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Old 03-28-2019, 07:54 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,669 posts, read 41,323,631 times
Reputation: 42928

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Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
In 1940, 4% of the population had a bachelor's degree.
25 years ago, when I went, ~18%, IIRC.

Now it's over a third.
That sudden jump didn't happen without a major lapse in standards.
Your 18% number is low, it was around 25%.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/...her-by-gender/

If you notice there's been a steady upward trend every year for 70 years.


The Census has a multi-page PDF with the disaggregated data.
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Old 03-28-2019, 10:54 AM
 
Location: Texas
43,220 posts, read 51,845,499 times
Reputation: 69827
Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
Your 18% number is low, it was around 25%.

https://www.statista.com/statistics/...her-by-gender/

If you notice there's been a steady upward trend every year for 70 years.


The Census has a multi-page PDF with the disaggregated data.
When I went to college, it was not even 20% of women.
Men might have broken into the 20s.
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Old 03-28-2019, 11:28 AM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
6,032 posts, read 1,695,529 times
Reputation: 8523
Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Do you think that's true though, or is he being too black and white about that? Or if he's absolutely right, why is college a lot more easy to pass nowadays?
There are website services where you can pay someone over the internet to do your homework, so yes, college is much easier to pass than before. And there’s also website services that allow students who already took the class, to upload completed coursework for future students to see.

Furthermore, you have countless math calculators that can solve anything you throw at it AND it shows you the work on how it got the answer, countless YouTube tutorial videos showing you a step by step process, and countless independent contractor tutors online who will answer your question.

We didn’t have any of that growing up. All you need is a damn internet connection to get a college degree.
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Old 03-28-2019, 11:55 AM
 
4,354 posts, read 1,380,267 times
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Oh okay, I didn't know what. I just did my own homework and studied (shrug). So when you get a final report card and it says your score, compared to the 'class average', are they lying, or is the class average really the class average?
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Old 03-28-2019, 12:28 PM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,669 posts, read 41,323,631 times
Reputation: 42928
Quote:
Originally Posted by stan4 View Post
When I went to college, it was not even 20% of women.
Men might have broken into the 20s.


Then you went longer than 25 years ago.
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Old 03-28-2019, 01:04 PM
 
3,631 posts, read 1,522,110 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Oh okay, I didn't know what. I just did my own homework and studied (shrug). So when you get a final report card and it says your score, compared to the 'class average', are they lying, or is the class average really the class average?
It should be the class average. The issue is that at many schools, the class average is going up.

Think about it, if you have to take out student loans, you should be looking at graduation rates. If you have to take out $10K a year for one school and have a 4-year scholarship, but graduation rates are only 40% (after which you donít know how much you will pay a 4 years is some time down the road), but you have to take out $15K a year for another school that has a 92% graduation rate, it is not always so easy as taking that lower priced school. That $10K a year school might end up being much more expensive if you donít graduate in 4 years and have to pay full price for that 5th year.

Many schools, especially at the higher end (in terms of expense) really advertise their graduation rates and placement into graduate schools. They do that partially by having grade inflation as compared to other schools and making it very hard to flunk out or have to retake a class.
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Old 03-28-2019, 04:24 PM
 
Location: Washington State
17,623 posts, read 9,113,911 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ironpony View Post
Well I thought that whether or not someone fails, is that the teacher has a lot of power in that, cause when I was in school, some teachers were easy and some were quite hard. One was really difficult and I wouldn't be surprised if he had the highest rate of failed students, but still remained a teacher if he was doing his job up to some kind of code and all.

So isn't it heavily dependent on the teachers, styles and methods, shall we say?
When I was at a large state university in engineering, my professor said I'm only passing 20% of you and that's what he did and it was a class you needed to pass in order to continue in the curriculum...I'm sure they would never do that today. yes, many failed in the past and now everybody passes and usually with A's versus average about C+ back in the day.
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Old 03-28-2019, 04:45 PM
 
4,354 posts, read 1,380,267 times
Reputation: 1322
Oh okay. When I was in high school back in the early 2000s, I had a history teacher who was tough as nails on history, and a lot of the students did very poor in his class. I don't know how bad they did but they would often talk about how they couldn't pass or just bairly pass in his class, as he was just too tough for them.

Since history was my best subject, I did very well, so I couldn't say it was tough for me. But I wonder if it would be different today then, even in high school, for that teacher?
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Old 03-28-2019, 04:48 PM
 
5,333 posts, read 6,544,119 times
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I went to college a long time ago (early 90s), and frankly I didn't think college was all that hard then. I don't think it's gotten easier. I don't know where he gets that kids today don't fail. They do.
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Old 03-28-2019, 05:02 PM
 
6,538 posts, read 3,521,136 times
Reputation: 17222
Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
It should be the class average. The issue is that at many schools, the class average is going up.

Think about it, if you have to take out student loans, you should be looking at graduation rates. If you have to take out $10K a year for one school and have a 4-year scholarship, but graduation rates are only 40% (after which you donít know how much you will pay a 4 years is some time down the road), but you have to take out $15K a year for another school that has a 92% graduation rate, it is not always so easy as taking that lower priced school. That $10K a year school might end up being much more expensive if you donít graduate in 4 years and have to pay full price for that 5th year.

Many schools, especially at the higher end (in terms of expense) really advertise their graduation rates and placement into graduate schools. They do that partially by having grade inflation as compared to other schools and making it very hard to flunk out or have to retake a class.
You have to look more deeply than this. In reality it appears the schools with higher graduate rates are actually academically harder than those with lower graduation rates. Because they admit a higher capacity student body to start with. There is a fairly strong correlation between grades of admitted students and graduation rate (kind of a duh! if you think about it). Schools that admit a higher proportion of lower skilled students will have lower graduation rates.
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