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Old 01-27-2019, 12:15 PM
 
6,866 posts, read 10,010,129 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by InchingWest View Post
Find a job with a local Electrical, Plumber, HVAC company or even an Auto Mechanic. Go to the classes and every company in my area will pay for their employees to attend (it's not expensive, and even if you do go elsewhere the knowledge that employees gain is more than beneficial to the company training you). You'll get years of OJT instead of sitting in a classroom getting brainwashed by the Marxist doodleheads standing at the pulpit preaching instead of teaching.

Your wages working in a trade will do nothing but go upward, and rather quickly I might add. Sure you might start out at $12-15 an hour (beats working at Starbucks while you still drown in student loan debt!), but think of that as a trial period. You should be making at least $20/hr. in any of the trades by about your 3rd year and that's even in rural areas (much more for dense urban areas, and even more in unions).

Then, when you feel you have enough experience or whenever you can meet your state's minimum requirements to get a master tradesman's license you simply go out and start your own business and after that the sky is the limit.
Ironically, Starbucks employees can attend Arizona State University for free.

While we're on the topic of food service, it's not really the dead-end job people think it is. As long as you're not a terrible employee, you can move up to a management position. Over a decade ago, when I worked in fast food as a teenager, the regional/area managers were making about $45k. The store managers were making more than $30k. I'm sure salaries are higher now.
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Old 01-27-2019, 12:47 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,450 posts, read 67,275,281 times
Reputation: 72516
Quote:
Originally Posted by InchingWest View Post
Find a job with a local Electrical, Plumber, HVAC company or even an Auto Mechanic. Go to the classes and every company in my area will pay for their employees to attend (it's not expensive, and even if you do go elsewhere the knowledge that employees gain is more than beneficial to the company training you). You'll get years of OJT instead of sitting in a classroom getting brainwashed by the Marxist doodleheads standing at the pulpit preaching instead of teaching.

Your wages working in a trade will do nothing but go upward, and rather quickly I might add. Sure you might start out at $12-15 an hour (beats working at Starbucks while you still drown in student loan debt!), but think of that as a trial period. You should be making at least $20/hr. in any of the trades by about your 3rd year and that's even in rural areas (much more for dense urban areas, and even more in unions).

Then, when you feel you have enough experience or whenever you can meet your state's minimum requirements to get a master tradesman's license you simply go out and start your own business and after that the sky is the limit.
To get journeyman status in electrical (not sure about plumbing), which is where the best pay is, you need to take a long, multi-semester course of study, that involves a lot of math. These are offered through community colleges.
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Old 01-27-2019, 12:49 PM
 
744 posts, read 252,811 times
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Are you creative at all? Crafty? Do you like to sew? Can you take a sewing class?

There are tons of craft sellers on Etsy. You could make some good money selling custom pillows or window treatments.
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Old 01-27-2019, 01:01 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
685 posts, read 152,066 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carrienetro View Post
For the record, I am 24 and like most, I have thought about college but there are a number of concerns:

1. I don't like school as it is and never did well in high school and barely graduated as it is.
2. I have heard so many stories of people spending tens of thousands of dollars on a degree to either never use it or barely get anything.
3. I don't like the thought of having to spend so much money on it when, even with a lower paying jobI could be spending it on a lot more fun stuff instead. Imagine I did get a degree, but still got a job that may be better than minimum wage but it would be off set by having to spend a huge chunk of my paycheck for the next several years.
Thereís always some type of trade school - or community college which has some of the benefits (and less cost) of a traditional four-year university. I think if you can base your decision on what it is that interests you, it can make the task of school (or any type of training) less daunting and more enjoyable. So many people donít love what they do.
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Old 01-27-2019, 04:20 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
930 posts, read 455,482 times
Reputation: 2345
OP barely graduated from high school with a 1.4 GPA and doesn't want to go to college, and yet so many people are suggesting...college.
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Old 01-27-2019, 06:23 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
685 posts, read 152,066 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
OP barely graduated from high school with a 1.4 GPA and doesn't want to go to college, and yet so many people are suggesting...college.
Actually, OP said she was thinking about college but had concerns - one of which was owing a lot of debt at graduation. Also, since she is 24 - one can assume there has been some time since her high school graduation and many people make different choices at 25 or even 30 compared to their mindset at 18. I think people were just pointing out the many options available and give encouragement - and that a standard 4 year university is not for everyone. Btw, community colleges are full of people who had lower GPAs in high school who turned it around several years later.
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Old 01-27-2019, 07:02 PM
 
