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Old 01-20-2019, 04:34 PM
 
10,768 posts, read 7,845,240 times
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Why is this news? Hunter safety courses are commonplace basically teach the same thing.
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Old 01-20-2019, 05:02 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
7,887 posts, read 2,499,251 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
I am mildly opposed to it as a mandatory course, because it is tantamount to endorsing guns as socially useful instruments. That is not something for the school or the state to decide.

There could also be a problem if the parent of the child is, for any reason, judicially prohibited from possessing a firearm in the household, yet the school is teaching the child how to use one with the implication that it is a good thing..

A great majority of families do not hunt and see gun use as primarily conflict resolution, either individually or collectively. It is perfectly reasonable for a family to have an objection to that, and be free of coercion to the contrary. And the schools ought to respect that.

Millions of innocent birds, animals and people are slaughtered every year with firearms. This barbaric and archaic practice has no place in a modern, civilized society. Resources from public education should not be misappropriated to facilitate the recruitment and training of more young people to join this bloodthirsty fraternity. If it's going to be done, its perpetrators should have to provide private facilities and funding for it. And make no mistake about it, the purpose of guns is to kill. Training to be skilled at target shooting, is no more than learning to make symbolic kills.

And I should say that I was raised to be a hunter and did it with enthusiasm, beginning in grade school, in farming territory. And I became a soldier, proficient with weapons. But when I reached my mid-twenties, I had finally matured enough to realize what I was doing and stopped. But I will never solve the mystery of how I and others could do such things without conscience or self-awareness.
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Old 01-20-2019, 06:52 PM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
3,054 posts, read 1,116,483 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hunterseat View Post
Why is this news? Hunter safety courses are commonplace basically teach the same thing.
The word "required" makes it news.
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:04 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
32,933 posts, read 40,336,435 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cebuan View Post
The word "required" makes it news.
Sex Ed is also mandatory but most school systems have an opt out available.
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:11 PM
 
4,630 posts, read 2,140,166 times
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The district I worked in last year had such classes. Many of my students ( small farm community) had guns and hunted regularly. I am neutral about such classes other than agreeing with the importance of teaching safety, responsibility, so thatís a positive. My sister was in charge of NRA youth summer training camps for hunter services for an entire career. Shrug. I am for gun control. I grew up with a father, uncles and brothers who hunted. We ate well when they did. I never thought twice about it. In fact, the only memories I have about their hunting was tasting the deer and rabbit...and unfortunately seeing the hunting rifle propped up in the corner of the dining room...yikes! None of us kids ( and there were nine of us) ever touched it. We did not have a gun safe that I knew of. In fact I donít know where they were usually stored. Hunting didnít seem to Ďstickí with my brothers. They preferred fishing I suppose. Better to be educated about them. Too many are not, unfortunately.
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:13 PM
 
4,630 posts, read 2,140,166 times
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I wish archery was still taught. I enjoyed it in school. Maybe in some districts it still is???
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:21 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tangelag View Post
I wish archery was still taught. I enjoyed it in school. Maybe in some districts it still is???
Archery was included in my school's intramural program (that's not the name) designed for SPED kids. It was not an offering for regular ed kids.
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
4,605 posts, read 3,649,821 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lodestar View Post
We lived in a small town in southern MN and nearly all of us kids, both town and country, grew up knowing how to handle a firearm. A lot of the trucks parked in the high school parking lot had gun mounts in the back windows and the kids would hunt on their way to and from school. I, myself, went hunting with my father in season.

But the political climate had changed a lot by the time I had first birthed children and I made a decision to raise them "gun-free." That lasted about as long as the day I looked out the window and saw my son's friends "shooting" him with their super soakers and him "shooting" back with a twig.

When I realized that in a not-so-perfect world my children were going to be exposed to firearms despite what I wanted it made sense to me to make sure they knew gun safety. It might be only a matter of time until they were at someone's house unsupervised and someone brought a gun out to show off.

So both son and daughter went to gun safety glasses and enjoyed it. I decided with the knowledge they had to let them make their own decisions about whether they wanted to be gun owners when the time was right.
Neither are "gun nuts" and the subject doesn't come up in conversation. Their attitude is about as matter-of-fact as it was around home when I was growing up.
Sounds pretty sensible to me
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:41 PM
 
Location: Formerly Pleasanton Ca, now in Marietta Ga
4,605 posts, read 3,649,821 times
Reputation: 6272
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Millions of innocent birds, animals and people are slaughtered every year with firearms. This barbaric and archaic practice has no place in a modern, civilized society. Resources from public education should not be misappropriated to facilitate the recruitment and training of more young people to join this bloodthirsty fraternity. If it's going to be done, its perpetrators should have to provide private facilities and funding for it. And make no mistake about it, the purpose of guns is to kill. Training to be skilled at target shooting, is no more than learning to make symbolic kills.

And I should say that I was raised to be a hunter and did it with enthusiasm, beginning in grade school, in farming territory. And I became a soldier, proficient with weapons. But when I reached my mid-twenties, I had finally matured enough to realize what I was doing and stopped. But I will never solve the mystery of how I and others could do such things without conscience or self-awareness.
Some of those birds were not so innocent as my car can attest to.
I think the class can teach safety and common sense which may help reduce gun accidents. I donít like hunting myself, but own a large amount of firearms. When you talk to people or even at the gun range you can see some people really need the class for the safety of all.
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Old 01-20-2019, 07:51 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,327 posts, read 38,328,597 times
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Tho millions of farm kids have guns today and for generations past.

% of USA gun violence in rural schools / communities, or propagated by such members of society is not significant. I doubt there are too many 'examples' of how gun safety courses / shooting classes have contributed to increased gun violence.

A bit of a 'different' subject.

Similar to me living in a U.S. National Protected area. The people who watch our every move, and want to control us (forcing all kinds of trivial compliance) ... do not live or have their businesses and families here, YET are fine with controlling our lives and livelihood. Some people thrive on that and claim to be 'advocates'. I expect this is how our U.S. indigenous people feel.

You find a LOT of this 'attitude' in U.S. Edu system. (Nanny state)

Protecting their "Pig trough".
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