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Old 04-14-2019, 03:50 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 854,499 times
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Autodidacticism

Rather than sit in community college classrooms for five or six years, I thought I might attempt to teach myself the following subjects, using the internet and books (see complete list, below*):
Quote:
Technical Writing
Accounting
QuickBooks
Business Math
Business Law
Marketing
Finance
Corporate Finance
Management
Hardware & Software Fundamentals
Programming: Beginning, Intermediate, Web
Security, Firewalls, Disaster Recovery
Web Design (CSS)
Photoshop
What are the most commonly recommended books in these areas?
Anyone have any luck teaching themselves these subjects?

Quote:
*
English: 3 hours
ENGL 216 Technical Writing (3)

Accounting: 14 hours
ACCT 111 Small Business Accounting (3)
ACCT 121 Principles of Accounting I (4)
ACCT 122 Principles of Accounting II (4)
ACCT 125 Computerized Accounting - QuickBooks (3)

Business: 34 hours
BSAD 111 Introduction to Business (3)
BSAD 112 Business Math (3)
BSAD 119 Entrepreneurship - Planning and Introduction (3)
BSAD 211 Principles of Management (3)
BSAD 219 Business Models (3)
BSAD 220 E-Commerce, Crowdfunding and Marketing (3)
BSAD 223 Finance and Funding Start-ups (3)
BSAD 224 Pitching Your Start-up (1)
BSAD 232 Business Law I (3)
BSAD 240 Principles of Marketing (3)
BSAD 245 Corporate Finance (3)
BSAD 270 Business Ethics (3)

Computer: 50 hours
ISCS 112 Computer Hardware Fundamentals (3)
ISCS 113 Introduction to Computer Science (3)
ISCS 114 Computer Software (3)
ISCS 115 Introduction to Web Computing (3)
ISCS 117 Introduction to Unix/Linux (3)
ISCS 120 Introduction to Programming I (4)
ISCS 122 Computer Networks (3)
ISCS 125 Introduction to Programming II (4)
ISCS 171 Computer and Security Fundamentals (3)
ISCS 175 Disaster Recovery (3)
ISCS 215 Intermediate Programming (3)
ISCS 219 Web Programming I (3)
ISCS 229 Web Programming II (3)
ISCS 271 Firewalls (3)
ISCS 273 Computer and Network Defense and Countermeasures (3)
ISCS 275 Cyber Ethics (3)

Media Arts: 53 hours
MART 111 Introduction to Social Media Basics (2)
MART 115 Social Media Basics (2)
MART 118 Communication Design (3)
MART 119 Digital Skills (3)
MART 121 Adobe Illustrator (3)
MART 123 Adobe InDesign (3)
MART 127 Design by Nature (3)
MART 130 Web Design I (3)
MART 170 Writing for Mass Media (3)
MART 180 Photoshop I (3)
MART 186 Scanning Techniques (1)
MART 187 Electronic Color Theory and Practice (1)
MART 188 Adobe Lightroom (2)
MART 189 Copyright and Media (1)
MART 200 Copyright, Media, and Society (3)
MART 201 Applying Social Media Techniques I (2)
MART 202 Applying Social Media Techniques II (2)
MART 228 Web Design in the Real World (2)
MART 229 Introduction to WordPress (2)
MART 230 Web Design II: CSS Responsive Web Design (3)
MART 280 Photoshop II (3)
MART 284 Advanced Digital Projects (3)

OFTC 111 Business Software Essentials I (4)

PHOT 111 Digital Photography I (3)
PHOT 210 Digital Photography II (3)
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Old 04-14-2019, 04:00 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
6,226 posts, read 2,196,516 times
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You can only teach yourself so much. Some fields are a matter of simply absorbing information, but many of the things you list require that information plus learning how to apply it - and things like educated judgment, esthetics, decision-making, which can't really be self-taught. To learn any four or five of the general categories you've listed could take several years of not just reading and webinars, but engagement with experienced mentors who can help you stay on track and really learn what a topic is about.

That's, um, called college.

So in five or six years you can have read a lot, tinkered a little, joined a few MeetUp groups about photography and entrepreneurism, maybe gotten a little working experience in one area or another... or have put in more formal, guided, and likely more valuable time checking off those boxes in progress towards an encompassing degree.

It may be my own prejudice and experience, but the notion that you can read your way to graphic, visual and online skills is particularly grating. I've worked with and around too many people who had no real gift for these endeavors but had gotten A's in all the classes and stayed current with all the webinars.

I am extensively autodidacticized, myself... but across decades and with the key and foundational and "developmental" parts coming from formal education, evaluation and guidance. OTOH, the (all too common) idea that someone can only learn from a formal class or teacher makes me giggle hysterically.
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Old 04-14-2019, 04:20 PM
 
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@Quietude: I understand what you're saying. I'm a violinist and violin teacher and am always amused and not a little exasperated when people attempt to teach themselves the violin. They always, if the desire to play persists, find their way to a teacher--and have to unlearn everything they "taught" themselves. You can strum a little on the guitar, but you need the violin teacher. It's just too complicated.

In making my list I did recognize that many of the subject areas have to be done in a classroom setting, particularly the computer courses. There's nothing here but a big state university, and these courses are vocational, mostly, and not taught in university. It would entail me moving out of state, and I'm not feeling well.
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Old 04-14-2019, 05:36 PM
 
Location: League City
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If this is for self-fulfillment, then many of those topics can be found on the web for free. If it's for career advancement, it may be better to just go to the community college. There are a lot of intangibles you get just from being there. One is the relationship the college already has with local industry that puts you at an advantage. And then the possibility of networking with teachers, other students, and even employers at job fairs is another. There are many more things too.

