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Old 12-16-2018, 11:35 AM
 
559 posts, read 133,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
I wish we could fix this and our ISD here in Texas is considering changing the start times so high school is later and middle schools are earlier. It will not likely happen though until my granddaughter is out of high school as she is a junior this year. The reason that they can't do all the starts late is that the buses run to both middle and high school (and elementary) on staggered schedules and it would cost a lot of money to have more buses not on a staggered schedule. Our high school right now starts way too early, imo. The excuse is that kids have after school jobs and that high school sports would have a problem unless all the districts decided to do this at the same time (Texas is big on high school football).
This was the way my district operated when I attended school here. Middle school had the earliest start/release times, then elementary, high school the latest. However, for my senior year, they swapped start times for middle and high school, a schedule that has remained that way for the last 23 years.

One of the biggest reasons discussed for the swap had very little to do with high schoolers, though, and more to do with middle schoolers. Many parents and law enforcement were clamoring for later middle school release times because they found that middle school aged latchkey kids were doing stupid things and committing petty crimes due to being left unsupervised for so many hours. (There weren't many after-school programs for middle school aged kids at this time).
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Old 12-16-2018, 12:30 PM
fnh
 
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This was a serious consideration in our decision to move the kids from Houston to Seattle to attend high school, where high school start times were being pushed back to better align with teenage circadian rhythms and where a recent study showed several benefits of having done so.

https://www.seattletimes.com/educati...eye-they-need/

Our three primary high school options had the following schedules:

Houston private (our then-current school): 7:55am - 3:45pm
Seattle public: 8:55am - 3:45pm
Houston public: 7:20am - 2:40pm

The private school used a zero period beginning at 7am for electives like orchestra so we were arriving at school by 6:50am, and during the fall season my cross country runner arrived by 5:50am daily for morning practices (after-school practices being dangerous in Houston's heat). I was troubled about such early start times for my teens who, when younger, were natural early risers but who, like most kids, were becoming increasingly difficult to wake.

My kids put themselves to bed around 10-11pm every night, same as before, only now in Seattle they sleep until 8am, getting 1-3 hours of extra sleep every day. I can't point to specific metrics of improvement but as a mama I can say that the kids seem happier and healthier.

Middle schools in Seattle have the same start/end times as the high schools, elementary schools were switched to the earlier schedule in a flip with them. There were a lot of complaints about later times eating into after-school activities, but change is hard and people will always complain about it until they get used to it. Which happens pretty quickly, honestly.
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Old 12-17-2018, 08:45 AM
 
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If you unplug the television and confiscate the smartphone, game machine, & laptop at 8pm, you don't have this problem.
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Old 12-17-2018, 09:30 PM
 
559 posts, read 133,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
If you unplug the television and confiscate the smartphone, game machine, & laptop at 8pm, you don't have this problem.
And then you can follow them off to college a year later and keep doing that when they are legally adults?
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Old 12-21-2018, 07:16 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,071 posts, read 38,036,687 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fnh View Post
This was a serious consideration in our decision to move the kids from Houston to Seattle to attend high school, ...
My kids put themselves to bed around 10-11pm every night, same as before, only now in Seattle they sleep until 8am, getting 1-3 hours of extra sleep every day. I can't point to specific metrics of improvement but as a mama I can say that the kids seem happier and healthier.

...
A benefit of moving kids to WA for HS...


HS does not have to waste their time!!!
Free FT college instead of HS (since 1990) (pick your own hours ) Congratulations, you are all grown up! and will have 2 yrs less college to have to fund on your own.


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Running_Start

Early start time? Being at Dairy Farm Boarding school (up and milking by 4:30 AM 7 days / week)...

I was SO glad when 7AM finally rolled around so I could go to school. (Stinky and all)

Kids should definitely have the option of 'Shifts' in school schedule. Since schools have LIGHTS, I would elect to go to school at night! Way too many BETTER things to do during daylight. (I.e. WORK OUTDOORS!! (construction / farming trades) Fishing, hunting, gardening, biking, running...getting fresh air) SCHOOL ?
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Old 12-21-2018, 09:18 PM
 
Location: The analog world
16,556 posts, read 9,148,822 times
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Our district's high schools transitioned from first period at 7:10 to a later start time two years ago, and it has been fabulous. I had high school swimmers whose practices were before school, meaning a 4:45 wake up time to be suited up and in the pool by 5:30 on the dot. To say it was horrible for everyone in the family would be a tremendous understatement. High school now starts at 8:20, which is a much more civilized time of the morning. There was some grumbling in the beginning, but now pretty much everyone I've discussed the topic with agrees that we should have done it years ago.
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Old 12-22-2018, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
19,651 posts, read 9,258,361 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
I agree. I also live in Texas, and we have staggered start times so the buses can be reused.

Elementary starts at 7:30 (GOD) and high school starts at 9:05. Ideally, I think everyone should start at 8:30 and end at 3:30.

They'd have to have 3X the buses they do, and 3X the bus drivers. I wonder how many bus routes are full, though, so maybe they could be combined.
This was what -- at least the time I was there -- made it impossible for our district to solve the issue. It would have required our district to buy far more buses than they already owned to have somewhat uniform start times...not to mention hiring that many more bus drivers...a resource already at somewhat of a premium.
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Old 12-22-2018, 04:40 PM
 
Location: Mid South Central TX
3,171 posts, read 7,270,328 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
This was what -- at least the time I was there -- made it impossible for our district to solve the issue. It would have required our district to buy far more buses than they already owned to have somewhat uniform start times...not to mention hiring that many more bus drivers...a resource already at somewhat of a premium.
Also, traffic would be crazier than it already is. Duplicated start times would work if the schools all shared a campus, but most do not. A far better use of already limited resources to use each bus 6 x day (AM and PM x 3 schools) than to run it 2 x day.
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Old 12-22-2018, 05:34 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
27,116 posts, read 58,914,862 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MyWifiGoesSlow View Post
I don't want to cherry pick something so here is the search link itself early school starts hurt children - Google Search 100s of articles pointing out the harms.


Why can't we fix this I hated those early starts. First few hours of school just had a headache.
And the kids should be sitting down to breakfast with their parents before walking 4 blocks to the great neighborhood school.
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Old 12-22-2018, 06:36 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
40,142 posts, read 38,751,519 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hypocore View Post

The changes they expected to occur did not. Kids did not get more sleep, they just shifted everything an hour later. Also after school practices and rehearsals had to be moved to before school, so no extra sleep for those participants. First period absences did not decrease, in fact they increased.
Yep.
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