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Old 03-11-2019, 11:54 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,527 posts, read 710,350 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
I would say the other way around - too much activity, not enough straight teaching of the basics.
Ah, but see there's where the problem goes into


It's all pure memorization nonsense instead of talking out with the students


Granted, I don't know what the teaching standards were back then, but the teachers just give whatever assignment out that requires the students to use paper or use the computer and that's it.
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Old Yesterday, 04:06 AM
 
12,807 posts, read 6,696,887 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by parentologist View Post
I would say the other way around - too much activity, not enough straight teaching of the basics.
You mean like being able to write coherent paragraphs?

In the rest of the world, school is “hard”. Generally, it’s not in the United States. It’s the root cause behind the income and wealth stratification problem. The top 10% of parents make sure their children are properly educated. The rest rely on a public school system that doesn’t teach fundamental skills.
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Old Yesterday, 04:22 AM
 
329 posts, read 37,808 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GeoffD View Post
The top 10% of parents make sure their children are properly educated. The rest rely on a public school system that doesn’t teach fundamental skills.
isnt that just the pareto principle?
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Old Yesterday, 04:25 AM
 
329 posts, read 37,808 times
Reputation: 300
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
I am definitely not a troll. Luciano struggles to communicate his ideas in a coherent manner. I now understand that he has an unspecified learning disability, which does help explain some things, but I remain genuinely concerned about his chronic sleep deprivation, which is not healthy for anyone of any age, most especially a teenager. I am the parent of three children, two young adults and one high school student. I know the difference between typical teenage sophistry and disordered communication.
fair enough. i have no trouble understanding him, and i thought you were giving him a hard time. if thats not so and he isnt offended, i doubt theres any need for me to be offended for him.
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Old Yesterday, 05:14 AM
 
Location: The analog world
16,851 posts, read 9,444,342 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luciano700 View Post
Ah, but see there's where the problem goes into


It's all pure memorization nonsense instead of talking out with the students


Granted, I don't know what the teaching standards were back then, but the teachers just give whatever assignment out that requires the students to use paper or use the computer and that's it.
Describe for us when this is happening in your education. Is it one class/teacher or all of them? Do other students feel the same way? How is your knowledge measured? Are you assigned papers or projects to demonstrate your mastery of subject matter? If yes, how often?

And btw, this was a much better post. You stayed on topic and raised points that can further explored. Well done.
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Old Yesterday, 08:19 AM
 
6,364 posts, read 3,405,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dynamicjson View Post
i wouldnt call the adoption of even more of what doesnt work "more academic" though.

the mechanisation of school as something increasingly based on test scores has certainly not helped the drive.

the relative failure of schools to stay relevant, the fact that people have 24/7 access to a larger library in their own home than they once had at the city library-- but schools do relatively nothing with this-- the increasing amount of leftist dogma, as well as many other things. education is great, school sucks. i liked reading before and after school-- i love it. school taught me to hate it for a while. i finally love the subject of history. too bad school teaches nearly everyone to hate that-- along with a visceral, traumatic fear of learning itself that you find in practically everybody. you know what people still like learning after school? trivia. as long as its something unimportant, school cant kill the love of it.

school isnt just job training, theyre tasked with teaching you how to think.

how do you think? shut tf up and stand in line, pretend to agree, dont make a fuss. the worst thing you can say about school is how many important people did poorly in it, or quit altogether-- einstein, bill gates, im not saying everybody that does well is stupid. school insists on staying broken, and silicon valley isnt going to fix it (but they will try to purchase it.)
I think this is more to the point of what should be discussed, but has become overlooked. You've hit on a key point, which is school teaches to hate the idea of learning, rather than teaching how to learn. Your point that "school insists on staying broken" is spot on. Any fixes to education are going to have to come from outside, and the education industry is going to resist change with everything it has. Look within this forum itself, how may topics are practically non discussable.
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Old Yesterday, 08:42 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,527 posts, read 710,350 times
Reputation: 695
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Describe for us when this is happening in your education. Is it one class/teacher or all of them? Do other students feel the same way? How is your knowledge measured? Are you assigned papers or projects to demonstrate your mastery of subject matter? If yes, how often?

And btw, this was a much better post. You stayed on topic and raised points that can further explored. Well done.
I say only 3 teachers try to engage with us for real


The rest of the students are "your on your own" type, journalism is a bit in the middle.

And everything, yes and very often than most of us could imagine.
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Old Yesterday, 08:55 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,389 posts, read 40,850,935 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Luciano700 View Post
I say only 3 teachers try to engage with us for real


The rest of the students are "your on your own" type, journalism is a bit in the middle.

And everything, yes and very often than most of us could imagine.
The "on your own" is the current "best practice" looked for in teacher observations and evaluations. Students are expected to take "ownership" and become "vested" in their education with teachers backing away from instruction to become "facilitators" of students' education.

Some iterations of this model postulate that a teacher with subject area expertise is actually a hindrance to a student "actualizing his educational efforts and achievements".

I ran into this with one Principal who told me that I had too much subject area knowledge which hindered my evaluation. Mind you this was after almost thirty years and being considered a Master Teacher who was tasked with easing new teachers into their job.

The educobabble I included is in quotation marks.
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Old Yesterday, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,527 posts, read 710,350 times
Reputation: 695
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The "on your own" is the current "best practice" looked for in teacher observations and evaluations. Students are expected to take "ownership" and become "vested" in their education with teachers backing away from instruction to become "facilitators" of students' education.

Some iterations of this model postulate that a teacher with subject area expertise is actually a hindrance to a student "actualizing his educational efforts and achievements".

I ran into this with one Principal who told me that I had too much subject area knowledge which hindered my evaluation. Mind you this was after almost thirty years and being considered a Master Teacher who was tasked with easing new teachers into their job.

The educobabble I included is in quotation marks.
Btw forgive me for putting "students" there, I meant to say "teachers"
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Old Yesterday, 09:07 AM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,527 posts, read 710,350 times
Reputation: 695
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
The "on your own" is the current "best practice" looked for in teacher observations and evaluations. Students are expected to take "ownership" and become "vested" in their education with teachers backing away from instruction to become "facilitators" of students' education.

Some iterations of this model postulate that a teacher with subject area expertise is actually a hindrance to a student "actualizing his educational efforts and achievements".

I ran into this with one Principal who told me that I had too much subject area knowledge which hindered my evaluation. Mind you this was after almost thirty years and being considered a Master Teacher who was tasked with easing new teachers into their job.

The educobabble I included is in quotation marks.
Problem is nowadays we hardly learn incredibly necessary stuff. Is funny how when a student engages in philosophically-trivial stuff the student gets looked like an psudointellectual, even though a bunch of crap is so uneccesary.

Also now more kids probably know just how to do some random math equation than something more important such as inflating your car's tires or how to do the laundry


Thankfully math modeling is actually teaching us some necessary stuff
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