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Old 02-12-2019, 12:16 AM
 
Location: Andorra
76 posts, read 14,536 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JakeinChina View Post
My wife and I have the same issue with raising our daughter here in China. She currently attends a international school, but I don't see my job lasting too much longer. The international schools in China cost between 20 to 24k USD for annual tuition. My employer pays for this now, but say, in 2020, when I'm not employed, we need to find a place that has more schooling options for our daughter. I'm not a huge fan of homeschooling, as I just think daily interaction with kids her own age is very important. Also, my wife would never be able to handle my daughter in our home all day long...ha


555www- Keep me posted on your findings of schools for your child. There must be international schools that teach in English no?
There are indeed 2 international schools, but neither have me convinced. One is known for poor English teachers and the other is a brand new college with about 30 students across all year levels - kids of all ages are mixed together in classes there.

I'm not sure I believe in any specific type of schooling... I wouldn't want my kids 100% home schooled as we'd raise them in a bubble that is the expat community, and the local schools probably need to do more to open their eyes to the world.

My theory is to put them into the local schools which teach a lot in regards to European history, languages and traditional curriculum, then us parents can top them up on English lessons, business and financial responsibility, and our travels around the world can teach them through culture and experience.

I figure that is about as good as it it gets... right?
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Old 02-12-2019, 12:32 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,324 posts, read 67,105,367 times
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OP, I should clarify what I meant by "home-schooling your kids in English grammar, reading, writing". I meant an after-school program at home, if you don't find an expat-community program, something along the lines of the extra enhancement you mentioned in your 2nd post. It's not illegal anywhere, to tutor your kids in their mother tongue at home, after school.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:23 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
21,508 posts, read 38,543,578 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aaa555www View Post
There are indeed 2 international schools, but neither have me convinced. One is known for poor English teachers and the other is a brand new college with about 30 students across all year levels - kids of all ages are mixed together in classes there.

I'm not sure I believe in any specific type of schooling... I wouldn't want my kids 100% home schooled as we'd raise them in a bubble that is the expat community, and the local schools probably need to do more to open their eyes to the world.

My theory is to put them into the local schools which teach a lot in regards to European history, languages and traditional curriculum, then us parents can top them up on English lessons, business and financial responsibility, and our travels around the world can teach them through culture and experience.

I figure that is about as good as it it gets... right?
your kids are still very young, so you can make a plan.

While in 5 countries, we made it a definite point to NOT hang around with expats, (whiners / elite travelers... so they think) ) and instead focused on relationships, merging with locals. Tough, but much richer experience & better for us to mingle and learn as locals.

I would look into the local schools.

BTW; our kids spent very little time in the home while abroad (or in USA). Everyday they were out on 'adventure'. We only had a TV when the flat came with one (not at our homes). Plenty of other stuff to learn participate in, than to be 'passively entertained' (?).

Same when in USA...( As an entire family) we volunteered 2 days / week with seniors, and 2 days / week in Public schools + one day / week with our 300 student Homeschool group. (+ farmed and designed and built homes in our free time). I chose to set career aside while 'home' and worked a nightshift schedule so I could be with / teach kids / adventure all day / everyday.

We only lived in town when we were staying in Singapore. Otherwise, we were living / working communing in the countryside. And while traveling ... staying in Agritourimos (not hotels).

been doing this for 30 yrs... GREAT stays! kids learned a lot!
https://wikitravel.org/en/Hospitality_exchange

We are still following suit. Traveled all of 2016 as a couple (RTW in a yr), only stayed in (8) hotels the whole year, usually because we had catch an early flight. Hotel traveling is about as sterile / boring / unmemorable as it can get. (Why waste the cultural travel time and money on a silly 5*... the kids won't care) Just take them on a couple resort experiences / yr where they can swim 16 hrs / day! and buy milkshakes at the in-pool-bar. (They will remember that), but the relationships / learning from other kids, feeding, herding, and milking the cows / goats, riding horses on the ranches, going commercial fishing with hosts, fixing tractors and fences... That is the stuff they remember (people taking time to be with them and teach them.) Spain / Catalonia / France / Italy / Belgium... our kids LOVED it and spent a lot of time with locals (especially war vets, who would take our kids and show them around the communities and tell them very detailed stories of what it was like to be a kid in their own countries). I'm sure glad our kids were not stuck in a classroom (or an apartment!)

There are lots of options for your young kids. Don't follow the 'herd' / standard practice (Expectation). You have your kids for a VERY short time of their lives. then POOF, they are gone, and soon enough POOF, you are gone!

