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Old 03-06-2019, 02:55 PM
 
207 posts, read 22,123 times
Reputation: 154

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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.9c7ac8bcfd13

Warning - Washington Post has a paywall. You get the first few articles free.

In this feel good story, a man who is a senior at Morehouse college (a historically black college in Atlanta, GA) had to bring his baby to class with him. The professor offered to hold the baby while he taught, so that the student could take notes. What a sweet and supportive prof!

But the real issue here is that the material being taught is high school algebra, even first year of algebra. This is material that, in my district, the most advanced students take in 7th grade, the moderately advanced students take in 8th grade, and the majority of students take in 9th grade. This is essentially remedial math, that should not be offered for college credit, but just as remedial preparation for students who enter college unprepared for college level math, that is taken for no credit. And this is a senior taking what is essentially remedial math? I don't care if you call it "College" algebra. It's still remedial math, whether you call it "High School" or "College".
Yes
How terrible that an education institution is providing the education at the level that their students need

Thank you for bringing this atrocity to everyone's attention

 
Old 03-06-2019, 04:17 PM
 
Location: Bronx
15,597 posts, read 18,098,607 times
Reputation: 7862
From what I remember. I started to take algebra at the tails end of the 8th grade. In which algebra at the tails end of 8th grade will give me a preview of what is to come for the 9th grade. I remember here in NYC, the high school I went to. I made it up to math 6 by my senior year. Most of my friends did not make it up to that level in math, and the city of NY would graduate students who did not have adequate math skills, or give them math credits for non algebra courses. When I reached college, I remember folks taking remedial courses do to the fact those that be never completed high math courses, or did not graduate with a high math scores before leaving high school or scoring low on entrance exams.

This story that I read reminded me of a similar story that happened when I was in college. I was taking a course in correctional institutional. In that particular class I was taking, a female student brought her baby daughter to class for the midterm exam. The professor with her Caribbean accent showed no compassion for this single mother who could not find child care, and failed her for the exam. The professor did not give her a make up exam, and stated that this is the real world, and the real world is hard.

Last edited by Bronxguyanese; 03-06-2019 at 04:33 PM..
 
Old 03-06-2019, 05:03 PM
 
931 posts, read 481,089 times
Reputation: 2048
Quote:
Originally Posted by sas318 View Post
Slightly off topic, but college is supposed to be higher education, but so many immigrants whose English sucks can graduate. How the heck do they understand what professors are saying or what they're reading in their textbooks since the vocabulary in college is more advanced, i.e. SAT words? Even if they learned English in their home country, how much do they remember the SAT type words if they never have a chance to use it in their home country? Especially since no one speaks that way.

That's my gripe about American colleges, that immigrants whose English level is no where near a native's can still graduate college. That's college being dumbed down college to me.
Because immigrants are actually willing to put in the work.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 05:19 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,226 posts, read 3,148,428 times
Reputation: 12769
Quote:
Originally Posted by sas318 View Post
Slightly off topic, but college is supposed to be higher education, but so many immigrants whose English sucks can graduate.
Their English literacy is probably fine. Many schools are much more effective at developing students' second language reading/writing than their verbal skills. I did part of my schooling overseas and I did fine academically (with some extra tutoring and studying) even though I sounded like a complete goober when I spoke the local language aloud.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 05:37 PM
 
Location: Fort Lauderdale, Florida
8,605 posts, read 7,872,428 times
Reputation: 18420
I took the most dumbed down math possible in college from a major university! My math professor literally walked us through the math class so we could pass.

I failed Algebra TWICE in high school. There was no way I could have passed a college level algebra.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 06:09 PM
 
209 posts, read 21,805 times
Reputation: 183
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
Washington Post has a paywall. You get the first few articles free.
it comes down if you smirk at it enough.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiritualBaseball View Post
How terrible that an education institution is providing the education at the level that their students need
you might have missed the point. college students might need basic reading skills, but they should probably have that sorted out before they go to college.

even if they dont, im all for giving them chances to brush up or learn new skills, but maybe its not a reassuring thing to find on a college campus. if its a tutor and a student in the library, thats another matter. doesnt say a lot about what high schools are doing either, if colleges need to pick this up.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 06:17 PM
 
15,632 posts, read 17,387,135 times
Reputation: 15368
Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifes...=.9c7ac8bcfd13

Warning - Washington Post has a paywall. You get the first few articles free.

In this feel good story, a man who is a senior at Morehouse college (a historically black college in Atlanta, GA) had to bring his baby to class with him. The professor offered to hold the baby while he taught, so that the student could take notes. What a sweet and supportive prof!

But the real issue here is that the material being taught is high school algebra, even first year of algebra. This is material that, in my district, the most advanced students take in 7th grade, the moderately advanced students take in 8th grade, and the majority of students take in 9th grade. This is essentially remedial math, that should not be offered for college credit, but just as remedial preparation for students who enter college unprepared for college level math, that is taken for no credit. And this is a senior taking what is essentially remedial math? I don't care if you call it "College" algebra. It's still remedial math, whether you call it "High School" or "College".

I went to college in the 1960s and colleges offered remedial math and english even back then. Kids who did not get it in high school still went to college and had to take these courses if they needed them. It says NOTHING about the content of the regular courses that the students take for their degrees.
 
Old 03-06-2019, 06:29 PM
 
207 posts, read 22,123 times
Reputation: 154
Quote:
Originally Posted by dynamicjson View Post
you might have missed the point. college students might need basic reading skills, but they should probably have that sorted out before they go to college.
Where should they do that?
Quote:
even if they dont, im all for giving them chances to brush up or learn new skills, but maybe its not a reassuring thing to find on a college campus. if its a tutor and a student in the library, thats another matter. doesnt say a lot about what high schools are doing either, if colleges need to pick this up.
Right.
Colleges need to pick this up
And they are
So, what's the problem?

I'd imagine that the classes at the university are more efficient than the tutor and the library.
More structured, more students (so easier to find enough teachers, less costly - paying one teacher instead of one per student)

Quote:
Originally Posted by nana053 View Post
It says NOTHING about the content of the regular courses that the students take for their degrees.
Exactly this
 
Old 03-06-2019, 06:38 PM
 
6,344 posts, read 3,396,330 times
Reputation: 16792
Quote:
Originally Posted by SpiritualBaseball View Post
Yes
How terrible that an education institution is providing the education at the level that their students need

Thank you for bringing this atrocity to everyone's attention
I'm glad for the young man going to college. And more so for a professor willing to help a student.

I think a bigger question is why is the college having to pick up what should have been done in high school?
 
Old 03-06-2019, 06:47 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,358 posts, read 40,810,140 times
Reputation: 42543
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I'm glad for the young man going to college. And more so for a professor willing to help a student.

I think a bigger question is why is the college having to pick up what should have been done in high school?
You and I are about the same age, I think, and, as someone else mentioned, remedial Math and English classes have been offered since before we went to college.

I think I should have probably taken remediation but didn't, nor was it mentioned, although I remember numerous kids doing so. This was 1973.
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