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Old 02-11-2019, 09:31 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,976 posts, read 7,916,289 times
Reputation: 28390

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This is not an anti-online rant. The internet has changed our lives, mostly for the better. This is a dilemma concerning a couple of things. My wife is looking to go into a completely new career field and she has two options: taking the classes online for $3,000 or taking an identical program at the same brick and mortar school for $16,000. She hesitates to take them online because although she is thoroughly versed in computers, she does not like the idea of online education. There is no contact with other students and it can be difficult talking to the instructor when she has questions. The online is much cheaper, but if she opts for the online and dislikes it, she loses her money, and $3,000 is a lot of money to lose. However, the $16K is a lot as well. (This a long term certification course program through a highly regarded community college).

Online education is convenient. It can be invaluable if a person lives in a rural area and transportation is a problem. But is it as good quality? I am thinking of starting an online Master's program but maybe I should opt for the brick and mortar myself. It's more of a hassle, but it is more gratifying? Is it worth is to pay more for online? To pay more for brick and mortar? I was considering this when seeing people taking online music lessons, online language courses, online personal training, online therapy. Sometimes online formats are not a replacement for face-to-face. When do you think they are adequate?
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Old 02-11-2019, 10:01 AM
 
10,270 posts, read 7,883,933 times
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Content wise, information is information. If you are somebody that likes or needs to interact with other students, then you may not like it.

I'm disciplined and learn fine on my own.
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Old 02-11-2019, 10:29 AM
Status: "No saccharine. No treacle." (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
27,631 posts, read 59,773,049 times
Reputation: 30737
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
But is it as good quality? ... Is it worth is to pay more ... for brick and mortar?
When do you think they are adequate?
Who do you suppose gets to answer these questions? The students? Nope.

Is the decision maker looking for trade school people...
or are they looking for something beyond that?
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Old 02-11-2019, 11:29 AM
 
6,233 posts, read 3,340,654 times
Reputation: 16531
A good online program from a quality college will match the content and instruction of their in class programs. The key is not the method of delivery but the quality of the program.

Of the online programs I've taken, the biggest issue was the delayed feedback on questions. In class you can ask and get an answer right then while its fresh. On line you have to either email and wait for a response or hold the question until the weekly live discussion (real time Skype like classes exist but many/most are video).

That feedback delay and lack of interactive learning were the biggest issues I felt.
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Old 02-11-2019, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,976 posts, read 7,916,289 times
Reputation: 28390
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
A good online program from a quality college will match the content and instruction of their in class programs. The key is not the method of delivery but the quality of the program.

Of the online programs I've taken, the biggest issue was the delayed feedback on questions. In class you can ask and get an answer right then while its fresh. On line you have to either email and wait for a response or hold the question until the weekly live discussion (real time Skype like classes exist but many/most are video).

That feedback delay and lack of interactive learning were the biggest issues I felt.
I think it also helps if the subject matter you are learning is something that is easy for you. If it is a difficult subject, online is not the best format. It is helpful to interact with others who can assist.
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Old 02-11-2019, 12:40 PM
 
6,852 posts, read 9,989,071 times
Reputation: 5178
Normally, only competency-based and independent study courses have no contact with other students. Those types of courses are in the minority. Most of the online courses I've taken have required discussion board posts. Even some of the competency-based programs have forums where you can ask other students and instructors questions.
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Old 02-11-2019, 06:38 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,221 posts, read 9,547,388 times
Reputation: 19266
It seems to me that the biggest question is not being addressed...and I'm just bringing it up...I don't know the answer. But:

How will a potential employer view an online education versus the brick & mortar education?
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Old 02-11-2019, 08:26 PM
 
2,315 posts, read 551,941 times
Reputation: 2590
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scooby Snacks View Post
This is not an anti-online rant. The internet has changed our lives, mostly for the better. This is a dilemma concerning a couple of things. My wife is looking to go into a completely new career field and she has two options: taking the classes online for $3,000 or taking an identical program at the same brick and mortar school for $16,000. She hesitates to take them online because although she is thoroughly versed in computers, she does not like the idea of online education. There is no contact with other students and it can be difficult talking to the instructor when she has questions. The online is much cheaper, but if she opts for the online and dislikes it, she loses her money, and $3,000 is a lot of money to lose. However, the $16K is a lot as well. (This a long term certification course program through a highly regarded community college).

Online education is convenient. It can be invaluable if a person lives in a rural area and transportation is a problem. But is it as good quality? I am thinking of starting an online Master's program but maybe I should opt for the brick and mortar myself. It's more of a hassle, but it is more gratifying? Is it worth is to pay more for online? To pay more for brick and mortar? I was considering this when seeing people taking online music lessons, online language courses, online personal training, online therapy. Sometimes online formats are not a replacement for face-to-face. When do you think they are adequate?
I would look in the mirror and ask myself: "Are overcoming my preconceptions worth $13,000 in my pocket?"
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Old 02-11-2019, 08:32 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
8,064 posts, read 2,564,681 times
Reputation: 11336
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
It seems to me that the biggest question is not being addressed...and I'm just bringing it up...I don't know the answer. But:

How will a potential employer view an online education versus the brick & mortar education?
When I was in college, getting an education was important, but was only secondary to having access to members of the opposite sex. There's not much of that, with online studies.
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Old 02-11-2019, 09:19 PM
 
2,343 posts, read 1,287,649 times
Reputation: 4841
There are pin heads all over life and there will certainly be HR people from a big state school that might nix a University of Phoenix candidate. There will also be atheists that might nix a Liberty app or a christian that only gives preference to the same. You simply can't account for that and its part of the normal happenings in HR. You'll be just as likely to get tossed for your interview performance or some other factor you might not be able to control due to the interviewer's preconceived notions.

I wouldn't stress about an online degree, so long as it is reputable.

As for social aspect, I'm old enough to not care about that. That is a personal thing.

The bigger issue is can you do the work on your own and stick with the plan without the structure of having to go to school? Online is more like independent study than anything else and requires a certain amount of discipline and the ability to learn without hand holding.
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