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Old 01-05-2019, 01:44 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 482,413 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Endoplasmic View Post
Both my parents were immigrants (Siciliy and Germany in the early 1900s) We only learned/spoke English
Interesting I did mention German vs German Americans, I know that they generally learn French as well as maybe another European language within Germany. The close proximity of countries and ease of access makes languages much useful. Many German Americans like your case emigrated hundreds of years and many generations ago and there isn’t many places in US that provides much exposure to the German language. I haven’t seen a Little Berlin yet, which is interesting despite German being a large ancestry group that rivals the English/Anglos within the US. Though I am more focusing on more recent immigrants ie first and second and third generations particularly from more homogenous countries where foreign language exposure within that country is rare, but exposure to the home language is more common for those who emigrated the US.

Interestingly in parts of California, Washington, and New York, its not uncommon for entire city blocks or business/shopping plazas where all the signs are of the language of the enclave with no English to be found. And they continue to grow over the years even as the generations of immigrants continue on.

Last edited by citizensadvocate; 01-05-2019 at 01:53 AM..
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Old 01-05-2019, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Coastal California
209 posts, read 301,568 times
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My grandparents and my Dad would speak in Norwegian at home and of course at the Lutheran church. My siblings and I were never taught the language. We were told from a very young age "You are American. You will speak English" (although I do know the curse words!)
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Old 01-05-2019, 11:30 AM
 
1,110 posts, read 482,413 times
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Its also Interesting to learn that lack of foreign language proficiency isn't just an Anglo American issue in North America. Though does Canada do better with foreign language education particularly French? Since French is one of the official languages. Ironically US does not have an de jur official language at all. Though isn't more concerning that people with of a background of a home language are losing home language in the US, as opposed to Anglo Americans or other Americans struggling to learn a new foreign language?

I also be curious about immigrants to south of the border or the English/Spanish dividing line. How well are their kids in been biligual, I know that Mexico is not a very English friendly place, therefore there are alot of places there with no English outside of touristy places and shops therefore many migrants from Mexico no pretty much no English.

Last edited by citizensadvocate; 01-05-2019 at 12:10 PM..
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Old 01-05-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: The Driftless Area, WI
2,046 posts, read 739,026 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Blue Skies View Post
My grandparents and my Dad would speak in Norwegian at home and of course at the Lutheran church. My siblings and I were never taught the language. We were told from a very young age "You are American. You will speak English" (although I do know the curse words!)

My Volga Deutsch father was born here but didn't learn English until he started school. Church services were all in German as was most everyday business in the neighborhood. He & his friends all became White Sox fans despite living just 2 miles from Wrigley Field because the Sox were in The American League.


My mother, OTOH, learned English from her Sicilian parents who immigrated as children and quickly learned English themselves. They didn't teach any of their nine kids to speak Italian because being Italian was a less than favorable status in Depression Era Chicago outside the 'hood (as if they could hide their nationality when going to school with garlic necklaces strung about their necks to ward off germs, and round, flat lunch boxes to hold the pizza)
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Old 01-05-2019, 01:48 PM
 
Location: Ft. Myers
16,595 posts, read 10,186,557 times
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My Grandfather came over from Czeckloslavakia, and he and my dad conversed in Russian a lot when I was a kid. I never learned one word, and even today only know a couple. My dad and mom felt we were living in America and needed to speak English.
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Old 01-05-2019, 03:03 PM
 
Location: ATL -> HOU
4,171 posts, read 3,315,473 times
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My great-grandfather was Czech and immigrated to Texas (as did a lot of Czechs). As far as I know, my grandfather doesn't speak a word of Czech and I really have no connection, nothing cultural passed down through the generations. Even our last name was truncated and "Americanized".

Now, I do know that a lot of Czechs in Texas kept some traditions at least to a limited degree. But it seems to be fairly small in the grand scheme of things. On the other side, I have a few friends whose parents or grandparents came over to the US from Mexico or other Latin American countries. Despite growing up in the US, they still are fluent in Spanish and I think even want to pass that on to their kids. I also know a lot of their customs are being passed on. Particularly in the kitchen. It's interesting to see the difference and I can't really explain it
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Old 01-05-2019, 06:24 PM
 
417 posts, read 135,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sedimenjerry View Post
My great-grandfather was Czech and immigrated to Texas (as did a lot of Czechs). As far as I know, my grandfather doesn't speak a word of Czech and I really have no connection, nothing cultural passed down through the generations. Even our last name was truncated and "Americanized".

Now, I do know that a lot of Czechs in Texas kept some traditions at least to a limited degree. But it seems to be fairly small in the grand scheme of things. On the other side, I have a few friends whose parents or grandparents came over to the US from Mexico or other Latin American countries. Despite growing up in the US, they still are fluent in Spanish and I think even want to pass that on to their kids. I also know a lot of their customs are being passed on. Particularly in the kitchen. It's interesting to see the difference and I can't really explain it
Interesting to see whether it's cultural or generational...
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Old 01-05-2019, 08:51 PM
 
Location: WI
2,839 posts, read 3,111,879 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citizensadvocate View Post
Interesting I did mention German vs German Americans, I know that they generally learn French as well as maybe another European language within Germany. The close proximity of countries and ease of access makes languages much useful. Many German Americans like your case emigrated hundreds of years and many generations ago and there isnít many places in US that provides much exposure to the German language. I havenít seen a Little Berlin yet, which is interesting despite German being a large ancestry group that rivals the English/Anglos within the US. Though I am more focusing on more recent immigrants ie first and second and third generations particularly from more homogenous countries where foreign language exposure within that country is rare, but exposure to the home language is more common for those who emigrated the US.

Interestingly in parts of California, Washington, and New York, its not uncommon for entire city blocks or business/shopping plazas where all the signs are of the language of the enclave with no English to be found. And they continue to grow over the years even as the generations of immigrants continue on.
Interesting article about the prevalence of German in a small Wisconsin town:
https://www.npr.org/templates/story/...ryId=102523977
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Old 01-05-2019, 09:56 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,393 posts, read 7,697,105 times
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I live in an area that is has a massive percentage of immigrants.

Many barely speak English and rely on their children to translate English to Spanish or live in neighborhoods that are completely Spanish speaking. As in even the DMV has no English speakers.
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Old 01-05-2019, 10:08 PM
 
417 posts, read 135,235 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by blueherons View Post
I live in an area that is has a massive percentage of immigrants.

Many barely speak English and rely on their children to translate English to Spanish or live in neighborhoods that are completely Spanish speaking. As in even the DMV has no English speakers.
That's always been very common with 1st generation immigrants. I've never seen anyone born and raised in the USA struggle with being able to communicate in English though.
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