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Old 02-27-2019, 10:16 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,920 posts, read 9,782,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rugrats2001 View Post
In my area the greatest cause of school days off is cold. If it is predicted to be below 0 degrees Fahrenheit, the schools all preemptively close, because a large percentage of students walk to school every day and it is considered unsafe weather for them to walk in.
When our school system closed due to cold weather, it was because of the frequency of school heating systems not operating properly. After all, we build schools with "low bid" mentality.
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:21 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,920 posts, read 9,782,801 times
Reputation: 19598
Quote:
Originally Posted by KellyXY View Post
That's one of the arguments for block scheduling - it cuts the transit (and roll-taking) time in half.
Personally I think moving from one classroom to another is a good thing. Mental break of at least a few minutes and at least more physical activity than remaining seated in a chair for long periods of time.
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Old 02-27-2019, 10:25 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,462 posts, read 40,975,664 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
It seems the rationales should be educational, rather than stuff like the above. My kids' school had two days of block scheduling. The lab science teachers loved it, some other teachers not so much.
Don't think for a minute, no matter how much lip service is paid, that student impact is part of the equation in many systems.

When we went to a block schedule we found out why the backers refused to talk class size. Because it went up to an average of 38/class, some classes were over 40.

That was only one thing. I found that kids, high school, had difficulties keeping track of the class with a day off between. It was worse when you start throwing in scheduled days off or weather days off. Sometimes there would be a week between seeing a class.

When I retired in 2014 we were still on a 5 period/day block of 80 minute classes but the irony was that all English, Math, Government, Biology, AP and IB classes were held every day. Basically the tested classes.

A block schedule also allows the administrative team more time to work on their fantasy sports teams rather than waste it doing hall duty.
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Old 02-27-2019, 12:38 PM
Status: "Spring has Sprung!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,133 posts, read 101,098,782 times
Reputation: 32588
^^Still can't rep you, but your post made me smile.
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Old 02-27-2019, 01:30 PM
 
10,587 posts, read 8,064,275 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Katarina Witt View Post
OP, could you tell us what your concerns are? I just don't get this!
Threads in the Education forum amaze me. Americans go out of their way to avoid education. They don't want to take books home from school, they don't want homework, they want to reduce graduation requirements, etc.
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Old 02-27-2019, 01:42 PM
 
5,766 posts, read 6,473,576 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Threads in the Education forum amaze me. Americans go out of their way to avoid education. They don't want to take books home from school, they don't want homework, they want to reduce graduation requirements, etc.

Yup.


But in NYS they have regents exams. There is no getting away with slacking off if they have less than 180 days of classroom time. Yes, at times, teachers teach to the exam, but most of them provide a broad curriculum in their subject matter which includes what is needed to do well on the State Regents Exams which are given at the end of the school year (and NOT included in classroom days). People can kid themselves all they want about carrying books, classroom time, no homework, reduced graduation requirements, no replacement for snow days beyond three or four and every other imaginable excuse for not engaging in school, but in the end, the Regents exams are formidable and you have to go to school and do the work in order to do well. End of conversation.
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Old 02-27-2019, 02:42 PM
Status: "Spring has Sprung!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,133 posts, read 101,098,782 times
Reputation: 32588
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Threads in the Education forum amaze me. Americans go out of their way to avoid education. They don't want to take books home from school, they don't want homework, they want to reduce graduation requirements, etc.
I don't know why you're dumping on Americans, per se. We're always hearing about how there's no homework in Finland, little testing; fewer and shorter school days in many countries in Europe, etc, and that all is supposedly better.
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Old 02-27-2019, 03:38 PM
 
1,256 posts, read 557,807 times
Reputation: 923
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I think such deficiencies in days of instruction should be made up. That's over 10% of the school year.
Thats why I say it should be reformed. Educators should think about having a plan that focus on helping kids and teachers deal with the disruption in learning due to unexpected days off rather than focus on meeting raw days and or hours requirements, having kids watch movies/play games by taking away a well deserved break or holiday in another term does not help with making up lost education.

I am surprised that Kentucky would allow the school year to stretch over July 1st though, as thats usually the absolute cutoff for a previous school year.
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Old 02-27-2019, 05:02 PM
Status: "Spring has Sprung!" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,133 posts, read 101,098,782 times
Reputation: 32588
Quote:
Originally Posted by citizensadvocate View Post
Thats why I say it should be reformed. Educators should think about having a plan that focus on helping kids and teachers deal with the disruption in learning due to unexpected days off rather than focus on meeting raw days and or hours requirements, having kids watch movies/play games by taking away a well deserved break or holiday in another term does not help with making up lost education.

I am surprised that Kentucky would allow the school year to stretch over July 1st though, as thats usually the absolute cutoff for a previous school year.
I still don't get your passion for this issue. Here in the metro Denver area, surprisingly to many, we don't have that much weather that requires school cancellation. The districts have policies. Most years there are NO snow days. Some of the mountain districts may have this problem.

You are obviously not familiar with year round schools, either. School years can start whenever the district decides they start.
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Old 02-28-2019, 01:54 PM
 
1,256 posts, read 557,807 times
Reputation: 923
https://www.fool.com/knowledge-cente...scal-year.aspx In most states, the fiscal year for school districts is July 1st to June 30th. Thats why school time for that previous year in most areas cut off no later than June 30th. I guess maybe Kentucky is an exception. I do know that year round schools exist.

Though I would like to ask for those who live where this happens often, whether there are scheduled make up days or not, I know that nake up days are almost universally scheduled on the second semester. Though if there are many days lost on First Semester. Does it mean the first semester gets stretched for five extra days to allow teachers to finish their coursework and time for students to prepare for final exams and projects? It would be interesting if the First semester ends just before Winter/Xmas break does it mean Finals would occur right after students return to school?
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