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Old 02-01-2019, 07:19 AM
 
Location: USA
6,213 posts, read 5,164,519 times
Reputation: 10597

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College is a YMMV ordeal. Of course, there are some majors that directly lead to high paid employment, such as medicine or computer science.

Co-worker of mind at my second job (big box store) was sick of being a shelf stocker at the big box store. So he took night classes for a BA in psychology. He quit the big box store when he got his first job as a drug and alcohol counselor ( A job that does not even require a college degree) He ended up quitting that job because it paid less and offered less benefits than he was getting at the big box store.

On the flip side, my other co-worker (who was friends with the psychology major and attended the same college) graduated with a BS in computer science and got hired on by a local tech firm making 100k+ with stock options as a programmer.
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Old 02-01-2019, 09:32 AM
 
6,870 posts, read 10,012,317 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by s1alker View Post
College is a YMMV ordeal. Of course, there are some majors that directly lead to high paid employment, such as medicine or computer science.

Co-worker of mind at my second job (big box store) was sick of being a shelf stocker at the big box store. So he took night classes for a BA in psychology. He quit the big box store when he got his first job as a drug and alcohol counselor ( A job that does not even require a college degree) He ended up quitting that job because it paid less and offered less benefits than he was getting at the big box store.

On the flip side, my other co-worker (who was friends with the psychology major and attended the same college) graduated with a BS in computer science and got hired on by a local tech firm making 100k+ with stock options as a programmer.
There are people making six figures in IT without a degree.

A BA vs. MD/DO is a strange comparison. You can't become a physician in the U.S. with only a bachelor's degree. A more direct comparison would be a psychiatrist and psychologist. A psychiatrist will make more, but psychologists are far from being poor, and their unemployment rate is low. You should know that there are people with psychology degrees who go to medical school. No specific undergraduate major is required.

I have a BA in Social Science, and I've worked with many people with bachelor's degrees in psychology. We received excellent benefits working for the government in jobs that required a bachelor's degree. We didn't make six figures, but we made more than the average person with only a high school diploma. A small percentage of the population makes more than six figures, and that's not everyone's goal.
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Old 02-08-2019, 08:01 PM
 
34 posts, read 11,373 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
OP also said she was in special ed, could not work a cash register, and likes her current job stocking shelves because she doesn't have to think very hard. This is not a description of someone who is likely to succeed in college. The fact that she doesn't want to go into debt is beside the point. This is very different from someone who did poorly in high school due to drug use, family problems or just not caring about their grades.
Yes, that's very true. I tried working as a cash register but I found it too difficult. I like the simplicity with stocking of basically "pick things up, put them down".

I just wish colleges offered some safety nets so people can try it but if it just isn't for them for whatever reason it's no big deal. A few I can think of:

1. If you attend college but end up having to drop out for any reason you don't have to worry about paying for any of it.

2. If you do graduate, you only have to pay back student loans after you have found a good job.
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Old 02-08-2019, 10:12 PM
 
31 posts, read 3,425 times
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Firstly, you have to decide that in which field do you interest. then choose the field according to your interest and get the degree.
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Old 02-08-2019, 10:15 PM
 
31 posts, read 3,425 times
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In your interested field, you can do your job comfortable.
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Old 02-09-2019, 12:11 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,495 posts, read 9,629,670 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
Yes, that's very true. I tried working as a cash register but I found it too difficult. I like the simplicity with stocking of basically "pick things up, put them down".

I just wish colleges offered some safety nets so people can try it but if it just isn't for them for whatever reason it's no big deal. A few I can think of:

1. If you attend college but end up having to drop out for any reason you don't have to worry about paying for any of it.

2. If you do graduate, you only have to pay back student loans after you have found a good job.
Oh my. Free college courses? You've got to be joking.
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Old 02-09-2019, 12:44 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,604 posts, read 38,650,805 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Oh my. Free college courses? You've got to be joking.
not really joking...Top 50 Free International Universities for U.S. Students
https://www.valuecolleges.com/intern...ree-education/
https://www.degreequery.com/free-int...-universities/

or...

I have friends / classmates (from 5 - 40 yrs ago...) who have achieved this ($xxx,xxx) in each of these careers.
https://www.moneycrashers.com/six-fi...ving-a-degree/

A fire chief friend has really had a sweet gig. + (2) full retirement pensions from 2 different states. (And currently doing his 3rd gig as Chief!) In a Colorado Mtn town

For OP... best to get right at it and find out what best fits! Many of us had 10 yrs experience / earnings in our careers by age 28. I had finished my Apprenticeship by age 24 and already making the BIG bucks! (OT 35 - 50% per yr was very lucrative. ) Worked weekends at a 2nd and third job that paid very well too.

or...
Maybe a 'late-bloomer' - many employers reimburse for degrees (Mine paid for (5) "free" degrees).
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Old 02-09-2019, 11:19 AM
 
15,611 posts, read 17,359,736 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
For the record, I am 24 and like most, I have thought about college but there are a number of concerns:

1. I don't like school as it is and never did well in high school and barely graduated as it is.
2. I have heard so many stories of people spending tens of thousands of dollars on a degree to either never use it or barely get anything.
3. I don't like the thought of having to spend so much money on it when, even with a lower paying jobI could be spending it on a lot more fun stuff instead. Imagine I did get a degree, but still got a job that may be better than minimum wage but it would be off set by having to spend a huge chunk of my paycheck for the next several years.
College is very different from high school, so it is possible that you can do better in the college environment.

Start by figuring out what career or degree you might want to pursue. What are your interests? What are your strengths?

Take an interest inventory like this one online: https://careerwise.minnstate.edu/careers/clusterSurvey
That might help you define your goals.

Then begin by taking one or two courses at a community college to see if you can do it. Once you succeed, your confidence may rise. Also, if you begin this way, it will not cost so much money. Do, however, make sure that the courses you take will transfer to any degree program you want to enter.

If college is not for you, there may be other options (someone said trade school, as an example - another might be an internship in a field you like).

Don't think about just making more money. That is important, but if you don't like the new job, more money will not make up for it.
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Old 02-15-2019, 05:36 PM
 
95 posts, read 11,758 times
Reputation: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
For the record, I am 24 and like most, I have thought about college but there are a number of concerns:

1. I don't like school as it is and never did well in high school and barely graduated as it is.
2. I have heard so many stories of people spending tens of thousands of dollars on a degree to either never use it or barely get anything.
3. I don't like the thought of having to spend so much money on it when, even with a lower paying jobI could be spending it on a lot more fun stuff instead. Imagine I did get a degree, but still got a job that may be better than minimum wage but it would be off set by having to spend a huge chunk of my paycheck for the next several years.
Think about JOBS and your future. What do you want? Long-term a good job with good pay will make your life MUCH easier. Put in the work now to reap the benefits later. Takes work. Very few people actually enjoy school, but you need a valuable skill-set to be successful in this world.

Don't get any old degree. Take on a path that will have gainful employment opportunities on the other side. Don't forget marketable trades either. Be frugal throughout your education. Avoid as much debt as possible. Even with a "good" job, large student debt often cripples.
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Old 02-15-2019, 06:20 PM
 
3,946 posts, read 7,548,691 times
Reputation: 3421
At 24 give it a shot. At least try to make it until 26. If it's not working out at least you got 2 years under your belt. With 2 years you can kind of exaggerate and fudge things on resumes and job applications. Don't use ccs. If you accumulate debt just chill and pay it off in 5 years.
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