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Old Yesterday, 11:02 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,566 posts, read 41,120,469 times
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The entire premise of this thread is wrong since "everybody and their mom" does not go to college in any event.

Roughly 68% of 2016 graduates went on to college. That includes 4 year and 2 year institutions. When I was teaching my graduates split about evenly between 4 year and the local community college.

One thing that is lost in this is that community colleges were not originally designed to cater to students going on to a 4 year school but as trade schools and for adult continuing education. At some point the mission changed.

This is a chart for college attendance from 1960 to 1998. It went from just under 50% in 1960 (kids born ca. 1941) to around 65% in 1998 (kids born ca. 1980), not much different than 2018.
https://nces.ed.gov/programs/digest/d99/d99t187.asp
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Old Yesterday, 11:11 AM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,071 posts, read 60,594,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by North Beach Person View Post
One thing that is lost in this is that community colleges
were not originally designed to cater to students going on to a 4 year school
Is that why they were called "Junior Colleges"?
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Old Yesterday, 11:25 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,566 posts, read 41,120,469 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrRational View Post
Is that why they were called "Junior Colleges"?
I imagine that depended on local usage. I grew up in Pennsylvania and community/junior colleges were almost nonexistent. There was one about 70 miles from me that became a student deferment hub. That's the only one I can think of. Pitt and Penn State each had several two year campuses around the state. Many of those have transitioned to four year schools.

The only other two year " colleges" I can think of were those that that were private and had Business College in their name.

This one was close to me.

DuBois Business College to close its doors after 131 years | Local News | theprogressnews.com
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Old Yesterday, 12:12 PM
 
Location: Shawnee-on-Delaware, PA
3,815 posts, read 3,461,677 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tarkinson View Post
As it is, everybody and their mom can go to college, as a result, student debt is insane and lots of people are just dumb and shouldn't be in college at all. What if there were far stricter requirements, say only the smartest most intelligent people were allowed to go to college? Kind of like how it was back in the day?


Yes, it would be better. But colleges (that is, the administrators) are getting rich from federally guaranteed student loans, local construction companies are constantly building new buildings, and politicians are able to brag about how many people go to college compared to "back in the day".


So no, it will never get harder to get into college. It will only get easier. Then you better go to Grad School to prove you're not a complete dummy like those 4-year losers.


College is the new High School.
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Old Yesterday, 12:16 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,893 posts, read 2,079,739 times
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Colleges should return to being educational institutions, for the level of student who qualifies in a broad intellectual and goal sense, with specialized schools (med, law) teaching the pinnacle of students who qualified for those specialties. Period.

Job tickets, whether for HVAC or IT, should be issued by a lower tier of schools, accessible to a much wider range of students, without dressing up what is basically trade training in educational trappings. This can be fulfilled by the existing tier of community and junior colleges through a large number of "universities" restructured to the task.

Athletic budgets should be limited to 5% of the overall school budget and oriented toward students who want to play, not budding pros who need a farm system, and not as a marketing arm to sweep in as many high-profit students as possible.
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Old Yesterday, 02:13 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,071 posts, read 60,594,592 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Job tickets, whether for HVAC or IT, should be issued by a lower tier of schools, accessible to a much wider
range of students, without dressing up what is basically trade training in educational trappings.This can be fulfilled
by the existing tier of community and junior colleges through a large number of "universities" restructured to the task.
That and the need for remedial math and language coursework
that the wrench turners didn't quite get when still in High School.
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Old Yesterday, 02:16 PM
 
Location: Raleigh
7,849 posts, read 5,808,063 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Colleges should return to being educational institutions, for the level of student who qualifies in a broad intellectual and goal sense, with specialized schools (med, law) teaching the pinnacle of students who qualified for those specialties. Period.

Job tickets, whether for HVAC or IT, should be issued by a lower tier of schools, accessible to a much wider range of students, without dressing up what is basically trade training in educational trappings. This can be fulfilled by the existing tier of community and junior colleges through a large number of "universities" restructured to the task.
They are. If you want HVAC or Coding classes, you can almost invariably attend the local Technical/Community college. Here its referred to as "Wake Tech" (Wake County Technical College.) Where I grew up it was referred to as "College of Doe County." In the Southwest/TX I think they tend to be referred to as "X Junior College." You could do a for-profit college but that isn't because the non-profit doesn't offer those things.
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Old Yesterday, 02:21 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
5,893 posts, read 2,079,739 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JONOV View Post
They are. If you want HVAC or Coding classes, you can almost invariably attend the local Technical/Community college.
Which, for white collar employment, is almost worthless against a field of candidates who have a 4-year degree from the University of Southern North Dakota.

No one needs a university education for a job ticket, no matter how highly the field thinks of itself. And a vanishingly small number of students in computer/software/programming/IT programs give a rat's XOR about the "education" their dear old alma mater is trying to squeeze in between the coding classes.

It's really about a huge dose of reality, from high school grads to Fortune 100 hiring departments.
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Old Yesterday, 04:42 PM
 
1,245 posts, read 908,615 times
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yes, but it would cause university teachers' unemployment and more free money on many people's hands.
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Old Yesterday, 06:58 PM
 
Location: Wasilla, AK
6,778 posts, read 3,773,280 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
Which universities would those be?

Please do not go around believing that white and Asian people are the great oppressed at America's colleges and universities. The numbers just don't play out. They are still the majority groups at most colleges and universities.

Go ahead and list the statistics of student populations at the top schools.

Here's one resource on enrollment: https://nces.ed.gov/programs/coe/pdf/coe_cpb.pdf

Before you go around pushing your false racist agenda, please at least have the facts to back up what you're saying.

I've been to many different colleges and universities and the majority of the students I've encountered have been white. Colleges in the midwest and in the northeast.

So, unless there is some true geographical population imbalance, most colleges and universities are not leaving out white and Asian people.

By the way, I'm not ignoring the undercurrent of your comments that imply that white and Asian people are the "better" people and they're being held back in promotion of the inferior Black and Latino people.
When you go straight to the race card you've already lost the argument. My post is based on numerous articles I've read on the matter. This is just one. Google "race based university admissions" and you can find plenty more. And no, I'm not a racist and never have been. I'm a first generation American born to immigrant parents.


https://www.forbes.com/sites/richard.../#593c98d1f098
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