But still you can find a lot of courses on web design, web development, software development, security, finance, marketing, and math on sites like EdX and Coursera. You can audit the courses or pay for a certificate after passing a select group of courses. The courses are typically created by well known universities. Another paid option is Udemy, and those courses are typically cheap. But those courses are created by individuals and not world wide universities like EdX and Coursera.

If you are willing to pay a few hundred dollars for a yearly subscription, then Pluralsight has a lot of good quality courses on software development, web design, security, and photoshop type software tools.

A fantastic resource for software books, business books, web design books, is Safari Books Online. That site has online books AND courses. But it too is a few hundred dollars a year. It is well worth it, however. I no longer subscribe to Pluralsight, but I have kept a Safari Books subscription for about the last decade.

Last edited by DanielWayne; 04-14-2019 at 05:44 PM..
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Old 04-14-2019, 05:56 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 854,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielWayne View Post
If this is for self-fulfillment, then many of those topics can be found on the web for free. If it's for career advancement, it may be better to just go to the community college. There are a lot of intangibles you get just from being there. One is the relationship the college already has with local industry that puts you at an advantage. And then the possibility of networking with teachers, other students, and even employers at job fairs is another. There are many more things too.

But still you can find a lot of courses on web design, web development, software development, security, finance, marketing, and math on sites like EdX and Coursera. You can audit the courses or pay for a certificate after passing a select group of courses. The courses are typically created by well known universities. Another paid option is Udemy, and those courses are typically cheap. But those courses are created by individuals and not world wide universities like EdX and Coursera.

If you are willing to pay a few hundred dollars for a yearly subscription, then Pluralsight has a lot of good quality courses on software development, web design, security, and photoshop type software tools.

A fantastic resource for software books, business books, web design books, is Safari Books Online. That site has online books AND courses. But it too is a few hundred dollars a year. It is well worth it, however. I no longer subscribe to Pluralsight, but I have kept a Safari Books subscription for about the last decade.
Valuable input; thank you. I just sold an online business I had for 20 years, which is being incorporated into another business and will soon be disappeared. It was outmoded with respect to design and management. So I'm not pursuing this for self-fulfillment but to update my skills and start another business. Twenty+ years ago it wasn't that hard to teach yourself html and a little JAVA, copy code from here and there, and open a business. But my skills are hopelessly outdated.

I think I would enjoy interacting with people versus sitting at desk 12 or more hours a day, figuring this stuff out by myself. It's gotten a lot more complicated.
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Old 04-14-2019, 06:27 PM
 
Location: South Australia
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The typical autodidactic I've run across tends to be an undereducated person with a poor teacher.

The problem with self teaching is you do not have a reliable person to answer the inevitable questions which arise. Plus you don't know what you don't know.

It's over 30 years since I was at University. I have never stopped learning, especially in history, which I still love. However, my reading is in no way equal to a post graduate degree, which would be structured and reinforced in a way my reading is not.

No study is wasted. Knowledge is worthwhile for its own sake.

The proposed course of study seems interesting. I guess it depends on the reason. Imo impatience is a poor reason to try to self teach. Its suggests you will lack the patience to teach yourself.

I'm assuming your IQ is not in the genius range. I am unconvinced that even the brightest students are capable of teaching themselves a complex course.

That's just my two cents. Good luck
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Old 04-14-2019, 06:31 PM
 
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@Daniel: Here are the links to the resources you cited, plus I added one:

• EdX https://www.edx.org Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/EdX

• Coursera https://www.coursera.org Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coursera

• Khan Academy https://www.khanacademy.org
Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Khan_Academy

• Pluralsight https://www.pluralsight.com/ Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pluralsight

• Safari Books Online https://www.oreilly.com
Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Safari_Books_Online

• Udemy https://www.udemy.com/ Wikipedia: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Udemy

Thanks again!

Last edited by KaraZetterberg153; 04-14-2019 at 06:41 PM..
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Old 04-14-2019, 06:40 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 854,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by c charlie View Post
The typical autodidactic I've run across tends to be an undereducated person with a poor teacher.
That's amusing. Not dissimilar to the notion that a person who represents himself in court has a fool for a client.


Quote:
Originally Posted by c charlie View Post
The proposed course of study seems interesting. I guess it depends on the reason. Imo impatience is a poor reason to try to self teach. Its suggests you will lack the patience to teach yourself.

I'm assuming your IQ is not in the genius range.
I don't follow you. Where did the "impatience" notion come from? Surely not from anything I posted. Also not entirely sure why you're assuming my IQ is not in the genius range.
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Old 04-14-2019, 07:39 PM
 
Location: League City
3,325 posts, read 6,490,559 times
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I've read that Khan Academy is excellent.

I've got 2 more things that I thought of, then I am done. These may or may not help you on your journey. But sometimes by turning over every single stone, you stumble on something helpful that you didn't even consider.

Udacity - This site has a paid option for lots of software and business programs. I did a program from them about 3 years ago, and I got recruiter emails afterward. But their model of operation has changed a lot (and price went up, too), and I can't speak of how effective they are for employer recognition. They do provide things like resume review.
Udacity

Freecodecamp - I have dabbled in this since it is free, but I didn't go too far into it. The content is ok, but I think you can get a lot of social resources from it like networking and collaborating with others if you decide to really get involved.
https://www.freecodecamp.org/

Good luck with your new business. You have a lot of fortitude if you are your own boss and I commend you!
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Old 04-14-2019, 07:47 PM
 
2,570 posts, read 854,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DanielWayne View Post
Good luck with your new business. You have a lot of fortitude if you are your own boss and I commend you!
I'll add those two to the list. Thanks!

And thanks for the well wishes!!
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