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Old 04-11-2019, 12:06 PM
Status: "PSALM 91" (set 7 days ago)
 
3,951 posts, read 3,172,213 times
Reputation: 5157

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Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
While it's understandable that some students will need accomodations, the school subject of English is very intertwined with reading and writing.

How can skills be truly assessed when students are allowed to not read or write? That 's the conundrum for English teachers.

Honestly, wouldn't most students pass if they could listen to a book on tape and then verbally parrot back what they heard?

I can see both sides of this. I do get that the school has to comply.
Would you expect a paralyzed child to play a sport at the same level as an able bodied child?

No?

Because it is the same thing.

My son has brain based disabilities that affect his reading, writing, and thinking skills. They impact the way he processes information and the way he expresses information. Although he has improved significantly, and can continue to improve and work around these impairments, they will be with him his whole life.

They don't offer these accommodations to everyone else so that, in your words, they can "verbally parrot back they heard" because 90% of students learn fine in the traditional way. (Although I disagree that everyone easily retains information that they hear). Furthermore, giving a speech about a book or a presentation in front of the class is not just "parroting" a book; it is reinterpeting it and dare I say is more challenging for the average high school student to do well.

The schools cater to the 90%, but they must try to provide a fair, free, and equal education.

It is in no way fair to make a child struggle with a print version of a book when the print literally moves around on the page for him. Why not allow him to listen to it because that is the way his brain processes works best? It would be like insisting that the paralyzed child walk.

The general treatment of children with learning disabilities is absolutely shameful in this country. But that is probably another thread.

Last edited by calgirlinnc; 04-11-2019 at 12:17 PM..

 
Old 04-11-2019, 12:18 PM
 
768 posts, read 1,398,198 times
Reputation: 1313
Goodness, it seems most of the replies have nothing to do with your question. The school crafted this 504 and put in accommodations they thought were appropriate, that's already done. The accommodations seem reasonable for someone with dyslexia, which is beside the point. Obviously the school thought they were reasonable if they created this particular 504 plan.

A 504 plan is for individuals with disabilities that may not fall under IDEA. There's no certain number of accommodations that would now qualify you for an IEP. It doesn't work like that.

There are always stubborn teachers who don't want to do any extra work and think individualizing education or doing something different based on the student's needs is outside of their job description. A 504 is a legally binding document that must be followed. If the plan was not followed, the parent has legal recourse. I would definitely go to the principal and let them know that teachers not following the plan is not acceptable. There should be no wiggle room for not following a 504 plan. Make sure you read up a little, so you know your rights (https://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/section-504-2/). The law is meant to protect you from teachers like this.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 12:19 PM
Status: "PSALM 91" (set 7 days ago)
 
3,951 posts, read 3,172,213 times
Reputation: 5157
Quote:
Originally Posted by wildflower_FL View Post
I have dyslexia and both my kids have dyslexia. I taught my kids how to read and write, so my son ended up being able to fly under the radar until 9th grade. His reading and writing have always been above grade level, so it is mostly organization, working speed and spelling that have been a problem for him. He's in AP English and would benefit from receiving accommodations in that class, but it isn't happening and there doesn't seem to be much we can do about it.

My experience is the 504 is mostly good for extra time on college boards exams, but otherwise, very few teachers will allow a student to use accommodations to get an A or B in the class. They don't feel it is fair to them and the other students, so they make it nearly impossible for a student to use them. A common tactic seems to be to have a sub on a major test and so if your child asks for extra time, the sub refuses it because they have no knowledge about this or authority to grant extra time. By the time the test is finally graded, the marking period is past and there isn't much one can do about it. It very much seems like the accommodations may only be used to prevent the student from failing and the teacher will intimidate and insult a student that self advocates.

My attempts to meet with the AP about this have always ended with the teacher academically sabotaging one of my son's major assignments afterwards, so we've found it is best to focus on what is within your child's control. In my son's case, it is very clear that they don't want the accommodations followed and they don't want to get caught not following them and they have a decent amount of experience in that department.
This is really interesting and I am so impressed that your son in in AP English! That's fantastic!

Your last 2 paragraphs are really sad and I am not surprised at all.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 12:20 PM
Status: "PSALM 91" (set 7 days ago)
 
3,951 posts, read 3,172,213 times
Reputation: 5157
Quote:
Originally Posted by TXRunner View Post
Goodness, it seems most of the replies have nothing to do with your question. The school crafted this 504 and put in accommodations they thought were appropriate, that's already done. The accommodations seem reasonable for someone with dyslexia, which is beside the point. Obviously the school thought they were reasonable if they created this particular 504 plan.

