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Old 04-08-2019, 10:21 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pullin2 View Post
In junior high, one of my teachers decided I was to receive weekly paddling, since the likelihood of having earned it was high, and he didn't want to keep track of individual misbehaviors. So, every Friday after lunch, I was brought to the front, paddled and sent back to my seat. This was the only time my parents got involved. They advocated to the principal that it was unfair, and he agreed there should be a specific reason -- so the scheduled paddling stopped.

Glad that your parents were willing to advocate for you. In kindergarten, every time that we'd line up, the teacher would announce to the class "Richard is bad, so he has to go to the front of the line. [My name] is slow, so he has to go to the back of the line". That would happen every time we lined up, regardless of whether or not Richard actually misbehaved. Nobody else would ever have to go to the front of the line even if they misbehaved.


As for myself, I would get in trouble if anybody was slower than me and behind me in line. If I was so slow, shouldn't she have wanted me to speed up so that I wasn't last in line? So why would I get in trouble if anybody was slower than me? Interestingly, she would frequently announce to the class, completely out of any context "Stephanie is the slowest person in the class". But I was the one who got in trouble the one time Stephanie was behind me in line. No, my parents never did anything to help me with this teacher.
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Old 04-08-2019, 10:27 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by pullin2 View Post
In junior high, one of my teachers decided I was to receive weekly paddling, since the likelihood of having earned it was high, and he didn't want to keep track of individual misbehaviors. So, every Friday after lunch, I was brought to the front, paddled and sent back to my seat. This was the only time my parents got involved. They advocated to the principal that it was unfair, and he agreed there should be a specific reason -- so the scheduled paddling stopped.

Another incident this reminds me of: we had 2 librarians in middle school. I once found a book whose author had the same name as one of my friends. One time, I was unable to find that book, and I asked one of the librarians where that book was. She kicked me out, saying that looking for books with authors that have the same name as my friends is not proper use of the library. Shortly after, that librarian ended up in the hospital with breast cancer (she passed away shortly after). The other librarian saw me, and for no reason at all, kicked me out of the library, and said "I don't know what you did wrong. But I know that [other librarian] kicked you out previously. Since she is in the hospital, I can't ask her what you did wrong. But I know that you have to be really obnoxious to get kicked out of the library, so if she kicked you out, you had to deserve it, so I am going to kick you out too". That was even though I did absolutely nothing wrong that day.
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Old 04-08-2019, 10:38 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CraigCreek View Post
Elementary school: Stand in the corner (and if all the corners were full, stand along the back wall of the classroom), stay after school (to complete deskwork or homework assignments left undone), get sent to the principal's office, or sit on the bench in the entry hall after school - everyone would know why, this was comparable to being put into the stocks! If you sat there to wait for your mother to show up to take you to the dentist, you'd certainly tell everyone passing by that was why you were there.

In elementary school, the 3 levels of punishment were getting kicked out of class and having to stand in the hallway, getting kicked out and sent to the "black chairs" (will explain below), and getting sent to the principal's office.


The "black chairs" were chairs in the lobby of the building that were used for detention. Like you said, it was comparable to being put in the stocks! Strangely, only one of the chairs was colored black, so I don't know why they were called the black chairs. The first time I was sent there, I thought that I was only allowed to sit in the chair that was colored black. Another student was sitting in that chair. I told him that I had to sit in the black one, so he moved to a different chair.

Quote:
A sixth grade substitute teacher, an older woman, once scandalized my class by taping shut the mouth of a talkative boy. She ripped the tape off just before we got out of school, and it appeared it ripped off the top layer of skin as well...I don't think she ever subbed for our class again after that. Not sure our regular teacher, a youngish woman we all liked and respected and who was an outstanding teacher, even learned about it.

There was a case like that in the news back when I was in high school.


Quote:
High school: get sent to the assistant principal's office, get graded down, get banned from honor societies and senior recognition day for skipping one day of school, regardless of academic and other achievements -a classmate still bears a grudge for this, as he otherwise would have qualified for scholarships that might have allowed him to attend more than one year of self-paid college - and avoided Viet Nam.

I very strongly disagree with grades being lowered for disciplinary reasons, but it seems that most people support that practice, unfortunately.

Quote:
This, while an award winning golden boy type got caught cheating on a final exam his senior year, and it was hushed up so he could continue to win awards. His mother was my seventh grade English teacher in the same school system, which may have been a factor. I assume she was notified about her son's cheating.

It's very frustrating seeing punishments being inconsistently applied, especially in a case like this where the stakes were so high. He ended up in Vietnam, it's not simply a case of him getting a day of lunch detention or being kept inside for recess. I'm sure that the people on this forum will argue clichés like "Don't do the crime if you can't do the time", but that ignores the issue of punishments being inconsistently applied.

Quote:
The Viet Nam vet came home, finished college on the GI Bill, went to grad school in computer science and did very well financially in Silicon Valley, but still bears a grudge for the overkill of his punishment for cutting school one day. The cheater became a pediatrician.

It's frustrating how the people who always broke the rules and never were punished end up being successful in life.


Quote:
My high school had high academic standards, and lots of teachers on the verge of retirement, some still excellent but others who just taught by the book, with little creativity. The three younger teachers I was blessed to have were so different in their ways and in their ability to relate to teenagers: my junior year English teacher, my senior year biology teacher, and senior year drama teacher who had also directed class plays I was in. Our orchestra teacher and eccentric French and Spanish teacher were no longer young, but were still excellent.

