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Old 04-13-2019, 08:09 PM
 
6,740 posts, read 3,643,033 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by calgirlinnc View Post
...

For example, when there is a sub in my son's foreign language class, students are usually given word searches. My son can't do a word search (finding a word backwards and diagonally just won't happen) but after a quick email to the teacher at the beginning of the year, she just excuses him from those. It isn't a big deal.....
Something to consider. My wife, who is dyslexic, likes to do the word searches because they help train her mind to function around the dyslexia. She uses an ap on her tablet to do them nightly. You might consider trying them to see if they help rather than avoiding them.



Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
...What you have done should resolve the issue of the one teacher’s laundry list, so good for that, but you should be aware there will be unintended consequences - four years worth of them. While the particulars will probably stay with just his classroom teachers, the fact that Ms. Calgirlinnc reported a teacher to the district and created trouble will not. Your child will now be part of the teachers’ lounge lore, with you fitting quite nicely into the “helicopter parent from Hell” category, and anything you or the principal try to do will not end it and, matter of fact, will only make it worse. The relationship between your child and his teachers will become stiffer, they will try to be professional but they won’t be able to help it, what just happened will be in the back of their mind and most will be wary. A surprisingly high percentage of his teachers, either now or in the future, will just “A” your child out theorizing it will keep you off their back, therefore off the district’s radar. They will ask nothing of your child. That might sound nice, but it means your child will not be properly academically challenged during high school.
....
This is a real issue that goes way beyond this thread that needs to be discussed. School systems, esp smaller districts like ours, have an almost immune reaction to anyone who challenges them. And they have long memories. Challenge the school system and your child will pay the price. Even if you win, your child will pay for it. The school system uses this to keep the parents in line. With my kids now out of school, I no longer have to keep quiet. But the superintendent gone too along with some of his policies, so many things have become moot. Just wish we'd had an effective way to challenge those policies when they could have helped.

 
Old 04-13-2019, 08:21 PM
 
4,010 posts, read 3,245,521 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Something to consider. My wife, who is dyslexic, likes to do the word searches because they help train her mind to function around the dyslexia. She uses an ap on her tablet to do them nightly. You might consider trying them to see if they help rather than avoiding them.

Thank you for the suggestion. In all fairness, I think it is one thing to do them in English, and another thing to do them in a foreign language.


Quote:
This is a real issue that goes way beyond this thread that needs to be discussed. School systems, esp smaller districts like ours, have an almost immune reaction to anyone who challenges them. And they have long memories. Challenge the school system and your child will pay the price. Even if you win, your child will pay for it. The school system uses this to keep the parents in line. With my kids now out of school, I no longer have to keep quiet. But the superintendent gone too along with some of his policies, so many things have become moot. Just wish we'd had an effective way to challenge those policies when they could have helped.

Agree.
 
Old 04-14-2019, 12:29 PM
 
114 posts, read 98,142 times
Reputation: 47
Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
Something to consider. My wife, who is dyslexic, likes to do the word searches because they help train her mind to function around the dyslexia. She uses an ap on her tablet to do them nightly. You might consider trying them to see if they help rather than avoiding them.





This is a real issue that goes way beyond this thread that needs to be discussed. School systems, esp smaller districts like ours, have an almost immune reaction to anyone who challenges them. And they have long memories. Challenge the school system and your child will pay the price. Even if you win, your child will pay for it. The school system uses this to keep the parents in line. With my kids now out of school, I no longer have to keep quiet. But the superintendent gone too along with some of his policies, so many things have become moot. Just wish we'd had an effective way to challenge those policies when they could have helped.
I see a direct correlation between how you approach a problem and the school's response/reaction. If you come in emotionally or guns blazing the school/teachers can be defensive. Approach things calmly and logically and work together and you typically get better results. You don't always get the best result and there are times that the individuals involved need educated or trained.
 
Old 04-14-2019, 04:05 PM
 
4,010 posts, read 3,245,521 times
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Because there has been so much discussion of accommodations vs. modifications and 504s vs. IEPs, I thought this might be useful information. This is from the state dyslexia handbook;

"Students with dyslexia who receive dyslexia instruction that contains the components described in this chapter will be better equipped to meet the demands of grade-level or course instruction. In addition to dyslexia instruction, accommodations provide the student with dyslexia effective and equitable access to grade-level or course instruction in the general education classroom. Accommodations are not one size fits all; rather, the impact of dyslexia on each individual student determines the necessary accommodation. Listed below are examples of reasonable classroom accommodations:
• Copies of notes (e.g., teacher- or peer-provided)
• Note-taking assistance
• Additional time on class assignments and tests
• Reduced/shortened assignments (e.g., chunking assignments into manageable units, fewer items
given on a classroom test or homework assignment without eliminating concepts, or student
planner to assist with assignments)
• Alternative test location that provides a quiet environment and reduces distractions
• Priority seating assignment
• Oral reading of directions or written material
• Word banks
• Audiobooks
• Text to speech
• Speech to text
• Electronic spellers
• Electronic dictionaries
• Formula charts
• Adaptive learning tools and features in software programs

Accommodations are changes to materials, actions, or techniques, including the use of technology, that enable students with disabilities to participate meaningfully in grade-level or course instruction. The use of accommodations occurs primarily during classroom instruction as educators use various instructional strategies to meet the needs of each student. A student may need an accommodation only temporarily while learning a new skill, or a student might require the accommodation throughout the school year and over several years including beyond graduation."

