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Old 01-15-2019, 05:07 PM
 
1,504 posts, read 602,349 times
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I'm sorry, but most of this whole list is absurd. Robots and computers will be doing everything for us? Nope. The only thing that makes sense is cursive, though I'm surprised that you didn't say that children won't need to write anymore because they'll be typing everything into a tablet or computer at school (including pre-schoolers!).

No more needing to sing well because of Autotune? Children won't vacuuming or mop because of robots? Don't need to drive because of self-driving cars? Hard to believe, but robots (i.e., a computer) won't do everything you want it to do. When you're trying to command a robot to mop a corner and it doesn't go where you want it to go, you might as well do the job yourself because it'll be faster and less frustrating.

Typing and thumb typing??? The only electronic device we're going to type into is a smartphone??? Of course people need to type!!! You can't be talking to the computer's microphone all the time and besides, if you mumble, it'll hear wrong and the wrong word will come out. You might as well type it yourself to be more accurate. Besides, if everyone uses voice recognition, the room will be so loud and everyone can hear what you're doing, and no one will like that. And if everyone is talking at the same time, how can the computer's microphone hear you?

To answer the question:

Write a check. Everything is pay online. My 28-year-old co-worker didn't know how to write a check when he started with the company.

You can even argue cash because people are using credit cards to pay, but cash is still useful.
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Old 01-15-2019, 10:39 PM
 
2,016 posts, read 1,226,307 times
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That list seems like it might be for the next generation of kids not born yet, maybe, or maybe even the one after them until stuff like self-driving cars and automatic shoe tie-ers etc. become ubiquitous.

First thing that popped into my head was how to use a library card catalog, but that's probably already totally obsolete.
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Old 01-16-2019, 02:59 AM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,972 posts, read 2,529,491 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BostonMike7 View Post
I disagree on many of these. While I agree that progress is being made, I don't see it being immediately available to everyone. Unless many lower income families today have a drastic change in economic status, I don't see self-driving cars, and robotic robots and lawnmowers as something everyone will have in 15 years or so....just the well-to-do's.

I also think that people will still do some of these things just because. My wife would crucify me if I ever suggested she buy a pre-packaged meal and cook that instead. I have some vintage cars that my young children have expressed interest in driving. Some have manual transmissions. They will learn to drive them if they want.

15 years comes quick. I know society is making progress, but I don' think it will be as quick as everyone thinks. I distinctly remember when I was 10 years old being told they might have flying cars by the time I got my license. I'm still waiting for my flying car.

I agree with your disagreement on these activities. Many people will always take pleasure in doing many of these things for themselves. And I wouldn't trust a computer-driven machine to do a lot of them, where safety and survival are involved. And certainly, if many of these automated devices are produced, the majority of people will not be able to afford them. Those who talk the loudest about how great all these contraptions are, are those who would profit from selling them. It's mostly a bunch of hype, to suggest that our way of life will be patterned around them.
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Old 01-21-2019, 11:02 PM
 
7,808 posts, read 8,261,357 times
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Plenty of hiking and work boots still require the ability to tie laces. This summer's fashion trend for women included sandals with laces that wrapped around the legs and tied like ancient Greeks.
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Old 01-22-2019, 08:22 AM
 
8,031 posts, read 3,178,355 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Murk View Post
That list seems like it might be for the next generation of kids not born yet, maybe, or maybe even the one after them until stuff like self-driving cars and automatic shoe tie-ers etc. become ubiquitous.

First thing that popped into my head was how to use a library card catalog, but that's probably already totally obsolete.
Interesting. Our library system doesn't use a paper catalog - they have computer monitors in the library with the catalog on them.

We did, though, go to the history center to try to find the history of our property and had to use microfiche. Blast from the past.
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Old 01-22-2019, 10:00 AM
 
5,361 posts, read 2,422,569 times
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Recently discussed this as my grand child is entering the modern curriculum.
Correct: long form math is no longer encouraged or instructed.
Cursive writing...nope. kids are given in 1st grade a chrome book . They now do basic instruction on using the mouse and opening programs.
Typing by old keyboard ...nope.

While reading in its basic form is necessary to read the screen. No longer do they have etymology of words...or phonics. My grand kid can tell you what the emojis mean but not spell the word "happy" . Because the emojis does the expression.

Forget about fractions.

My grand son is entering 11th grade. His upbringing on cars is....Someone will buy me a triple A membership...so why do I need to know how to change a tire. He seriously thinks us elders are archaic in this world of technology.

While I marvel at modernization ....technology. I still think something was cast to the side to get there. Reading comprehension ....the journey to knowledge has lost its zest. Instantaneous answers ....via Internet searches.
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Old 01-22-2019, 10:52 AM
 
Location: Teach an Fhir Bholg
12,162 posts, read 13,500,874 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daprara View Post
maybe less religion
I would agree, and I'm surprised that the list is so focused on things and ignores a huge mass of intellectual and social changes that are just as likely to occur.

But that may be an indication of how much slippage there has already been in these latter areas.
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Old 01-22-2019, 04:09 PM
 
873 posts, read 480,954 times
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Cursive writing, driving a stick shift and changing your own oil are all things I agree with.

There are things that people remember fondly but if they are honest they don't use those things themselves. I know many who lament the death of cursive yet they don't use it. They type emails, texts, or print on a card. Same with driving a stick. They'll sneer that young people don't know how yet they themselves haven't owned a stick shift since high school. And there is really no virtue in changing your own oil as the costs of doing it yourself (if you add in paying for proper disposal because of environmental laws) isn't much of a savings. Plus many new cars are designed to make do-it-yourself oil changes quite difficult.

Sort of reminds me of the response received when Toys R Us announced they were closing. So many responded with sadness yet probably hadn't set foot in a store for years.
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Old 01-22-2019, 07:11 PM
 
5,726 posts, read 926,140 times
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- Looking up facts or learning how to do something via a book. (Examples: recipe books, almanacs, encyclopedias)

- Knowing how to read a paper road map to get to an unfamiliar and long distance destiantion

I would also suspect knowing how to tie a man's necktie in the not-too-distant future. (I'm actually surprised that men still wear traditional suits.)
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Old 01-22-2019, 10:26 PM
 
8,358 posts, read 7,392,105 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
Yeah - tying shoes.

I have a story about this. About a block away from me lived a family with a number of issues working against them. Because of this I perceived of their children as neglected and used to do a little something with one or the other of them and sometimes all of them in the summertime.

The youngest was always walking around with his tennies untied and when I learned that he didn't know how to tie them I thought to teach him how. That would only take about a week, right? Guess not. We're talking slow learner here.

He struggled; I struggled. But finally he got it. Hooray! Joy and jubilation!

Imagine how disgusted I was when he showed up the night before school started with his new Velcro tennies saying, "Look, Lodestar - I don't have to tie my shoes anymore."

Maybe that's a good thing but I'm not sure. Somehow it felt like low expectations to me.
Kid could have been dyslexic or had some other info processing disorder which would hinder his ability to tie the laces of his sneakers or any other shoe that needed tying of the laces.

And yes, even after getting it "right" a few times.
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