But I often wonder how much better I might have done academically, had all my high school teachers retained that inspiration and love for their subjects and their students, as did these memorable teachers.
Sounds like my school, where I had mostly old, burned out teachers who were just counting the days until their pension, and made it clear that they did not care about their students.
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Old 04-08-2019, 10:45 AM
 
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In elementary school, another common punishment was having to sit with our heads down. It would be done either to one student, to an entire class, or (since my 2nd grade teacher hated boys), all of the boys.


In kindergarten, we had a board game with fake, plastic apples. Somebody falsely accused me of eating one of the apples. I explained that I did not do so, but the teacher did not believe me. I told her to count the apples, so she could see none were missing, but she refused to do so. My punishment was to sit with my head down for the rest of the day, and was permanently banned from playing with any of the board games.


For the next several days, I was absent due to a sore throat. Everybody believed that it was due to swallowing the fake apple. But I believe that I got it from the germs on the table that had I had to have my face touching all day when I had to sit with my head down. In retrospect, I should have asked my doctor for a note saying that my sore throat was due to germs, and not due to swallowing any objects. But a kindergarten student isn't going to think that way, and my parents never advocated for me when I was punished for things I didn't do.
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Old 04-08-2019, 04:54 PM
 
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My brother had a 2nd grade teacher that it took awhile for the parents to catch on - the kid's stories were just not believable.

Putting kids heads in the toilet, slamming their fingers in the door jam, I can't remember what all else.

She also had the smart reading group, the medium reading group, and the dumb reading group. (Of course, all classes had that but they were called Blue Jays and Cardinals, not smart and dumb).

She was fired after about a month. And it was really weird, how the family simply didn't believe their kids for awhile.
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Old 04-08-2019, 05:28 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mitsguy2001 View Post
... But a kindergarten student isn't going to think that way, and my parents never advocated for me when I was punished for things I didn't do.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ClaraC View Post
My brother had a 2nd grade teacher that it took awhile for the parents to catch on - the kid's stories were just not believable.

Putting kids heads in the toilet, slamming their fingers in the door jam, I can't remember what all else.

She also had the smart reading group, the medium reading group, and the dumb reading group. (Of course, all classes had that but they were called Blue Jays and Cardinals, not smart and dumb).

She was fired after about a month. And it was really weird, how the family simply didn't believe their kids for awhile.
It's changing some now, and possibly part of why teachers receive such backlash, but there was a culture that teachers would never do anything like "that," whatever "that" was. Much of the time the culture was you got punished twice -- once in school, then again at home for getting punished in school. And of course the belief that "students were just making things up."

There are finally enough parents who experienced too many things first hand, to just dismiss the warning signs. Today, teachers wonder why those parents who weren't believed when they were kids now don't believe them.
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Old 04-08-2019, 05:55 PM
 
Location: Nebraska
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Azureth View Post
There is a punishment I remember me and others having at the school I went to when I was 7 or 8 where if you got in trouble, they would put you in a corner for 10-15 minutes and put a paper bag over your head, like the one you used to get in grocery stores. I remember when my mom found out she pulled me from the school fast. It took place in Albuquerque NM in the early 90s and it was a private school. I actually talked to my dad about it who confirmed it all.

I distinctly remember my last day as I was walking out a kid I was friends with was in some office with a paper bag over his head with eye holes, something they didn't always do. I am just curious if this was some

kind of common punishment or if my school was just sadistic lol.

A paper bag?
Heck the NUNS in my local school were really strict, they used PLASTIC bags.
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Old 04-08-2019, 06:21 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunluvver2 View Post
A paper bag?
Heck the NUNS in my local school were really strict, they used PLASTIC bags.


I went to Catholic school, and got into trouble fairly often, mostly for talking. But I don't remember any punishment beyond missing recess. In the older grades I would have to stay after school to clean the convent chapel. I remember one of the nuns bringing us ( I was never the only one) cookies and soda. I was amazed the nuns had soda, it was a rare treat at home.
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Old 04-08-2019, 06:56 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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Elementary - I think there was standing in the corner in early grades; paddling in principal’s office in older grades. I was never disciplined, myself.

Junior High - I don’t remember

High School - Seventh hour, which was detention after school. I experienced this once and cannot remember why. It was real lively though. To me it seemed a lot of the boys were almost out of control. These kids were probably not college material. I wonder how many of them died in Vietnam.
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Old 04-08-2019, 07:23 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
It's changing some now, and possibly part of why teachers receive such backlash, but there was a culture that teachers would never do anything like "that," whatever "that" was. Much of the time the culture was you got punished twice -- once in school, then again at home for getting punished in school. And of course the belief that "students were just making things up."

There are finally enough parents who experienced too many things first hand, to just dismiss the warning signs. Today, teachers wonder why those parents who weren't believed when they were kids now don't believe them.
Exactly! When I have children in school, I will never allow them to be treated the way my teachers treated me. Also, since I understand how powerless a student is against a teacher or a school, I will always advocate for my children in a way that my parents and others from my generation did not advocate for me and for other students. Teachers don't realize that the "teacher is always right" attitude has backfired against teachers.


The other problem is how teachers always seem to stick together, creating an us vs them atmosphere. Whenever I post about my experience, the teachers who post on this forum either say that I'm lying, or that I deserved whatever treatment I was given, or that my experiences are "anecdotal" and not supported by "peer reviewed" research. That is, even though they do not know any of the teachers that I have posted about. Automatically siding with the teacher creates and us vs them atmosphere, which is not in the best interest of anybody involved.
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