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Old 01-24-2019, 09:51 AM
 
7,709 posts, read 8,544,669 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocko20 View Post
Don't go to college unless your heart is in it, otherwise you'll end up dropping out with a bunch of student loan debt.

College is simply not for everything, only like 30% of Americans have a college degree.
Among working age people it's closer to 40%.
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Old 01-24-2019, 10:13 AM
 
10,994 posts, read 6,206,839 times
Reputation: 11441
Quote:
Originally Posted by MisterRice View Post
No college here and I earn $35 an hour in airport operations, travel the world free, and have excellent insurance. I also own a house in South Florida and a nice car. When the new union contract comes out, Iíll be making even more, and I have not a single cent in debt to my name.

My brother has a four year degree and canít find more than temp work, so heís taking out even more money to get his Masterís. His choice.

College isnít needed for a good life.
Nice. How did you start your path to that career?

It helps others to understand that this kind of thing can be done, everyone now pushes college or you can't ever make it and it will be poverty and struggle forever. Yet, you seem to be doing quite well.
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Old 01-24-2019, 10:47 AM
 
974 posts, read 607,821 times
Reputation: 1602
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
I currently work as an overnight stocker at target, it pays better and I like how it's just easy work where you don't have to think too hard. I originally was a cashier but even that was very difficult for me so switched. Also, a bit off-topic, but I am female and though I am not really worried about getting a bf I get the impression most men today want a college educated career-focused woman.
Worst reason to go to college ever.

I say donít bother with it. If you found cashiering hard, college will be a beating. Thereís no shame in working with your hands; if a man is shallow enough to find that unattractive then youíre dodging a bullet. It is quite possible to be career focused without being college educated. One doesnít require the other.

I will say this though- aim higher. Stocking shelves wont pay the bills in a few short minutes. Learn a skill; doing hair, Nails, Beauty, Carpentry, construction, plumbing, watching kids or the elderly-something. It may require some schooling or certification but not college. Either way, at your age- you need to find something you can do for money that a 16 year old that just needs extra cash canít also do (and for less pay than you). It may not seem that important now, but it will be.

Learn a skill/trade.


And please- dont go to college.
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Old 01-24-2019, 11:10 AM
 
32 posts, read 10,882 times
Reputation: 125
Quote:
Originally Posted by kitty_nina1 View Post
I don't think college is for you since you stated previously you didn't like school and didn't do very well in high school. I wouldn't waste the money on a bachelors degree. I wouldn't even waste it on an associate's degree.
Yes, you need to go to a trade school of some sort and get a profession that's going to be in demand. Maybe, something in a medical field, like an Xray tech, occupational therapist or physical therapist. That will put you on a career path and can be helpful when you date. You won't be college educated or career focused, but you'll have a skill and a good job.
Yeah, I graduated with a 1.4 GPA. I really don't want anything in the medical field, I couldn't do that. The only good thing I can say is that unlike most I can do the same repetitive tasks over and over and never get bored, and follow simple instructions. Honestly, I wouldn't have any problem doing those assembly type jobs in places like China you see assuming it didn't come with the crazy human rights abuses; but just the job in and of itself would be no problem.
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Old 01-24-2019, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Teach an Fhir Bholg
12,286 posts, read 13,591,231 times
Reputation: 33285
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
For the record, I am 24 and like most, I have thought about college but there are a number of concerns:

1. I don't like school as it is and never did well in high school and barely graduated as it is.
2. I have heard so many stories of people spending tens of thousands of dollars on a degree to either never use it or barely get anything.
3. I don't like the thought of having to spend so much money on it when, even with a lower paying job I could be spending it on a lot more fun stuff instead. Imagine I did get a degree, but still got a job that may be better than minimum wage but it would be off set by having to spend a huge chunk of my paycheck for the next several years.
It sounds like you are being honest about yourself. And haven't you really already come to the conclusion that it is not worth your time or money?

My advice is to look at other types of education to see if they will give you a boost in life without some of the disadvantages you see in pursuing a college education.

I went to college, had two majors, and really never directly used either one. However, one of them gave me so many new windows on life that it gave me a whole new world. It didn't make me a nickle directly, but the insights, tools, views, questions, and so much else that I got from it made me a life. Large parts of my life, now that I am very close to the end of it, have their roots in that second "useless" major.

But, and it is a big one, I won a competitive scholarship....my tuition was entirely paid for four years and a very large percentage of my room and board. My summer jobs working a factory paid for a lot of the rest of my expenses. My parents paid a teensie amount of what other parents paid.

Last edited by kevxu; 01-24-2019 at 11:21 AM..
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Old 01-24-2019, 12:18 PM
 
68 posts, read 16,183 times
Reputation: 186
OP. Keep in mind that when you turn 25, you will be considered independent, whether or not you live at home with your parents. The grant and work study monies will start rolling in.


