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Old 03-05-2019, 08:03 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,226 posts, read 3,148,428 times
Reputation: 12769

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The dad in the article was 26. It could easily be a decade since he's had a proper math class. Even if he got it the first time, it'd wouldn't be odd to need a refresher course after that much time. After all, I'm constantly hearing well-educated parents complaining that they can't help their kids with math homework because they've forgotten it and/or the teaching methods have changed.

Anyway, I wouldn't assume that the math on the board necessarily represents the class overall. Could be reviewing a few basic problems in preparation for something more complex.

 
Old 03-05-2019, 09:13 PM
Status: "I don't have to agree." (set 5 days ago)
 
Location: Texas
8,162 posts, read 3,065,884 times
Reputation: 17166
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
The dad in the article was 26. It could easily be a decade since he's had a proper math class. Even if he got it the first time, it'd wouldn't be odd to need a refresher course after that much time. After all, I'm constantly hearing well-educated parents complaining that they can't help their kids with math homework because they've forgotten it and/or the teaching methods have changed.
.
Good point. I returned to college in my 40s and saw many students my age or older. Many of them taking remedial courses because they'd forgotten a lot. It's very common nowadays for colleges to have older students. It's not like everyone is fresh out of high school.
 
Old 03-05-2019, 10:01 PM
 
698 posts, read 419,583 times
Reputation: 2302
Learning is learning. It's all good.
 
Old 03-05-2019, 10:29 PM
 
Location: Colorado Springs
20,745 posts, read 9,692,393 times
Reputation: 19484
Quote:
Originally Posted by EDS_ View Post
So the thought of students in college taking what is quite likely a Junior High level math class does not bother you?

________________

The rub is when students are that far behind they very rarely close the gap.
1. I just red the whole article. Where does it say that this is junior high level algebra?

2. Did you know that Harvard offers algebra?

3. Did you know that algebra is the most failed mathematics course?

4. But let's say it is a basic algebra course. If that's what the student needs to be successful, then that's what the university ought to be offering. And this is nothing new. At my college, back in the 1970s, all freshmen had to take English composition, but throughout the semester students could test out of the course. However, many students needed a whole semester of it.

5. Was this algebra course Secondary school/introductory ‘College’ algebra, Linear algebra, or Abstract algebra (a college prerequisite for a degree in mathematics)?
 
Old 03-05-2019, 10:30 PM
 
789 posts, read 151,526 times
Reputation: 1299
Quote:
Originally Posted by Hulsker 1856 View Post
Note the 'institutional credit only'. The course doesn't count toward graduation.
[/quote]

I interpreted "institutional credit only" differently than you. I interpreted it that it cannot count among the required 42 hours of mathematics courses for a BS major in mathematics or the 18 hours for a mathematics minor - but that it does indeed count towards the institutionally required number of credit hours for Morehouse College.

Where did you find that it doesn't count towards graduation?
 
Old 03-05-2019, 11:30 PM
 
2,265 posts, read 3,849,511 times
Reputation: 2010
Quote:
Originally Posted by RationalExpectations View Post

I interpreted "institutional credit only" differently than you. I interpreted it that it cannot count among the required 42 hours of mathematics courses for a BS major in mathematics or the 18 hours for a mathematics minor - but that it does indeed count towards the institutionally required number of credit hours for Morehouse College.

Where did you find that it doesn't count towards graduation?
Page 62 of the document linked in the post you replied to.

Requirements for graduation:

2. Successfully complete a minimum of 120 semester hours of non-repeat courses (exclusive of courses numbered below 100.)
 
Old 03-05-2019, 11:54 PM
 
7,775 posts, read 8,594,938 times
Reputation: 6015
Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
1. I just red the whole article. Where does it say that this is junior high level algebra?

2. Did you know that Harvard offers algebra?

3. Did you know that algebra is the most failed mathematics course?

4. But let's say it is a basic algebra course. If that's what the student needs to be successful, then that's what the university ought to be offering. And this is nothing new. At my college, back in the 1970s, all freshmen had to take English composition, but throughout the semester students could test out of the course. However, many students needed a whole semester of it.

5. Was this algebra course Secondary school/introductory ‘College’ algebra, Linear algebra, or Abstract algebra (a college prerequisite for a degree in mathematics)?
1. I was partially joking but look at the whiteboard. Keep in mind we are deep into the semester.

2. I've never once heard of a college that does not offer algebra.

3. Algebra is the most often failed college math class because it's tough content for people short on math skills and many degree paths require it. Another factor is lots of kids take it as their first college level math class and they just aren't ready.

4. I agree with you.

5. I doubt that is anything but a remedial class of some kind.
 
Old 03-05-2019, 11:55 PM
 
Location: Eugene, Oregon
8,184 posts, read 2,618,910 times
Reputation: 11649
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoCal25 View Post
Learning is learning. It's all good.

That's what it's all about. If some new students need booster courses, to bring them up to where they can function in the standard, entry-level college math, then isn't that better than to just let them struggle and fail, without them? That's what often happened in the good old days, to which the OP is referring. That's not "dumbing-down", but rather, a big improvement in the way a college curriculum is organized.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 12:03 AM
 
Location: You call this living?
3,488 posts, read 1,437,799 times
Reputation: 9032
As an arts major, I didn't take math in college at all.
I did take algebra, geometry, and algebra trig in high school. I use geometry and algebra all the time, but don't even remember the point of trig.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 12:14 AM
 
5,025 posts, read 4,930,222 times
Reputation: 5887
You know, I've seen introduction to [insert any science course here] that most non-science majors are required to take and they are usually at high school level or below. That is how it has been for a long time. Yet many people don't cry out about how we're "dumbing down" college.

We are only seeing a snippet of this class---how do we know what kind of material they cover in its entirety? How do we know he's not just going through some basics as a refresher before moving onto more complicated things? If the student's older, like another poster said, maybe he hasn't taken math in awhile and does need a remedial course. So what? I might need one too if I went back now.

Who determines how much math one needs and how complicated it should be beyond the basics?
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