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Old 03-12-2019, 06:53 PM
 
Location: Round Rock, TX
2,529 posts, read 712,162 times
Reputation: 695

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Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
What makes you think this is true anywhere but in your social bubble? There are a lot of high schoolers in the world. I had/have three of them. They could all cook a meal and do their own laundry by middle school. They all mastered checking the oil and changing a tire when they learned to drive. They had part-time jobs and managed their own money.

Luciano, I understand that you’re disappointed with some aspects of your life right now, but you can either spend your days whining about how other people are failing you, or you can decide to buckle down. Your Algebra teacher is a bore? So what? Do you need that credit to graduate? Get to work. Set yourself free from the tyranny of bad teachers and stop using them as an excuse for your own lack of motivation. You are in charge of your own learning!
Well my situation is a bit complex right now

But what's ironic is that I seen people say quite the opposite about today's youth- That they're over-coddled, over protected, over sheltered and are hardly given self discipline.

Also here's a study I would recommend looking


https://www.usnews.com/news/articles...naep-data-show


Here's some more so that I don't get accused of just "cherrypicking one article to prove my point"


https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/...udy/105758486/

https://www-m.cnn.com/2017/09/22/hea....google.com%2F


And there's this one
https://www.npr.org/sections/ed/2016...ns-report-card


Oh and speaking from personal experience, my classmates can't even bother to put the phone down for one second and usually I am the only one in each and evety few of my classrooms to be the "lone wolf" here. We are always told we are one classroom behind lol


We that being said I do what I do that I can to increase the motivation there.
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Old 03-12-2019, 09:25 PM
 
6,371 posts, read 3,408,426 times
Reputation: 16824
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
What makes you think this is true anywhere but in your social bubble? There are a lot of high schoolers in the world. I had/have three of them. They could all cook a meal and do their own laundry by middle school. They all mastered checking the oil and changing a tire when they learned to drive. They had part-time jobs and managed their own money.
..
It's actually more unusual that kids know how to cook, change oil, do minor repairs today than it is than it is to find ones that do. Assuming that parents teach these skills to kids is a bad assumption today. Working with kids in Scouting, I'm constantly amazed at what the kids, and their parents DON'T know. And really has little to do with education level. Just basic life skills. Some kids have never picked up a tool or seen one used. There are a lot of kids who think food only comes from eat out or a microwave. They seldom get a home cooked meal. And I'm not talking about lower SES but kids with professional parents.

Daughter was an RA in college, and son is in college. Both report the same lack of basic skills among their peers.

Schools used to have shop which taught basic repair skills. And Home Ec which taught cooking, cleaning, mending, etc. And basic home budgeting and finance skills. Today however those classes have been taken out of many schools. To many schools are focused getting kids into college rather than preparing them for life. Priority should be life first, college second.
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Old 03-13-2019, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Northern Appalachia
4,928 posts, read 6,101,675 times
Reputation: 5715
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Schools used to have shop which taught basic repair skills. And Home Ec which taught cooking, cleaning, mending, etc. And basic home budgeting and finance skills. Today however those classes have been taken out of many schools. To many schools are focused getting kids into college rather than preparing them for life. Priority should be life first, college second.
I have to disagree. I graduated from high school in 1973. I had shop in junior high (7-9), which was required. We did not learn any basic repair skills. I made a jewelry box, a book holder, and probably something else in 3 years. Kids today in my local school district have wood shop in 7th grade and a technology course in 8th grade where they do a lot of different activities such as robotics, screen printing, electronics, and 3D printing. Anyone can also sign up for various types of shop class in high school.

I did not have any lessons on home budgeting and finance skills in school and none were offered. Today's students have several opportunities to cover this information between a component in civics class, a required class called "On Your Own, and an elective called personal finance.
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Old 03-13-2019, 10:05 AM
 
19,117 posts, read 15,799,329 times
Reputation: 36047
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
It's actually more unusual that kids know how to cook, change oil, do minor repairs today than it is than it is to find ones that do. Assuming that parents teach these skills to kids is a bad assumption today. Working with kids in Scouting, I'm constantly amazed at what the kids, and their parents DON'T know. And really has little to do with education level. Just basic life skills. Some kids have never picked up a tool or seen one used. There are a lot of kids who think food only comes from eat out or a microwave. They seldom get a home cooked meal. And I'm not talking about lower SES but kids with professional parents.

Daughter was an RA in college, and son is in college. Both report the same lack of basic skills among their peers.

Schools used to have shop which taught basic repair skills. And Home Ec which taught cooking, cleaning, mending, etc. And basic home budgeting and finance skills. Today however those classes have been taken out of many schools. To many schools are focused getting kids into college rather than preparing them for life. Priority should be life first, college second.

Those classes didn't prepare me for anything, lol. In the 70's, girls were not allowed to take auto repair or anything, we had cooking and sewing. The only thing I remember making in "cooking" class were Rice Krispie treats, simple things that are cheap ingredients for dozens of kids. We were not taught a thing about budgets or finance. In sewing class, we had an entire semester to make a wrap-around skirt (I never finished mine). Not exactly survival skills, lol.


Schools IMO moved in the direction parents demanded. If you go to the individual state forums, there are a million threads that start with "We are moving from Minnesota for a job in NYC. Which towns in NJ have the best school districts with advanced placement classes and blah blah". They don't ask about shop classes. I think it's become so crazily competitive now, most students and parents would rather take an extra advanced placement class than a skills type class were another slot to open in the day.