You may not want to pursue a BA/BS, but you can get a AA/AS at your local community college in a worthwhile trade. Go talk to one of their counselors.
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Old 01-24-2019, 12:29 PM
 
56 posts, read 20,866 times
Reputation: 152
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
Yeah, I graduated with a 1.4 GPA. I really don't want anything in the medical field, I couldn't do that. The only good thing I can say is that unlike most I can do the same repetitive tasks over and over and never get bored, and follow simple instructions. Honestly, I wouldn't have any problem doing those assembly type jobs in places like China you see assuming it didn't come with the crazy human rights abuses; but just the job in and of itself would be no problem.
You write much, much better than a 1.4 GPA would suggest. Your lack of academic success was likely behavior not aptitude perhaps?

Nearly every job these days is certification or training driven. There is a test or process for damn near EVERYTHING. So, you will likely have to apply yourself to something. Based on your ability to communicate, I'd predict you'll do just fine.
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:02 PM
 
2,336 posts, read 565,018 times
Reputation: 2619
Quote:
Originally Posted by tamajane View Post
Nice. How did you start your path to that career?

It helps others to understand that this kind of thing can be done, everyone now pushes college or you can't ever make it and it will be poverty and struggle forever. Yet, you seem to be doing quite well.
Ask around and find out how to apply. A lot of times the hardest part about a high paying union job is to find out how to begin the application process. They're often not advertised in the same CompanyName.com/careers page as marketing, sales, HR jobs.

Most jobs have a position that is an entry point where you still make $$$ and get overtime, then in 3-5 years you get your journeyman card (whether an actual card or just an expression) and make full scale.
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:16 PM
 
1,916 posts, read 1,191,634 times
Reputation: 5005
If you are asking yourself "do I want to go to college?", then you are thinking about it backwards.

You should be asking yourself "what kind of life do I want?" Do you want to live in a big house? Small house? Apartment in the city? Farm in the country? Big family? Single life? What do you like to do for recreation, is it expensive or cheap? How much travel do you want to do in your life? Where do you want to live?

Once you know what kind of life you want, then find out what level of income you need to do it. Ask people who have the kind of life that you want what their income level is, or what income level they need. Don't ask people who don't have that kind of life, they don't really know, they are just guessing.

Once you know what income level you need, then find out what kind of jobs/careers will give you that income level. Look at salary data, there is plenty online. Make a list of them.

Then decide which jobs/careers on the list you like the best. Once you know this, look at job listings in the area where you want to live for the job/career that you picked. If you can't find job listings, then there aren't jobs in that area, and you'll need to pick something else on your list or pick somewhere else to live.

Once you've found your preferred job listings, then examine the listings for what the educational requirements are.

Then go do those.

Done.
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Old 01-24-2019, 01:38 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,572 posts, read 38,619,010 times
Reputation: 22119
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
For the record, I am 24 and like most, I have thought about college but there are a number of concerns:

1. I don't like school as it is and never did well in high school and barely graduated as it is.
2. I have heard so many stories of people spending tens of thousands of dollars on a degree to either never use it or barely get anything.
3. I don't like the thought of having to spend so much money on it when, even with a lower paying job I could be spending it on a lot more fun stuff instead. Imagine I did get a degree, but still got a job that may be better than minimum wage but it would be off set by having to spend a huge chunk of my paycheck for the next several years.
(sounds like you have yet to actually EXPERIENCE college, listening to 'hearsay')
1) @ age 24 Your college experience MAY (likely) be 100% opposite HS (mine was). Adults in college are there by choice and have an incentive to finish. HS is mandatory babysitting for many attendees. (and staff)

2) There are many degree choices that give you a lot of latitude. (Good idea to have diversity in experience and education. 25% of STEM grads leave their fields withing 5 yrs. (Only in USA can someone 'be-encouraged' to spend 20 yrs in EDU pursuing a field / career that doesn't exist, or they do not like... other countries are far more strategic in EDU and careers (+/-)) USA edu is all about 'feeding the pigs' (those who are in EDU to rip you off, while keeping their cozy careers safe and feeding them (well) for life)


3) You can go to college VERY inexpensively. Even a GREAT college (U of WY = $6,000 / yr as a resident) Go to WY and work energy job for a yr BEFORE you enroll ($80k wages for skilled workers / CDL (simple))
Many employers will pay / reimburse for college (Including Walmart)
Consider an international college. (that could be FUN + educational + you could end up with a VERY nice life / career path and international contacts for more friends, family, fun, business / career options)
https://www.student.com/articles/cou...y-free-europe/
https://www.valuecolleges.com/intern...ree-education/
https://www.degreequery.com/free-int...-universities/

btw... Skilled trades paid 100% for our family lifestyle... Single earner; farm + job, SAHM + homeschooling; International living and working and traveling; 30+ yrs as a caregiver to disabled parent; retire (leave employment) prior to age 50, able to start a family foundation in our 30's (lifetime gifting to others). Everyone survived.

Went on to get (5) degrees, (I like to learn).
Value of my (5) degrees = ZERO to lifetime income / wealth building.

But handy for 'other' things... options / experiences in life,

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 01-24-2019 at 01:46 PM..
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