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Old 02-12-2019, 06:05 AM
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Location: Ohio
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$16,000 is too high for bricks and mortar tuition. Maybe there's a middle ground? Could she get some of her education at the local community college and transfer credits to the $16K school?
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Old 02-12-2019, 09:28 AM
 
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I know I learn best being in a classroom or auditorium as my initial introduction to the topic. It doesn't have anything to do with asking questions - it is the format. That same lecture online isn't as effective for me. It isn't the medium - it is me.

By analogy, in the very early day of motion pictures, camera operators put a camera in the back and filmed a live stage production of of a play. They didn't move the cameras - they were stationary to capture the entire stage. They were attempting to film a live production. Someone who attends the play will have a very different experience from someone who watches the primitive movie of the play.
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Old 02-12-2019, 10:13 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
It seems to me that the biggest question is not being addressed...and I'm just bringing it up...I don't know the answer. But:

How will a potential employer view an online education versus the brick & mortar education?
Here's a better question. How will a potential employer be able to tell if you completed your degree online? Only a handful of regionally accredited colleges are 100% online.
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
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Scooby, if your wife is pretty self-directed, AND if she gets a good online instructor, then I would bet she would do just as well in an online class as in an in-person class.

I'm a college professor and I teach both regular classes (regular school year) and online classes (summer). I VASTLY prefer teaching my in-person classes, but I have to say, for intro-level classes that cover the same material, online classes are typically fine, and I like teaching them in the summer as I can do my prep, grading, etc. whenever (and of course that's one of the things my students like about the classes as well -- they have work due at the end of each week, but they can complete that work throughout the previous week as their schedule allows).

The ONLY online students of mine who have EVER had a problem are those who "forget" they're in the class!! Typically it's because the vast majority of their classes have been in person, then they take an online class in the summer and forget to "check in" every day (they don't necessarily have to do a piece of work every day, but they really should "check in" every day). I constantly email reminders, etc. to my online students, which helps them keep up; I imagine many online instructors do.

Since your wife hasn't been taking in-person classes, then there's no worry that she will "forget" that she's in an online class! And at most places that offer both online and in-person classes, the transcript doesn't say "online" so there's no stigma. My online classes show up on my students' transcripts exactly the same way my in-person classes do.

Good luck to her!
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Old 02-12-2019, 11:16 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,224 posts, read 9,547,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Here's a better question. How will a potential employer be able to tell if you completed your degree online? Only a handful of regionally accredited colleges are 100% online.
By one question in an interview?
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Old 02-12-2019, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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I can't think of a single discipline that could be competently learned with only online education. Even if four out of five classes are rote "learn this material" types, every category has classes that rely on classroom exchanges and in-person mutual learning to really develop the material.

Online-only is likely to produce those students who read everything, score A's and in the end don't really understand many of the key concepts of the program. Education is not pure mind-fill.
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Old 02-12-2019, 02:12 PM
 
6,852 posts, read 9,989,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
By one question in an interview?
I've had many interviews, and only one person asked if I completed one of my degrees online. She hired me. A lot of the employees at that job were getting tuition reimbursement for online programs.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I can't think of a single discipline that could be competently learned with only online education. Even if four out of five classes are rote "learn this material" types, every category has classes that rely on classroom exchanges and in-person mutual learning to really develop the material.

Online-only is likely to produce those students who read everything, score A's and in the end don't really understand many of the key concepts of the program. Education is not pure mind-fill.
Most classes consist of listening to a lecturer and having the same few students chime in. Might as well just watch a recording of the lecture. Most online students are working adults. Nothing simulates the real world better than the real world.

If you're truly intelligent, you can teach yourself a lot of things without college. In that case, going to college is just for the piece of paper. Online programs are not good for people who need hand-holding, have poor time management skills, and/or have poor study habits.
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Old 02-12-2019, 04:51 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,224 posts, read 9,547,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
I've had many interviews, and only one person asked if I completed one of my degrees online. She hired me. A lot of the employees at that job were getting tuition reimbursement for online programs.
First of all, I was simply answering question about how would one know if a degree was earned online or at the campus.

Secondly, in some fields it may not matter.

Would you go to a doctor that earned his degree online?
I would not even go to car mechanic who earned his degree online?
How do you do a chemistry lab totally online?
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:46 PM
 
6,852 posts, read 9,989,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
First of all, I was simply answering question about how would one know if a degree was earned online or at the campus.

Secondly, in some fields it may not matter.

Would you go to a doctor that earned his degree online?
I would not even go to car mechanic who earned his degree online?
How do you do a chemistry lab totally online?
Even if they wanted to ask that question, which they usually don't, an interviewee could easily lie. There's usually nothing on a transcript or diploma that indicates that a degree was earned online.

There are no accredited online degrees that qualify for licensure as an MD or DO, and most jobs don't require the hands-on skills that being a physician requires. There is, however, a distance education physician assistant program at Yale University. The didactic courses (courses that don't require labs) are done online. Everything else is done at Yale or at a local preceptor.

Most mechanics don't have a degree.

Labs for online chemistry courses are either done on campus (hybrid courses), at a laboratory/preceptor that is contracted with the school, virtually, or with a lab kit that you use at home. These courses have been around for a while, so some of your physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and nurses might have completed an online chemistry course as a prerequisite. Oooh, scary!
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Old 02-12-2019, 06:49 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,224 posts, read 9,547,388 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by L210 View Post
Even if they wanted to ask that question, which they usually don't, an interviewee could easily lie. There's usually nothing on a transcript or diploma that indicates that a degree was earned online.

...
And lying on a resume or interview is typically grounds for dismissal. I've personally seen it happen.
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