I happen to be a big fan of vo-tech schools, and wish we had many more of them. My nephew who knew he was not college material, wanted to take a Chef track at our county vo-tech, and there were so many applicants for so few slots (for every track) they had to use a lottery system. So he did that last resort of the non-college bound and joined the service. Not that he shouldn't be proud of it, but it should not be the only option other than college.
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:03 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,396 posts, read 40,872,793 times
Reputation: 42588
Quote:
Originally Posted by villageidiot1 View Post
I have to disagree. I graduated from high school in 1973. I had shop in junior high (7-9), which was required. We did not learn any basic repair skills. I made a jewelry box, a book holder, and probably something else in 3 years. Kids today in my local school district have wood shop in 7th grade and a technology course in 8th grade where they do a lot of different activities such as robotics, screen printing, electronics, and 3D printing. Anyone can also sign up for various types of shop class in high school.

I did not have any lessons on home budgeting and finance skills in school and none were offered. Today's students have several opportunities to cover this information between a component in civics class, a required class called "On Your Own, and an elective called personal finance.
You and I grew up in the same area, I'm a year older, and you're correct. We also were tracked.

Woodshop (make a four gun wall rack and various towel holders, bird houses, etc.) was 7th with plastics (make a letter opener and a bunch of change purses) and electrical was 8th. General Ed took a second year of wood or electrical or their first year of metal. Girls took two years of Home Ec, one cooking and one fabrics.

Academic, College Prep and Business went into academic classes with College Prep taking Alg I and Bio with everyone else taking another year of General Science and pre-Alg.

At that time, in that school systems, classes, with the exception of Foreign Language, taken in 9th did not count for graduation.


So there's some serious myths out there about what was taught to overall classes in past years.
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:15 PM
 
19,117 posts, read 15,799,329 times
Reputation: 36047
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
You and I grew up in the same area, I'm a year older, and you're correct. We also were tracked.

Woodshop (make a four gun wall rack and various towel holders, bird houses, etc.) was 7th with plastics (make a letter opener and a bunch of change purses) and electrical was 8th. General Ed took a second year of wood or electrical or their first year of metal. Girls took two years of Home Ec, one cooking and one fabrics.

Academic, College Prep and Business went into academic classes with College Prep taking Alg I and Bio with everyone else taking another year of General Science and pre-Alg.

At that time, in that school systems, classes, with the exception of Foreign Language, taken in 9th did not count for graduation.


So there's some serious myths out there about what was taught to overall classes in past years.
Donít forget Graphic Arts, where we made a camera out of a shoebox and learned to develop film. Thatís been helpful in life, lol.
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Old 03-13-2019, 01:48 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
75,803 posts, read 67,623,683 times
Reputation: 72860
Quote:
Originally Posted by Luciano700 View Post
First off, I recommend looking up "sleep procastination"


2nd, there is no point in getting a good night's rest anymore, all the technology and the hard to fight sedentary lifestyles(which I gotta put effort into myself to fight of course) kill the need for one


If you were to have mention the 2 things lol maybe I wouldn't have wanted to give such a rebuttal


BUT, you can't just get a good night's rest though by just sleeping in. You actually need the proper requirements lmao

This is what bothers me, everyone recommends getting a good amount of sleep OBVIOUSLY, but where are the tips to improve sleep quality or to help encourage students sleep earlier? See it's easy to just say that and recommend it right away without looking at the other problems

For me personally I hate to say it but I haven't found sleeping an enjoyable thing to do over the last 3 to 10 years which is quite a gap to be honest


The Western world is desperate to plan out a killing of the human species, that's why you have so many unnatural ideologies and over rising technology.
If you have sleep problems, post in the Health forum. And what's stopping you from going to be earlier? And what do lightbulbs have to do with it? You sound like you should see your school's health clinic to discuss this important issue.
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Old 03-13-2019, 02:04 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,396 posts, read 40,872,793 times
Reputation: 42588
Quote:
Originally Posted by ocnjgirl View Post
Donít forget Graphic Arts, where we made a camera out of a shoebox and learned to develop film. Thatís been helpful in life, lol.
We didn't do that but Photography Club was an extracurricular where you did develop film. In retrospect it was kind of an elegant system. The Club took all the photos (games, dances, clubs, etc.) and developed them for the yearbook (itself an extracurricular) with the exception of the individual class pictures you bought.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:25 PM
 
Location: Former LI'er Now Rehoboth Beach, DE
7,458 posts, read 10,066,100 times
Reputation: 7318
The influx of many foreign students into school districts has forced the American students to become more competitive at a younger age. Many of the Asian students in my former district have driven the curriculum in a new direction. Parents of the students demand rigorous courses because the students are all about studying. We are laughed at in some overseas communities, for our watered down course content and emphasis on extra-curricula activities like sports. All one has to do is look at the Regeneron Talent search or as it was previous known, either Intel or Westinghouse talent search and then look at the winners of the scholarships. In more cases than not, the students themselves are either immigrants or they are the first American born in the family.
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Old 03-13-2019, 05:43 PM
 
Location: The analog world
16,872 posts, read 9,451,368 times
Reputation: 22503
My daughter’s best friend left school a couple of weeks each throughout elementary and middle school to attend math cram school in Taiwan. In high school, he decided he’d had enough and refused to go any longer. No doubt he benefited from the experience, but it was incredibly stressful for him. He and my daughter ended up finishing Calculus at the same time, got into similarly challenging college majors, and are both doing well in their chosen fields. I have often wondered what the point was when all was said and done. It’s essential to put in the work, but a little balance helps to prevent early burn out.

Last edited by randomparent; 03-13-2019 at 05:54 PM..
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