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Old 02-12-2019, 06:56 PM
 
6,852 posts, read 9,989,071 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
And lying on a resume or interview is typically grounds for dismissal. I've personally seen it happen.
I've never heard of anyone putting on his or her resume whether or not the degree was online or on campus. Yes, you can be terminated for lying in an interview, but that doesn't deter people. Companies have hired thousands of people with degrees from diploma mills even though they could easily go online and check the school's accreditation. HR professionals are not that bright.

So, back to my question. How will they be able to tell if a degree was earned online? They often can't, especially if the degree was earned from a school nearby. Asking an interviewee is not proper verification. You'd better hope that the hospital you go to didn't verify a physician's license simply by asking him or her during an interview. Walgreens had an unlicensed pharmacist working for them for years because they never verified, which can typically be done in a couple of minutes online. The employee said that she graduated from Creighton's PharmD program, but she didn't. The National Student Clearinghouse could have verified this. But, the mode of the delivery of a degree program cannot be verified.
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Old Yesterday, 10:03 AM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
7,095 posts, read 4,428,400 times
Reputation: 9104
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Content wise, information is information. If you are somebody that likes or needs to interact with other students, then you may not like it.

I'm disciplined and learn fine on my own.
This.

Online format works best for me. I absorb the information and engage with my cohort and find this medium suits my learning style. The institution, program structure, and instructor also play a role as well.
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Old Yesterday, 12:32 PM
Status: "Nope. I won't apologize." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
7,922 posts, read 2,962,796 times
Reputation: 16819
Some professors won't give references for students who take online courses, so this can actually be a big problem. It's harder to develop the interpersonal relationships with professors in online courses. and since lots of people need references for graduates programs, I think it would be only fair for the professor to state up front "I won't write references for anyone taking my online classes". The unfairness of this of course, is that as more and more classes are online, it can be harder to find any that are.
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Old Yesterday, 12:40 PM
 
Location: Southern New Hampshire
6,919 posts, read 12,140,125 times
Reputation: 20325
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Some professors won't give references for students who take online courses, so this can actually be a big problem. It's harder to develop the interpersonal relationships with professors in online courses. and since lots of people need references for graduates programs, I think it would be only fair for the professor to state up front "I won't write references for anyone taking my online classes". The unfairness of this of course, is that as more and more classes are online, it can be harder to find any that are.
Wow, I've never heard of this, and I certainly don't have that policy myself. What is the reasoning that the professors give? (If it's just "I'm too busy," well, in-person professors often say that as well. So what I'm really wondering is if it's something specific to online courses, but I can't imagine what that would be. Note, I'm not doubting you! You've just got me curious.)
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Old Yesterday, 01:24 PM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
6,194 posts, read 7,405,296 times
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I design and develop courses for online, and other types, of learning. I generally do this for corporations, but I've worked with five different colleges in the past. I'm also a graduate of an online, graduate level certification program. There is a tremendous amount of variance in classes at different colleges and even within a college. When I was doing readings for one of my personal courses, there are several factors that improve the learner experience. The number one factor is the ability to interact with the instructor. Second it the ability to interact with other students to some degree.

In the best online courses I took the professors required attendance during a weekly call that occurred at night. This course also required a group project. We connected via Adobe Connect. The ability to connect via Connect was included in the tuition. The right kind of Skype subscription or another web based meeting tool would also work today.

I've only been able to convince 2 professors to follow this model. The rest agreed to weekly office hours.

Most online courses have some sort of discussion forums to allow for student interaction. You get out of those what you put into them.

The number one ranked online MBA program requires students to spend a week on campus getting to know professors and classmates.

The point is, she needs to ask lots of very specific questions to have a great experience.
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Old Yesterday, 01:25 PM
 
Location: Bloomington IN
6,194 posts, read 7,405,296 times
Reputation: 15044
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Some professors won't give references for students who take online courses, so this can actually be a big problem. It's harder to develop the interpersonal relationships with professors in online courses. and since lots of people need references for graduates programs, I think it would be only fair for the professor to state up front "I won't write references for anyone taking my online classes". The unfairness of this of course, is that as more and more classes are online, it can be harder to find any that are.
I've yet to run into a professor with that policy. If they do have it, they probably aren't doing a great job as an online instructor.
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Old Yesterday, 01:26 PM
 
6,852 posts, read 9,989,071 times
Reputation: 5178
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Some professors won't give references for students who take online courses, so this can actually be a big problem. It's harder to develop the interpersonal relationships with professors in online courses. and since lots of people need references for graduates programs, I think it would be only fair for the professor to state up front "I won't write references for anyone taking my online classes". The unfairness of this of course, is that as more and more classes are online, it can be harder to find any that are.
I've never had this issue. I received references from professors who taught online courses at a community college. I was admitted to the master's program I applied to at a public university. I took online courses there, and the professors wrote letters of recommendation that helped me get into a PhD program that wasn't online.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rrah View Post
In the best online courses I took the professors required attendance during a weekly call that occurred at night. This course also required a group project. We connected via Adobe Connect. The ability to connect via Connect was included in the tuition. The right kind of Skype subscription or another web based meeting tool would also work today.

I've only been able to convince 2 professors to follow this model. The rest agreed to weekly office hours.
Many adult learners avoid programs like this because the synchronous classes conflict with their work schedules. A lot of people don't work 8-5.
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Old Yesterday, 04:01 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
7,095 posts, read 4,428,400 times
Reputation: 9104
Quote:
Originally Posted by karen_in_nh_2012 View Post
Wow, I've never heard of this, and I certainly don't have that policy myself. What is the reasoning that the professors give? (If it's just "I'm too busy," well, in-person professors often say that as well. So what I'm really wondering is if it's something specific to online courses, but I can't imagine what that would be. Note, I'm not doubting you! You've just got me curious.)
This. That's strange. I had no issues with receiving recommendations for grad school admissions process. I got into every program I applied to. My undergrad wasn't exclusively online, but it's the option I chose for my situation.
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Old Today, 07:50 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,221 posts, read 9,547,388 times
Reputation: 19266
Quote:
Originally Posted by PriscillaVanilla View Post
Some professors won't give references for students who take online courses, so this can actually be a big problem. It's harder to develop the interpersonal relationships with professors in online courses. and since lots of people need references for graduates programs, I think it would be only fair for the professor to state up front "I won't write references for anyone taking my online classes". The unfairness of this of course, is that as more and more classes are online, it can be harder to find any that are.
I agree with those professors who refuse.

Online is good for some things. But it is the course discussion component that is the key to many classes.
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