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Old 01-19-2019, 06:05 PM
 
Location: Log "cabin" west of Bangor
5,577 posts, read 6,548,615 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
I think it's fine, but it's also sad that hunting and firearm safety which used to be taught by father figures (and supplemented by the Boy Scouts in many cases) is now taught by a government agency.
*Now* taught?

Quote:
The Office of the Director of Civilian Marksmanship (DCM) was created by the U.S. Congress as part of the 1903 War Department Appropriations Act. The original purpose was to provide civilians an opportunity to learn and practice marksmanship skills so they would be skilled marksmen if later called on to serve in the U.S. military. Formation was precipitated by adoption of the M1903 Springfield rifle as the national service arm.
You can also buy surplus rifles and .22 rifles, and practice ammunition may be subsidized.

I participated in the program from age 12 to age 17, when I enlisted in the Army. The DIs were not dismayed to find that I was already an expert marksman, and that I was, or easily became, proficient with every weapon they put in my hands.

There is a High School near me that has a rifle team, and maintains their own practice range.

Last edited by toobusytoday; Yesterday at 08:59 PM.. Reason: Please only quote a few sentences
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:34 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,870 posts, read 40,253,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tgbwc View Post
I am kind of surprised this is even newsworthy. I went to k-12 in Ohio and college in PA. Gun safety classes weren't unusual. When I first started teaching here in a suburban DC district we had gun safety lessons in elementary school (those have ended). Our local high schools have rifle teams.
It's newsworthy because of the way a large percentage of the populace views firearms in general and kids having anything to do with them specifically.

I'd be almost willing to bet that many of those kids, both boys and girls, have been tagging along with Dad, or Mom, for years when they went rabbit/pheasant/deer/varmint hunting.

All four of my kids went out with me starting at around age five. The girls grew out of it if you will, in a few years, although both still like to shoot paper occasionally, while the boys, both grown men now, still go out with me as often as their work allows. We were in the goose blind this morning.
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:35 PM
 
1,618 posts, read 572,935 times
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"...have to say about this?"

personally, i think that just about every common thing should be 'taught' in Public Schools.
you know: home economics, civics, sex education, driver's education, guns, etc.

but, as the poster above said....schools do not even have money/time for driver's ed.
AND...schools today Teach To The Test (where the money comes from), so if Guns
are Not on the Test, it does not happen.
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Old 01-19-2019, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
4,544 posts, read 3,628,381 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by st33lcas3 View Post
Good. Teach them to respect the weapon instead of thinking of it as a toy.
Exactly.
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Old 01-19-2019, 08:31 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
2,997 posts, read 1,089,895 times
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I am mildly opposed to it as a mandatory course, because it is tantamount to endorsing guns as socially useful instruments. That is not something for the school or the state to decide.

There could also be a problem if the parent of the child is, for any reason, judicially prohibited from possessing a firearm in the household, yet the school is teaching the child how to use one with the implication that it is a good thing..

A great majority of families do not hunt and see gun use as primarily conflict resolution, either individually or collectively. It is perfectly reasonable for a family to have an objection to that, and be free of coercion to the contrary. And the schools ought to respect that.

Last edited by cebuan; 01-19-2019 at 08:44 PM..
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Old Yesterday, 07:59 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
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In fact, less than 10% of Iowans age 18-65 have a hunting license, or will ever have one, so one would really question a mandatory course aimed at such a tiny interested minority.
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Old Yesterday, 08:18 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,870 posts, read 40,253,305 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
In fact, less than 10% of Iowans age 18-65 have a hunting license, or will ever have one, so one would really question a mandatory course aimed at such a tiny interested minority.
That may well be because property owners, tenants and juvenile children of either are not required to possess a hunting license when hunting their own property. That is pretty much standard in most states.


One other thing every poster on here needs to know:

The course may be called Hunter Safety but about 75% of it has nothing to with hunting but with firearms safety. The remaining 25% is split up between hunting specific safety issues, habitat conservation and various hunting concepts (which are embodied n most state laws) such as fair chase and wanton waste.

Almost all fifty states use the same lesson plans, from a national company, slightly modified for each state.
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Old Yesterday, 11:25 AM
 
51 posts, read 7,043 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
I think it's fine, but it's also sad that hunting and firearm safety which used to be taught by father figures (and supplemented by the Boy Scouts in many cases) is now taught by a government agency.

That is because nowadays you have to have a certificate from completing the course to obtain a hunting license.
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Old Yesterday, 12:41 PM
 
5,570 posts, read 3,193,273 times
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We lived in a small town in southern MN and nearly all of us kids, both town and country, grew up knowing how to handle a firearm. A lot of the trucks parked in the high school parking lot had gun mounts in the back windows and the kids would hunt on their way to and from school. I, myself, went hunting with my father in season.

But the political climate had changed a lot by the time I had first birthed children and I made a decision to raise them "gun-free." That lasted about as long as the day I looked out the window and saw my son's friends "shooting" him with their super soakers and him "shooting" back with a twig.

When I realized that in a not-so-perfect world my children were going to be exposed to firearms despite what I wanted it made sense to me to make sure they knew gun safety. It might be only a matter of time until they were at someone's house unsupervised and someone brought a gun out to show off.

So both son and daughter went to gun safety glasses and enjoyed it. I decided with the knowledge they had to let them make their own decisions about whether they wanted to be gun owners when the time was right.
Neither are "gun nuts" and the subject doesn't come up in conversation. Their attitude is about as matter-of-fact as it was around home when I was growing up.
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Old Yesterday, 12:49 PM
 
Location: Sioux Falls, SD area
2,984 posts, read 4,453,116 times
Reputation: 4941
Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
I am mildly opposed to it as a mandatory course, because it is tantamount to endorsing guns as socially useful instruments. That is not something for the school or the state to decide.

There could also be a problem if the parent of the child is, for any reason, judicially prohibited from possessing a firearm in the household, yet the school is teaching the child how to use one with the implication that it is a good thing..

A great majority of families do not hunt and see gun use as primarily conflict resolution, either individually or collectively. It is perfectly reasonable for a family to have an objection to that, and be free of coercion to the contrary. And the schools ought to respect that.

I am too. As an elective I think that it's fine. Getting kids to think of guns as what they really are, and not a prop for a video game, is important. Yet, I believe that this should be their parent's decision.
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