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Old 01-06-2019, 03:43 AM
 
Location: NYC
33 posts, read 25,526 times
Reputation: 28

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We need to enforce the requirement of reading, writing and speaking English as a requirement of gaining citizenship.

And to that end, election ballots should only be in English.

And build the wall.

Www.House.gov
Www.Senate.gov
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Old 01-06-2019, 08:39 AM
 
Location: Central IL
13,983 posts, read 7,570,745 times
Reputation: 32547
Quote:
Originally Posted by citizensadvocate View Post
Interesting I did mention German vs German Americans, I know that they generally learn French as well as maybe another European language within Germany. The close proximity of countries and ease of access makes languages much useful. Many German Americans like your case emigrated hundreds of years and many generations ago and there isnít many places in US that provides much exposure to the German language. I havenít seen a Little Berlin yet, which is interesting despite German being a large ancestry group that rivals the English/Anglos within the US. Though I am more focusing on more recent immigrants ie first and second and third generations particularly from more homogenous countries where foreign language exposure within that country is rare, but exposure to the home language is more common for those who emigrated the US.

Interestingly in parts of California, Washington, and New York, its not uncommon for entire city blocks or business/shopping plazas where all the signs are of the language of the enclave with no English to be found. And they continue to grow over the years even as the generations of immigrants continue on.
The Amish and some Mennonites speak German or various dialects, especially in the home and within their own community though English is taught in their schools. There are communities in Ohio, Indiana, and Pennsylvania mainly.
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Old 01-06-2019, 11:30 AM
 
12,129 posts, read 16,845,955 times
Reputation: 17484
Quote:
Originally Posted by citizensadvocate View Post
Interesting I did mention German vs German Americans, I know that they generally learn French as well as maybe another European language within Germany. The close proximity of countries and ease of access makes languages much useful. Many German Americans like your case emigrated hundreds of years and many generations ago and there isnít many places in US that provides much exposure to the German language. I havenít seen a Little Berlin yet, which is interesting despite German being a large ancestry group that rivals the English/Anglos within the US. Though I am more focusing on more recent immigrants ie first and second and third generations particularly from more homogenous countries where foreign language exposure within that country is rare, but exposure to the home language is more common for those who emigrated the US.

Interestingly in parts of California, Washington, and New York, its not uncommon for entire city blocks or business/shopping plazas where all the signs are of the language of the enclave with no English to be found. And they continue to grow over the years even as the generations of immigrants continue on.
"I know that they generally learn French as well as maybe another European language within Germany" is not correct. Second and third language is based on career path early on - as early as 5th grade.
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Old 01-06-2019, 11:37 AM
 
Location: East of the Mississippi and South of Bluegrass
4,228 posts, read 3,501,708 times
Reputation: 8983
My husband and his brother were immigrants and we agreed early on that I would not teach the children his language (my ability to speak, read and write his language was not proficient enough at that time to correctly do them any justice. After living there for a year it was excellent; reading, writing and speaking).

All of my children speak, read and write three languages; their father's as well as English (and Spanish through the American school system, primary, secondary and college).

That is because we promoted language and insisted they learn as many as possible but different families have their own views on the matter.

ETA: My husband and his brother both learned to speak, read and write English on their own.
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Old 01-06-2019, 02:08 PM
 
12,014 posts, read 9,871,170 times
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When my great grandparents came from Italy, they wanted to assimilate and be American. My grandparents didn't teach my dad and his siblings Italian or give them Italian names because they were American. In hindsight, I wish they had spoken Italian at home, they could have, and then I could have learned, but they didn't and we can't change it now. But there was a desire to come to America and be American, not to retain a lot of the previous culture. It was a conscious decision and effort by a lot of immigrants at the time. I'd say the traditions that did stick really involve food and holidays, some stuff about religion, but the language was intentionally abandoned by subsequent generations, at least in my case.

I took Spanish in school but it didn't stick, I think I needed it spoken at home to stick, or more rigorous teaching. I can read in Spanish, or at least get the gist of what's being said, but can barely speak it and cannot understand it if it's spoken. Spanish would be the most useful language for me out of any other, but I don't NEED it and have never felt like I needed to know another language other than English. I just wouldn't use it enough.
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Old 01-06-2019, 05:40 PM
 
1,110 posts, read 482,413 times
Reputation: 800
Quote:
Originally Posted by JerseyGirl415 View Post
When my great grandparents came from Italy, they wanted to assimilate and be American. My grandparents didn't teach my dad and his siblings Italian or give them Italian names because they were American. In hindsight, I wish they had spoken Italian at home, they could have, and then I could have learned, but they didn't and we can't change it now. But there was a desire to come to America and be American, not to retain a lot of the previous culture. It was a conscious decision and effort by a lot of immigrants at the time. I'd say the traditions that did stick really involve food and holidays, some stuff about religion, but the language was intentionally abandoned by subsequent generations, at least in my case.

I took Spanish in school but it didn't stick, I think I needed it spoken at home to stick, or more rigorous teaching. I can read in Spanish, or at least get the gist of what's being said, but can barely speak it and cannot understand it if it's spoken. Spanish would be the most useful language for me out of any other, but I don't NEED it and have never felt like I needed to know another language other than English. I just wouldn't use it enough.
Interesting some to learn about the concentration of German language in the US from some of the posters. Though aside from the few areas mentions it appears German is not a too useful language in the US.

I guess in New Jersey the most use of Spanish is those who have relations and connections with Puerto Rican’s particularly in the NYC metropolitan area. But not nearly as much use as places near the border or in south Florida.

I notice that for Europeans who immigrate to America including some of the posters here I notice this group seem to intentionally want to dump their identity to blend into and become a part of Anglo white America.

But for those from the Far East or non Causasion parts of the world due to their skin color and other vast differences including culture they seem to get stuck in a no mans land where they can barely understand their own language but are not really accepted by mainstream Anglo population. A pretty sad situation.
I noticed most parents from this group, often unlike the ones from Europe, does want to maintain the language and culture of old country however getting the children and grandchildren to keep their language, is very difficult since children can be rebellious and think that it’s not “kewl,” to make effort in addition the culture of oppression and having other languages looked down upon is also a major obstacle.
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Old Today, 03:42 PM
 
2,108 posts, read 1,506,046 times
Reputation: 3260
Quote:
Originally Posted by AlaskaErik View Post
I'm a first generation American who speaks English as a second language. My parents came to this country in the early 50s and settled right into a typical American neighborhood, so no ethnic enclave for us. I learned English right after I started kindergarten, although I have no recollection of the process. According to stories my mother told people later on, I picked it up in a couple of weeks. Today, I know a few phrases of my first language, but could never hold any type of a conversation. Basically, I can say hello, good bye and I can order a beer, although I couldn't be any more specific than "beer". Forget about a brand or a type. To hear me talk, you'd never know English is my second language.
Sounds like English has long since become your ONLY language, so it's weird to see you refer to it as "my second language." "My second language" implies that you fluently know TWO languages, which you say you don't. But I know what you mean, though.

What is your native language, if you don't mind me asking?
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