U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old Yesterday, 09:30 AM
 
21 posts, read 3,066 times
Reputation: 35

Advertisements

"Robots replace workers."

Except that many times they don't.

Since the 1970s, when automated teller machines arrived, the number of bank tellers in America has more than doubled. The introduction of compter-aided document discovery, a once labor intensive process, hasn't led to fewer paralegals and lawyers; just the opposite.

On average, since 1980, occupations with above-average technology use have grown substantially faster than occupations with below-average technology use.


Almost all economists agree that automation ultimately creates more jobs. Automation does eliminate jobs in the short term, with often painful and even permanent consequences. For the economy as a whole, however, automation drives down prices of goods and services. Humans have so far proved endlessly inventive about how to spend extra money, leading to new businesses—and more jobs.

A just-released report from the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation, one of the world’s leading science and technology think tanks, argues that the U.S. is falling behind in adoption of robots. Its new index compares the rate of adoption of industrial robots in manufacturing in different countries, while controlling for average wages of workers in those countries and industries.



The ITIF found the U.S. is adopting industrial robots well behind the “expected” rate of adoption, compared with other rich countries.

China, on the other hand, is adopting robots so much faster than everyone else that, within a decade, it could lead the world in use of robots, when controlling for wages.

Who at the birth of the digital computer during World War II would ever have predicted that by 2022, North America would have 265,000 more cybersecurity jobs than skilled cybersecurity workers, or that a single e-commerce company, Amazon, would be so big it could create a new shopping holiday?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old Yesterday, 09:31 AM
 
Location: equator
2,756 posts, read 1,200,176 times
Reputation: 6783
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Hasn't this been discussed ad nauseum? Heck, we can't even get people to acknowledge that student loans are optional.
Patience, patience. I remind you again that not all of us are as smart and gifted as you. Let us plebes muddle around in the shadow of Mt. Olympus and discuss our nauseating topics, LOL.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
9,145 posts, read 4,996,786 times
Reputation: 7812
If they asked me about a career path, I would be asking them about their marital plans. What one does can depend a lot of whether there will be one or more of one of them.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:20 PM
Status: "Failing to just lurk" (set 29 days ago)
 
Location: Massachusetts
8,970 posts, read 9,260,368 times
Reputation: 12526
I'm a mechanical engineer and a licensed electrician. I'm not sure what careeer path I would tell my children to follow. There are pros and cons to both that a lot of people in this thread have touched upon. I will say that ultimately I picked engineering as my full time gig and pick and choose my electrical jobs based on how I feel about it. I'm done digging trenches or crawling around in 150 degree attics and tend to favor control wiring.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:24 PM
Status: "Epiphany Season" (set 1 hour ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
85,522 posts, read 99,844,032 times
Reputation: 32003
Quote:
Originally Posted by TamaraSavannah View Post
If they asked me about a career path, I would be asking them about their marital plans. What one does can depend a lot of whether there will be one or more of one of them.
I'm not sure what you're getting at. There are a few jobs that require lots of traveling, e.g. being a member of a very popular musical group, etc, but that's not in the cards for most people. Other than that, I can't think of anything, though I'm sure there are other jobs out there that require one to be away from home a lot. Actually, now that my juices are flowing, my nephew has a finance job that has required a lot of travel the past few years, however, it's settling down. Please explain what you mean.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:38 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
9,145 posts, read 4,996,786 times
Reputation: 7812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
I'm not sure what you're getting at. There are a few jobs that require lots of traveling, e.g. being a member of a very popular musical group, etc, but that's not in the cards for most people. Other than that, I can't think of anything, though I'm sure there are other jobs out there that require one to be away from home a lot. Actually, now that my juices are flowing, my nephew has a finance job that has required a lot of travel the past few years, however, it's settling down. Please explain what you mean.

Well, I am in a job that requires a HS diploma and not all the degrees that I have to do it and I live very comfortably.



There is no way I could live in this job, however, if I was married, had children, was trying to have the money for college (perhaps), weddings, what is the tech gift of the year for Christmas, insuring junior drivers.....etc, etc, etc..