Last edited by StealthRabbit; 02-12-2019 at 02:38 AM..
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Old 02-12-2019, 03:53 AM
 
Location: Copenhagen, Denmark
10,227 posts, read 8,359,581 times
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All the kids I know who were put in the Danish education system did better than those placed in private, English-speaking schools. They did better, not only in terms of learning Danish (a tough language to speak and hear), but also in terms of forming friendships with Danish kids. In private English-speaking schools, at later ages especially, most of the kids have been punted around by their children from country to country and their friendships are transient and so are their personalities.

I understand why so many parents want to put their kids in English-speaking schools to prepare them for higher education in an English-speaking country. I made this mistake with a teen-age daughter. In the end, it worked out well when she returned to the US to complete her education, but while she was in school, here, her English-speaking friends were a motley crude, and whenever she returned to Denmark on vacation from the US, they were gone. This path was true for all the rest of the "foreign" families I know, who put their kids in English-speaking families.

But this is a really complicated matter due to the differing futures which very mobile families face and the passports that mother and father hold. Not every foreign family I know holds a passport from a visa-waiver country. For the foreign families I know who intended to remain in Denmark (and are citizens, as I write), three families kept their kids in Denmark and one did not, and Danish naturalization and immigration rules prohibited their kids from receiving permanent residence, so all the family gatherings have to take place overseas to Canada and the US, where their grown children now live.
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Old 02-12-2019, 07:08 AM
 
Location: Cebu, Philippines
3,262 posts, read 1,192,587 times
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To me, the most important thing is for the parents to speak English correctly, scrupulously, all the time, and hold the kids to that standard. And to require a lot of quality recreational reading.
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Old 02-12-2019, 09:19 AM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,618 posts, read 5,627,678 times
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If you speak English at home, your kids will speak English.

Take an easy example. If you go to a Immigrant neighborhood where there are children of immigrants that speak only Spanish (or Greek or Arabic or anything else), the kids speak both English and Spanish fluently because one is spoken in school and one is spoken at home. I've even seen parents trot out the six year old to translate.
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:37 PM
 
592 posts, read 532,448 times
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I think it really also depends on which country you are living in. Yes, the international schools based off of my experience with them in Asia, are not great. However, we live in China, and I'm trying to balance for my daughter an integration into the locals in China, but I want her to think, behave and act more Western (as well as Christian). If we lived in Europe or maybe even South America, it would be different, but the local kids in big cities where we live are spoiled and very materialistic.


My daughter never watches TV, unless its a Saturday night, she's allowed to watch 1 hour or maybe a movie if she would like to for that week. My wife spends 2 hours after school with her doing extra English, Chinese and math homework with her each night before dinner, and this is while attending an International school. If you don't do extra while attending an international school in Asia, your child will fall behind when compared to a good public school in the U.S.


Not meaning to knock home schooling, but I've experienced a number of families do it here in China from our Church. The children are not bad kids or uneducted, but they are not very sociable and have a difficult time speaking to other non-family members out in public. Its not just one family but many of them. Its like a small little Christian family bubble, which just IMO is not very healthy.


aaa555 - I think your approach is the best in your situation. Attend a public school for the overall education, and then maybe have your wife, who is Australian help with homework after school to improve English.
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Old 02-13-2019, 08:13 AM
 
966 posts, read 604,004 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aaa555www View Post
BLDSoon, can I ask: what language do you think in? Have you always thought in one single language or do you find yourself switching?



This is the assumption I also make. It's parents that are the problem, not the kids.

We have a house full of English books, English music, we speak English, their relatives speak to them in English, we travel often to English speaking countries, etc.
I would say i mainly think in English though i switch back and forth quite a bit. I dont ‘translate in my head’ from English at least not in the languages i’m fluent in. Sometimes i use all three in the same thought/ sentence especially when in a group thats speaking something other than English.

Mostly, its English though. Its ubiquitous in my life now and has been for a while so it dominates.
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Old Today, 11:39 AM
 
Location: Andorra
76 posts, read 14,536 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP, I should clarify what I meant by "home-schooling your kids in English grammar, reading, writing". I meant an after-school program at home, if you don't find an expat-community program, something along the lines of the extra enhancement you mentioned in your 2nd post. It's not illegal anywhere, to tutor your kids in their mother tongue at home, after school.
Makes sense. I like the "local school with a top up" model of education. Less TV, more learning.
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Old Today, 11:43 AM
 
Location: Andorra
76 posts, read 14,536 times
Reputation: 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by BLDSoon View Post
I would say i mainly think in English though i switch back and forth quite a bit. I dont ‘translate in my head’ from English at least not in the languages i’m fluent in. Sometimes i use all three in the same thought/ sentence especially when in a group thats speaking something other than English.

Mostly, its English though. Its ubiquitous in my life now and has been for a while so it dominates.
Thanks - I know it's an odd question but I've heard it mentioned a few times now where expats say to me "I want my child to think in English". I can't really see how it's an issue but I guess everyone needs something to stress about
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