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Old 03-05-2019, 01:05 PM
 
1,256 posts, read 557,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
I agree, and I think it's best handled (for that reason) by the states and localities.
Though what I ask is should other states in the nation follow California's example in waiving days caused by states of Emergencies or road closures?

Also what schools do about lost education time caused by such an unexpected interruption?
I know that during the Camp fire and the fires in Ventura County large amounts of metropolitan school districts including ones in Sacramento, Central Valley, and San Francisco Bay Area, were closed for long periods of time due to bad air quality even if not directly endangered by the fires. And it was near end of semester. They must had been cramming to get coursework done and prepare for finals.

Interestingly this issue happens for many years but there had not been much efforts to fix the broken system in many states. Stories of kids losing spring break, weekends, legal holidays, and summer vacation repeats, though those that do show up(to keep their perfect attendance records) are often finding themselves watching movies or playing games as there is nothing to be taught anyways, repeat almost every year there had been a harsh winter.
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Old 03-05-2019, 03:03 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,461 posts, read 40,975,664 times
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You've been told more than once that most states do indeed waive days for a declared State of Emergency. The procedures do vary by they're still in place.

Your premise that "rear wheel drive" school buses are disappearing because people own 4WD vehicles is, to be charitable, wrong headed. California is an outlier in the US by not requiring systems to provide bus transportation. Most states do require it.
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Old 03-05-2019, 08:58 PM
Status: "Spring has Sprung!" (set 21 hours ago)
 
Location: Foot of the Rockies
86,132 posts, read 101,098,782 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Your point, which is correct, is part of the reasoning for those select districts being exempted from making up all the missed days. Had they made them up they would have literally not been able to make up all the time prior to the first day the next school year began. With the exemption they did finish prior to July 1, the fiscal beginning of the next school year - but, again, that only happened with exempting 20 days. I have often wondered why school systems in areas that get hit with massive lost days on a regular basis donít switch to a calendar with an extended break in January-February instead of June-July.

Kentucky does a few year-round schools, but they take a small at the end of June and start a new semester the 1st week of July.
OK, my district's fiscal year is July 1- June 30.
https://www.bvsd.org/businessservice...get%20Book.pdf

However, the summer school classes run from June 10-July 15 with no school July 1-5, for some classes and June 3-July 26 for others. I don't know how they do this, but they do it.
https://www.bvsd.org/summerlearning/Pages/default.aspx

Just FYI, thought it was interesting.
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Old Today, 09:39 AM
 
1,256 posts, read 557,807 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
You've been told more than once that most states do indeed waive days for a declared State of Emergency. The procedures do vary by they're still in place.

Your premise that "rear wheel drive" school buses are disappearing because people own 4WD vehicles is, to be charitable, wrong headed. California is an outlier in the US by not requiring systems to provide bus transportation. Most states do require it.
I be curious are those states that require school busing more likely to cancel school these days compared to in the past. As they always used rear wheel drive buses, I be curious why not give all wheel drive and spiked snow tires a try, I bet coupled with chains they should be unstoppeable in all except the worst white out conditions. I heard in some areas school buses do double as snowplows with a plow attachment.

While they do wave school attendance requirements from time to time for itís not a given, unlike in California where itís pretty much universally a given, and school makeup days just donít exist for 98% if districts there. Doesnít necessary has to be a declared state of emergency as long as the superintendent is in good faith.
They do risk losing funding for that day should the waiver not come down in time, but makeup days never came to reality.
Interesting there has not been much effort to reform this flawed system in much of country which m focus more on numbers of days as a contract for receiving state funding than a quality education.
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Old Today, 10:08 AM
 
6,421 posts, read 3,437,145 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by citizensadvocate View Post
I be curious are those states that require school busing more likely to cancel school these days compared to in the past. As they always used rear wheel drive buses, I be curious why not give all wheel drive and spiked snow tires a try, I bet coupled with chains they should be unstoppeable in all except the worst white out conditions. I heard in some areas school buses do double as snowplows with a plow attachment.

While they do wave school attendance requirements from time to time for itís not a given, unlike in California where itís pretty much universally a given, and school makeup days just donít exist for 98% if districts there. Doesnít necessary has to be a declared state of emergency as long as the superintendent is in good faith.
They do risk losing funding for that day should the waiver not come down in time, but makeup days never came to reality.
Interesting there has not been much effort to reform this flawed system in much of country which m focus more on numbers of days as a contract for receiving state funding than a quality education.
Can't say for the state, but were I live I'm in the confluence of 3 school districts. Our district doesnt have buses; the other two do. In fact buses from those districts drive down our street to reach parts of theirs. Those districts close at the slightest sign of snow. Ours almost never closes. Has nothing to do with front vs rear wheel drive. Instead liability. Bus with kids wrecks, district will get sued and heads will roll. Parent driving kids to school wrecks, sorry not the school's fault. It's not about student safety but about who can be blamed.
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