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Old 03-08-2019, 11:11 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,804 posts, read 9,720,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Thank you. That sounds like micro-management. It can get expensive for some parents, too.
Yes it can. In my middle school I stepped in and if a teacher required his own notebook, he or she had to prove why that was necessary. For example, I allowed a science teacher to do that because he wanted to have students pass in their whole notebooks once each quarter for an overall evaluation. On the other hand, a math teacher had no good reason for having her own notebook.

Parents are not all ATMs.
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Old 03-08-2019, 12:11 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,791 posts, read 67,623,683 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
R4T. Sadly you are using the same logic I would have used. Unfortunately teachers really did require individual binders, notebook, folders, etc. And to disagree slightly with NBP, whom I respect, it was teacher specific. For example one year all the teachers wanted 1 1/2 inch binders except Mrs C's English which had to be a 3 1/2 D ring binder. Yes it got very expensive buying all this special stuff each year. There's a separate thread from a couple years ago on that.
The bolded is ridiculous! A 3-1/2" binder, for one class?! I bet the kids never used more than 1/3 that space, if that.

This sounds like teachers getting too self-important. They each want the student to have a dedicated binder just for their course.
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Old 03-08-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,804 posts, read 9,720,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
The bolded is ridiculous! A 3-1/2" binder, for one class?! I bet the kids never used more than 1/3 that space, if that.

This sounds like teachers getting too self-important. They each want the student to have a dedicated binder just for their course.
Perfect diagnosis.

But there are some pretty weird teachers. We had one in our school who, after a paper of anytime was graded, the child carried it home to be signed, and then returned it to the teacher who then kept it in a file for five years (I guess she figured after graduating from high school -- she taught 8th grade -- that she was no longer at risk of...something).
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Old 03-09-2019, 09:22 AM
 
Location: The analog world
16,858 posts, read 9,451,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I'm thinking about this in the context of some real-life examples, to see if it bears out. Quite possibly, for some semesters or academic years, it could. But if a student is taking a language class, say, no voluminous binder or sectioned spiral notebook is needed; a simple folder will do, or a dedicated section in a big binder. The foreign language textbooks usually aren't too big. For "English" class (literature), all there is at any given time is a paperback to carry around. Handed-in and graded papers can also be kept in a separate section of the main binder, or in a folder kept in the locker 3-4 days/week.

Where the big, heavy books come in is for "social studies" courses, like history, and now many universities require "World economics" on the HS transcript, also the sciences, and computer courses. Maybe some math courses have big books. But the schools usually have computers; students aren't required to lug computers to school and back daily, except for small hand-held calculators. (Many public school students can't afford computers; I see them at the local library every day, monopolizing the entire computer section, doing their homework.)
And students don't have science courses every semester, or even every year. Some of that stuff is spread out over 4 years, so that for any given semester, a student might only have 2 big textbooks possibly with their own accompanying workbooks or something. There might be an intense semester or three, where the student has 3 big books.

Please enlighten me, if you have a different experience to share, on your kids' behalf. I notice one thing that's definitely changed since many of us here were in school, is that universities are requiring much more of HS students, as entry requirements. More higher math in HS, "World economics" and other college-level-sounding subjects like Psychology, Sociology or Anthropology, more science. All of that would add to the book load, obviously.
In my high schooler’s backpack right now...

A composition book for English, used for a reading journal
An assigned paperback for English
A vocabulary and grammar workbook
Three single subject spiral bound notebooks, one each for Chem, Precalc, & AP Gov
Music binder for choir
Binder containing lab book
Binder containing pre-calc workbook
Graphing calculator
Empty water bottle
Extra graph and lined paper
Pens, pencils, etc.

That doesn’t include lunch if he chooses to pack or the equipment he needs for swim practice. Fortunately, he can leave his textbooks at home most of the time and borrow library copies during his off periods if necessary. Still, it’s a lot of stuff to carry around all day.

Total weight: 19.2 lb.

So why doesn’t he use his locker? Likely because the school is comprised of three large, separate buildings, and he simply does not have time to visit his locker during passing period.

Last edited by randomparent; 03-09-2019 at 10:20 AM..
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Old 03-09-2019, 10:15 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,396 posts, read 40,861,289 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
Perfect diagnosis.

But there are some pretty weird teachers. We had one in our school who, after a paper of anytime was graded, the child carried it home to be signed, and then returned it to the teacher who then kept it in a file for five years (I guess she figured after graduating from high school -- she taught 8th grade -- that she was no longer at risk of...something).
I don't know, English teachers seem to be the main ones who do that. We had one who, when we'd have a parent conference, would bring every piece of work the kid had done that year. She'd then go over every error in every assignment. Talk about a bloodbath with teachers trying to get to the conference before her. This was an 11th grade English class so American Lit maybe.
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Old 03-09-2019, 11:20 AM
 
6,366 posts, read 3,408,426 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
The bolded is ridiculous! A 3-1/2" binder, for one class?! I bet the kids never used more than 1/3 that space, if that.

This sounds like teachers getting too self-important. They each want the student to have a dedicated binder just for their course.
No argument here. Our school district is very good at turning out college bound students. But painful along the way.
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Old Today, 05:21 AM
 
2 posts, read 368 times
Reputation: 10
Can anyone answer that why their privilege should be taken away?
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Old Today, 10:37 AM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,804 posts, read 9,720,831 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esdschool View Post
Can anyone answer that why their privilege should be taken away?
Are you talking about the privilege of carrying a backpack.

In our school it was about:

1. The possible concealing of weapons.
2. No place to secure 25 backpacks in each classroom during class.
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Old Today, 11:41 AM
 
Location: 912 feet above sea level
2,057 posts, read 753,095 times
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There are more books today, and they tend to be heavier individually. My children attended the same school I did (recent graduates) almost three decades after I did.

So all you saying "Listen, you young whippersnappers, when I was a kid we toted 75 lbs. of books both ways uphill in the snow for miles!" need to understand that the universe does not revolve around your youth and that, yes, the world changes over time.
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Old Today, 02:17 PM
 
Location: The analog world
16,858 posts, read 9,451,368 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
There are more books today, and they tend to be heavier individually. My children attended the same school I did (recent graduates) almost three decades after I did.

So all you saying "Listen, you young whippersnappers, when I was a kid we toted 75 lbs. of books both ways uphill in the snow for miles!" need to understand that the universe does not revolve around your youth and that, yes, the world changes over time.
My kids carried few textbooks back and forth to school each day in middle school & high school. None in elementary. My current high school student carries mostly workbooks (pre-calc, chem, etc.). The only traditional textbook any of them carried daily was for Latin class, and it was fairly small. I don’t recall carrying a lot of textbooks when I was in school either. Some of you all wrapped up in proving each other wrong here, but there’s clearly a lot of variation.

Returning to backpacks, they were common when I attended high school in the early eighties, and they’re common today at our local high school. There were/are no prohibitions against carrying them.
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