you love so much. Consider: the school environment is fairly structured for you. Courses are determined for the degree. Class schedules are set. Teachers/professors assign homework and due dates. Everything is structured -- you are told what to do and when to do it.

Now translate that to being the teacher, whether of yourself or the classroom. You have to provide the structure. You have to provide the lesson plans, the due dates, everything. In that setting you are no longer told what to do and when to do it, only what to have done by the end of the semester/year.

Think of the problems you've had in the classroom that relate to being unable to provide that structure the students need. You as the teacher are unable to provide the structure that you as the student need. I recognize that you are on the spectrum and this causes these problems for you. You need the structure of the classroom or provided by an outside source. Don't know what's available in your area, so seek out local professional help.

In the meantime, look for work in a structured environment. You need to get back on your feet financially. Heck, get a job mowing grass for the school district, or as a cafeteria lady, or attendance secretary. Anything in a school district will keep you in schools, but those jobs will have the structure you need much more than a classroom teacher.
I agree. OP, are you in touch with any organizations for vocational help for people on the spectrum? They can help you figure out how to explain seeking a lower level job then you're qualified for. I also think you would benefit from their help because I think you have to be honest from the get-go about being on the spectrum for your next job.


You can learn computer skills and Spanish at adult community education courses. Most of them are under $25. I took everything from ballroom dancing ($40 for 8 weeks, a bargain compared to a dance school) and also a couple of writing courses. They were taught in a local high school at night.
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