I think it is rather clear the difference of occupations whether one is single or married.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:39 PM
 
860 posts, read 466,734 times
Reputation: 3343
College debt is a big consideration, but going into a trade also has its downside. It's fine when you're 25 to do heavy physical work but try being 45 and crawling into someone's attic when it's 100 in the summer (a/c work). Trades break the body down in ways other jobs do not. Starting a business today with all of the regulations and costs is not like it used to be either (compensation insurance has skyrocketed). Unless you are in a union (which are dwindling fast) you won't get the health insurance or retirement benefits either. Vacations are optional and unpaid.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Texas Hill Country
9,145 posts, read 4,996,786 times
Reputation: 7812
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coloradomom22 View Post
College debt is a big consideration, but going into a trade also has its downside. It's fine when you're 25 to do heavy physical work but try being 45 and crawling into someone's attic when it's 100 in the summer (a/c work). Trades break the body down in ways other jobs do not. Starting a business today with all of the regulations and costs is not like it used to be either (compensation insurance has skyrocketed). Unless you are in a union (which are dwindling fast) you won't get the health insurance or retirement benefits either. Vacations are optional and unpaid.

Hmmmmm, that reminds me of what it is to be a professional diver (which I am but then am not).


On the not side, one is pushing an occupation which will probably end one up walking with a cane for the pressures are that progressively destructive on the body.


On the side I am, shallow water, I went through essentially a 15ish apprentice program. Unofficially on one side but possible to see it as such since I was under the wing and patronship of a professional all that time.


One thing about having a patron; it behooves you to follow in their example, accept their beliefs as your own.


There are costs along the way.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 12:57 PM
 
9,552 posts, read 11,419,700 times
Reputation: 12846
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
My daughter has a master degree, works at a hospital in her field and makes two thirds of what a plumber makes in her town of Reno. She has a boatload of student loan debt. The plumber has little if any student debt.


I'm not talking about some hamburger flipper or laborer. I'm talking about someone who learns a skill in the trades. How many college grads do you know making $80,000-$150,000 a year? some, but not all. I'm not saying one should not get a college degree. What I'm saying is one should consider all options and not think that college is the only option to making a good living.
A couple things to consider:

1. Trades tend to hit a max salary early in their career. Trades don't seem to break through a wage ceiling. As more people get into the trades the wages will come down (supply/demand).

2. Trades are physical labor jobs, at some point you may be forced to retire even if you didn't plan on it.

Office job may have a ladder to climb to earn more. Trades might not.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old Yesterday, 01:19 PM
 
1,566 posts, read 644,835 times
Reputation: 3975
This glosses over a lot of realities not being considered. The trades are fine when you are young, not so great after 20 or 30 years when they have taken a big toll on your body. People in trades often branch out on their own and run their own business. But not everyone is a businessman. You need to be a businessman as well as a tradesman to make money in your own business. Others have union jobs that get them less and less work as they get closer to retirement. Making any career decision based on projected income/debt is a very poor choice. The best choice is to find something you like and do that, as long as it pays a decent wage, and you can save for retirement. People keep repeating the idea of huge college debt. But living at home and commuting to local public colleges or universities, and working part time during the school year and full time in the summer, shouldn't leave anyone with a 4 year college debt more than the note on a nice new car. True a degree doesn't guarantee anyone a job or a career. You need to pick a field you like, can be good at, and that pays a decent wage. You have to go after that yourself and figure out how to get there, the same as you would if you were in business for yourself.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
about a career path I would say, well you can either go to college rack up a boatload of student debt and maybe not find a job in your chosen field or worse yet find yourself working at Starbucks.

Or consider the trades. Minimal student debt, one to two years of education (and in certain programs, they pay you after the first year) and you can live anywhere and make good money, plus you can easily find a job. In my area electricians and plumbers make $80,000 to $100,000 a year. My auto mechanic owns four houses and he is his own boss working 40 hours a week.


I even saw an article about painters and maintenance workers in urban areas making close to $150K a year.


For the record I am a college grad. But 30 years ago having a degree was a ticket to making a good living. Not so much today. I think high school counselors are doing kids a disservice buy say you gotta go to college to make it.

Last edited by bobspez; Yesterday at 01:27 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top