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Old 01-28-2019, 01:55 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,919 posts, read 5,130,631 times
Reputation: 11906

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While I'm a proponent of gun safety courses (and a gun owner), I found the reasoning the superintendent gave for adding these courses to the curriculum slightly alarming:

But Joel Foster, the superintendent for both districts, said he hoped the course will prepare students to react in the event of an active shooter situation.

"We've done everything to make (students and district employees) as safe as possible at school with cameras ... locks," he said. "We would like them to be able to deal with a situation that comes up."


"We know not all kids are going to hunt," he said. "This is an alternative to sitting on your hands and not doing anything. It's being proactive to handle things the best manner as possible if something occurs. Through education, kids know guns aren't toys."

Students should be prepared to take cover, hide, or escape in the event of a school shooter. That's the reaction they should have. Leave the disarming and taking out a school shooter to the adults - preferably trained professionals. That responsibility should not be placed on 13/14 year-old kids. Their sole responsibility should be to keep themselves safe.
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Old 01-28-2019, 02:59 PM
 
Location: Keosauqua, Iowa
9,075 posts, read 16,189,344 times
Reputation: 12079
Quote:
Originally Posted by HokieFan View Post
While I'm a proponent of gun safety courses (and a gun owner), I found the reasoning the superintendent gave for adding these courses to the curriculum slightly alarming:

But Joel Foster, the superintendent for both districts, said he hoped the course will prepare students to react in the event of an active shooter situation.

"We've done everything to make (students and district employees) as safe as possible at school with cameras ... locks," he said. "We would like them to be able to deal with a situation that comes up."


"We know not all kids are going to hunt," he said. "This is an alternative to sitting on your hands and not doing anything. It's being proactive to handle things the best manner as possible if something occurs. Through education, kids know guns aren't toys."

Students should be prepared to take cover, hide, or escape in the event of a school shooter. That's the reaction they should have. Leave the disarming and taking out a school shooter to the adults - preferably trained professionals. That responsibility should not be placed on 13/14 year-old kids. Their sole responsibility should be to keep themselves safe.
I didn't read it that way. I took him to mean that if kids have a better understanding of how guns work, they would be better able to tell things like how long it would take a shooter to reload so that they might better be able to seize an opportunity to make a break for it, not that they would be in a better position to try to take out the shooter.
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Old 01-28-2019, 04:59 PM
 
Location: Northern Virginia
4,919 posts, read 5,130,631 times
Reputation: 11906
Quote:
Originally Posted by duster1979 View Post
I didn't read it that way. I took him to mean that if kids have a better understanding of how guns work, they would be better able to tell things like how long it would take a shooter to reload so that they might better be able to seize an opportunity to make a break for it, not that they would be in a better position to try to take out the shooter.
Oh, okay. That sounds much more reasonable.
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Old 02-03-2019, 02:12 PM
 
Location: Jacksonville, FL
6,817 posts, read 7,584,912 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jtab4994 View Post
I think it's fine, but it's also sad that hunting and firearm safety which used to be taught by father figures (and supplemented by the Boy Scouts in many cases) is now taught by a government agency.
Actually, firearms safety was previously taught in schools. My elementary school had a program for 5th graders where they taught you basic marksmanship and gun safety with .22 rifles. My middle school had a similar but more in-depth program. In high school, we had about half a semester dedicated to firearms and we had a shooting club at school. Up until the late eighties and early nineties, school administrations did not react to firearms with the same irrational fear that they do today.

With the modern disdain of firearms and many parents holding a firm anti-gun stance, teaching children about gun safety is nearly a necessity. If nothing else, they will learn that a firearm is nothing but a tool - albeit a dangerous tool which should be treated with the same respect as any other dangerous tool. Children who learn to properly handle and respect firearms at a young age are far less likely to misuse them.
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Old 02-03-2019, 03:38 PM
 
Location: Worcester MA
1,641 posts, read 252,683 times
Reputation: 1598
I grew up in the Midwest where deer hunting is very popular and we would get the entire Thanksgiving week off, so the teachers could go hunting. In Junior High, we had a unit on Hunter's Safety that was taught by my math teacher. He brought his rifle to school, and we read a booklet. At the end of the unit, in order to pass, we had to take a small written test and perform a demonstration individually with the teacher's rifle to show we understood how to safely handle a gun. I have no idea if they still do this course in the schools nowadays.
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Old 02-03-2019, 06:35 PM
 
517 posts, read 223,107 times
Reputation: 1172
From what I can tell, all youths that are interested in hunting needs to take this course. Anyone, for that matter. Except for older people, unsure of the cut off age.

When you go get a hunting license, they will usually ask for your card. Which should be Hunters Orange, to show that you've been through a hunters safety course.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:55 PM
 
29 posts, read 4,264 times
Reputation: 35
It's good to trained students about this thing.
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Old 02-08-2019, 09:58 PM
 
29 posts, read 4,264 times
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It's a skill that should have in students.
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Old 02-08-2019, 10:38 PM
 
5,866 posts, read 2,637,246 times
Reputation: 5659
Quote:
Originally Posted by DeanGuitarist View Post
From what I can tell, all youths that are interested in hunting needs to take this course. Anyone, for that matter. Except for older people, unsure of the cut off age.
Do you believe that older people are intrinsically safe with firearms?

Quote:
When you go get a hunting license, they will usually ask for your card. Which should be Hunters Orange, to show that you've been through a hunters safety course.
Due to some strange circumstances, I’ve actually taken (and passed) three hunters safety courses in two different states. None of my cards are orange.
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Old 02-08-2019, 11:06 PM
 
Location: Kansas City North
3,797 posts, read 7,041,321 times
Reputation: 5109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
Millions of innocent birds, animals and people are slaughtered every year with firearms. This barbaric and archaic practice has no place in a modern, civilized society. Resources from public education should not be misappropriated to facilitate the recruitment and training of more young people to join this bloodthirsty fraternity. .
One of the primary reasons for regulated hunting is to provide for wildlife population management. In Missouri, there are so many deer and hunting helps thin out the herd. For every dead deer you see by the side of the road, there’s a totalled out car, and sometimes a dead or injured driver or passenger.
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