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Old 01-09-2019, 08:56 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OK, so maybe it was a thing in your state or district, which is very interesting, that they did that. But it wasn't common across the US.
I started teaching in 1984 and we did it then. Career interest surveys of one type or another have been common for decades in high school.

https://www.thebalancecareers.com/th...ventory-526173

It may be that schools are now notifying parents for an opt out. I will tell you that most kids, even today, will take a survey and not even know what it is. Or care.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:12 AM
 
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The thing to remember is who your child is at age 16 isn't going to be who they are at 25 or 35. For most people, there isn't one single career for them. They will change occupations many times.
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Old 01-09-2019, 09:23 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,745 posts, read 40,156,796 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
The thing to remember is who your child is at age 16 isn't going to be who they are at 25 or 35. For most people, there isn't one single career for them. They will change occupations many times.
Yeah. They're mainly given to get the kids thinking about what they might want to do and get them to focus a bit, not to tie them into something.
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Old 01-09-2019, 03:09 PM
 
Location: Michigan
149 posts, read 79,799 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
The thing to remember is who your child is at age 16 isn't going to be who they are at 25 or 35. For most people, there isn't one single career for them. They will change occupations many times.
True. All I know is that when I was young I think I may have benefited from taking the assessment. I went into college without much direction and changed my major around too many times. College is very expensive now and I think it would be wise for him to have some kind of direction.
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Old 01-09-2019, 06:21 PM
 
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They gave them to everyone when I was in high school. Hard to remember that far back, but seems like we did one in 8th grade which they used for high school guidance and another around Junior/Senior year to help kids decide between Vo-tech and college. This was the 70s in SC.
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:01 PM
 
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I took a few in high school. They kept telling me I should go into agriculture... which I have no interest, experience, knowledge, or skill in. I guess because I probably said I liked nature or something?

As far as I can tell, these kinds of tests probably tell you what you like... which you probably already know... but doesn't do you any good if you also know you don't want to make a career out of whatever that is and need to figure out something else.

My advice, from one person who didn't know to another: choose wisely. If you don't know and could end up doing anything, then pick something that will get you a job easily (no "you graduate from college and then find out the entry-level jobs want 10 years of experience" or "you graduate from college and find out either that this field is dying or it's so rare there are 10 jobs in the entire country. in the middle of nowhere") and something you can imagine doing for most of your waking hours for most of the rest of your life without hating your life or dreading every day. And don't pick a general-seeming major that you think will be broad enough to cover many things, but ends up being good for nothing at all.


Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
The thing to remember is who your child is at age 16 isn't going to be who they are at 25 or 35. For most people, there isn't one single career for them. They will change occupations many times.
That may be true, but it's also highly-likely they can only afford to get one degree, so it had better be something they can use to get a job, and a job they can stand, unless they want to go back to school for another or change careers to something that doesn't need a degree or that they already have so much experience in that it doesn't matter.
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Old 01-09-2019, 07:32 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,183 posts, read 38,186,371 times
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we took them in Colorado schools (May have been optional)

I know it was before or during Jr High and HS (HS is way too late)

but I still take them every few yrs to gauge my skills / interests / opportunities. (things change in 50+ yrs) jobs and self...

Just go to Worksource (unemployment office) or Jr College.

Probably plenty free online (If you happen to have internet...).

I'm all for 'indenturing' kids at age 12 - 14 into skilled career training. Even if they end up 'college bound' they will bring some content to the table and have EXPERIENCES to share with others and with their chosen path in life.

Dairy Farm Boarding school was an interesting (and probably the roughest) time in my life. But as with all hurdles... it helped prepare me for the hxll that was around the corner. (and for next 30+ yrs)

Very important in guiding my own career and my kids... Get them out for informational interviews and volunteer opportunities in a variety of career fields (while late elementary and Jr high age).

We explored a lot of potential options for our kids... an 'international' Smorgasbord. served them well.

at age 14, I spent a week at Caterpillar Tractor in Peoria with a hostess who took me to all the factories... I liked the one where 'old world' patternmakers were building violins and instruments on their lunch break. Joined up with that career path (through many barriers such as 400 applicants and 5 openings, of which 4 went to minorities...), but I endured the apprenticeship (including lots of teasing / physical smacks, and much humiliation, the career (and 'practical' education) served my family very well. (single earner (hourly) income for life, very well paid and appreciated and extremely engaging / challenging / interesting with great contributions (U.S. patents and such) )

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 01-09-2019 at 07:47 PM..
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Old Today, 07:29 AM
 
Location: Maryland
1,093 posts, read 326,607 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Unsworth View Post
Has anyone ever had their child take a career assessment (aptitude) test in high school to help them become aware of possible careers they might like to pursue? How did it work for you?
I was actually tested at one time because I was thinking of switching careers. The psychologist I saw specialized in vocational counseling (worked at a local college). He gave me a variety of tests but the most interesting one was the Strong Vocational Interest Test (https://careerassessmentsite.com/tes...est-inventory/).

I was working in research labs as a biologist at the time and, at the urging of a friend, was considering biotech patent law. He had graduate work in environmental studies but switched to law at the end. Anyway, this test works by accumulating large amounts of data from employees in various fields about the kinds of things they like. They look at people who like their careers and what kinds of other things they like. The test then basically asks you what kinds of things you like and matches it back to others who are happy in their careers and like the same things.

The top three hits on my test were:

1. Psychologist
2. Patent attorney
3. Biologist

I was pretty impressed at the “accuracy” of two of the picks but also a bit surprised by the top pick.
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