Location: Indianapolis, East Side
930 posts, read 455,482 times
Reputation: 2345
OP also said she was in special ed, could not work a cash register, and likes her current job stocking shelves because she doesn't have to think very hard. This is not a description of someone who is likely to succeed in college. The fact that she doesn't want to go into debt is beside the point. This is very different from someone who did poorly in high school due to drug use, family problems or just not caring about their grades.
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Old 01-27-2019, 07:41 PM
 
29,015 posts, read 46,162,303 times
Reputation: 15115
Quote:
Originally Posted by Coldjensens View Post
Go do what you love. You can always got back to school later, although it will be harder to do so when you have more responsibilities.

One of my sons, went to college for engineering. After three years, he realized sitting at a desk crunching numbers made him extremely unhappy. He realized he was only happy when he was rowing, training for rowing, working with rowers. He became a rowing coach. He will never be rich, he has to ride a bicycle everywhere because he cannot afford to maintain a car, but he is managing to make the payments on his student loans and pay his rent. He is extremely happy. He has not been happy like that in at least five or six years. Financially well off and miserable (potentially suicidal) as an engineer, or poor but happy as a coach. Guess which career path I would advise him to pursue? Money does not make you happy. being broke does not make you sad.

Money does make things easier in life, but easier is not the same as happier.

Studies of various cultures and their relative happiness have shown people are happy from their relationships with other people, not from their financial success and the ability to live independently and apart from other people.
Re your son----and this is just me--
It is possible your son through his knowledge of engineering could design/refine some aspect of the components that go into a rowing machine, a skull, even an oar lock or some other aspect of rowing???

And there are schools that look for rowing coaches who can teach some other subject-
Would it be worth it to him to get teaching credentials and try for rowing coach in private school?
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Old 01-27-2019, 07:48 PM
 
Location: San Francisco
685 posts, read 152,066 times
Reputation: 338
Quote:
Originally Posted by sheerbliss View Post
OP also said she was in special ed, could not work a cash register, and likes her current job stocking shelves because she doesn't have to think very hard. This is not a description of someone who is likely to succeed in college. The fact that she doesn't want to go into debt is beside the point. This is very different from someone who did poorly in high school due to drug use, family problems or just not caring about their grades.
If she said all that - then I apologize. I based my thoughts on the original post and title - and sometimes miss additional information that is added throughout the thread.
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Old 01-28-2019, 01:30 AM
 
Location: midwest
1,377 posts, read 989,050 times
Reputation: 833
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
You sound like you have no idea what your interests are, or where your talents and inclinations lie. You need to figure out what you're good at, and what type of work you enjoy, and then find a way to do that as a vocation.
It is certainly interesting that someone can spend 12 years in school and come out like that. It seemed to be the case with most of my classmates in high school. I was debating electrical vs mechanical engineering before my freshman year in high school. Reading science fiction provided a totally different perspective of reality than textbooks and sitting in class.

A Fall of Moondust

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Fall_of_Moondust

I read that before the Moon landing and now we are about to have the 50th anniversary. SF readers call that dated but it had a colony on the Moon and we have not been back for 47 years. But all of this computer stuff got promoted because of that. Integrated Circuits were too expensive in 1961 for anything but rockets, getting to the Moon and Minuteman missiles.
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