The handbook is clear that these are for 504s or IEPs; the general procedure seems to be to start with a 504 and move to an IEP if necessary.

https://tea.texas.gov/WorkArea/Downl...id=51539627235

Last edited by calgirlinnc; 04-14-2019 at 04:15 PM..
 
Old 04-15-2019, 12:36 AM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,421 posts, read 3,277,916 times
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Interesting. In Alaska, TTS and other forms of having materials read aloud is considered an accommodation in all content areas EXCEPT reading, where's it's considered a modification and would result in a course being "asterisk'd" on that student's transcript.
 
Old 04-15-2019, 09:54 AM
 
Location: My beloved Bluegrass
14,614 posts, read 10,521,232 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
Interesting. In Alaska, TTS and other forms of having materials read aloud is considered an accommodation in all content areas EXCEPT reading, where's it's considered a modification and would result in a course being "asterisk'd" on that student's transcript.
That is appropriate because reading is the content in Reading. Reading is not the content is science, social studies, or math, it is a means to get to the content in those subjects.
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Old 04-15-2019, 12:59 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,421 posts, read 3,277,916 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
That is appropriate because reading is the content in Reading. Reading is not the content is science, social studies, or math, it is a means to get to the content in those subjects.
Oh, agreed. What's weird to me is that Texas doesn't seem to see it that way for reading and English classes when covering reading standards.
 
Old 04-15-2019, 01:46 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
Oh, agreed. What's weird to me is that Texas doesn't seem to see it that way for reading and English classes when covering reading standards.
I taught college English for over 10 years and I have to say there is another side to this.

If the objective is for a student to appreciate and demonstrate an understanding of seminal works of literature, say "Wuthering Heights", then whether that comes from visual or audio reading doesn't make much of a difference. If a LD student is deprived of experiencing great works of literature because state standards insist upon visual reading, we are culturally depriving that LD student and dismissing the objective of fair and equal education.

"Wuthering Heights" is no different than understanding the causes and outcomes of WWII, for example. IMO, what matters is that students keep learning, and not so much how they do it. I believe one of the major failures of schools is catering to one type of learner.

Now if the test is "look at this word and tell me what it is", that is a different measure of "reading". And it is not, may I add, what my son is being tested on.
 
Old 04-15-2019, 02:21 PM
 
Location: interior Alaska
4,421 posts, read 3,277,916 times
Reputation: 13539
Quote:
Originally Posted by calgirlinnc View Post
I taught college English for over 10 years and I have to say there is another side to this.

If the objective is for a student to appreciate and demonstrate an understanding of seminal works of literature, say "Wuthering Heights", then whether that comes from visual or audio reading doesn't make much of a difference. If a LD student is deprived of experiencing great works of literature because state standards insist upon visual reading, we are culturally depriving that LD student and dismissing the objective of fair and equal education.

"Wuthering Heights" is no different than understanding the causes and outcomes of WWII, for example. IMO, what matters is that students keep learning, and not so much how they do it. I believe one of the major failures of schools is catering to one type of learner.

Now if the test is "look at this word and tell me what it is", that is a different measure of "reading". And it is not, may I add, what my son is being tested on.
Sure, which is why it's an accommodation for literature but a modification for reading. I don't know whether Texas splits out language arts/reading/literature/etc. standards at the secondary level, or just lumps them all together under English, but in Alaska they're categorized separately in the state standards and on the state exams. At schools where they're all taught in one integrated English class, the teacher is expected to apply the accommodations appropriately depending on which standards the day's lesson is primarily addressing.
 
Old 04-15-2019, 02:31 PM
 
4,010 posts, read 3,245,521 times
Reputation: 5317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Frostnip View Post
Sure, which is why it's an accommodation for literature but a modification for reading. I don't know whether Texas splits out language arts/reading/literature/etc. standards at the secondary level, or just lumps them all together under English, but in Alaska they're categorized separately in the state standards and on the state exams. At schools where they're all taught in one integrated English class, the teacher is expected to apply the accommodations appropriately depending on which standards the day's lesson is primarily addressing.
The issue could be solved by offering a class in ELA specifically for dyslexic students, but I don't know where that is actually an option. I've never seen it.
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