A 504 plan is for individuals with disabilities that may not fall under IDEA. There's no certain number of accommodations that would now qualify you for an IEP. It doesn't work like that.

There are always stubborn teachers who don't want to do any extra work and think individualizing education or doing something different based on the student's needs is outside of their job description. A 504 is a legally binding document that must be followed. If the plan was not followed, the parent has legal recourse. I would definitely go to the principal and let them know that teachers not following the plan is not acceptable. There should be no wiggle room for not following a 504 plan. Make sure you read up a little, so you know your rights (https://www.greatschools.org/gk/articles/section-504-2/). The law is meant to protect you from teachers like this.
Thank you!

I would give you a big hug if I could!
 
Old 04-11-2019, 01:12 PM
 
36,917 posts, read 14,233,228 times
Reputation: 23394
An alternative Language Arts class would likely better meet the son's needs and might be a better use of the OP's time and advocacy skills than to continue seeking ways to force this English teacher into providing him IEP accommodations.

Surely, there are other HS students who need an alternative Language Arts class. Surely, there are other parents who would willing to advocate for that.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 01:14 PM
 
36,917 posts, read 14,233,228 times
Reputation: 23394
An alternative Language Arts class would likely better meet the son's needs and might be a better use of the OP's time and advocacy skills than to continue seeking ways to force this English teacher into providing him IEP accommodations.

Surely, there are other HS students who need an alternative Language Arts class.

Surely, there are other parents who would join forces with the OP to advocate that the school offer this.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 01:18 PM
 
10,724 posts, read 8,184,819 times
Reputation: 26808
By the way, I wasn't saying anything against the OP. I was just saying that I could see how challenging this would be for a teacher.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 01:52 PM
Status: "PSALM 91" (set 7 days ago)
 
3,951 posts, read 3,172,213 times
Reputation: 5157
Quote:
Originally Posted by charlygal View Post
By the way, I wasn't saying anything against the OP. I was just saying that I could see how challenging this would be for a teacher.
OK, thanks.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 02:41 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,315 posts, read 3,206,945 times
Reputation: 13135
Let me start by saying that the teacher should be following the 504 to the letter. It's not her domain to decide which accommodations are reasonable and which aren't. That said:

Quote:
Originally Posted by calgirlinnc View Post
Oral testing (someone can read it to him and he can answer verbally)/separate testing
Audio books
Not having to copy from the board
Typing
Being graded for spelling
Not having to read aloud in front of peers
Shortened assignments (she's done this a little bit but only gives partial credit because he didn't do the full assignment, even though that's not how it's supposed to work)
Alternate assignments
Some of these, in an English class, verge on being modifications rather than accommodations. If a class is modified, meaning the student is being assigned work below grade level or not wholly aligned with state standards for the subject area and/or the approved curriculum, then that's supposed to be noted on the students' transcripts. Standardization of grading requirements, teaching the district/school's curriculum with fidelity, and adherence to state standards are major professional responsibilities for the teacher of a core subject area class at an accredited high school class, as otherwise a, say, English I credit doesn't really mean anything when put toward graduation, or to a college admission committee. This REALLY needs to be hammered out at an IEP meeting so everything is transparent.

I would also observe that some of these are things a high school student could well be responsible for him or herself, such as obtaining texts as audio (youtube is a great place to start for free material - kind people have read aloud a ton of common academic texts for just this purpose), or finding an electronic copy of the text and having the computer robo-read it aloud. Copying from the board - does he have a cell phone? He could just take a photo of the notes, for example. You mention that you've requested he be sent to test in the resource room, but that's something he needs to just do himself - Ms. So-and-So gives him the test, he says, "Thanks, Ms. So-and-so, I'll be back when I'm finished" and he goes to the resource room to have it read aloud. If she stands in the way of him going, then she's out of line, but I don't think she has to actively force him to go - kids can (passively or actively) decline to take advantage of available accommodations.

Again: I encourage you to stand up for your kid and make sure he gets what he needs to be successful in school. But these are just some things to keep in mind when you're thinking about HOW to apply these helps. The more he takes into his own hands, the better, both in terms of it actually getting done, and in terms of him learning to work around his challenges.
 
Old 04-11-2019, 03:20 PM
 
3,967 posts, read 3,624,150 times
Reputation: 10756
She sounds cruel.

A solution for the writing on the board - he should be able to just take a picture of the board with his phone.

You definitely need to escalate. Meeting with the teacher, head of special ed, and the principal together, and then if she doesn't comply, lawsuit is next step. I can only imagine the harm being done to your child - he is new in the high school, and then she is essentially shaming him by forcing him to do in front of others what is embarrassing for him.

He does need to be qualified for special ed, more than just a 504. This definitely is IEP territory.
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