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Old 05-04-2019, 12:36 PM
 
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I skipped the second grade. Had no problem fitting in academically or socially. Graduated high school at 16, bought my first car, and started college at 17.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:40 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
Concur. I'd be very hesitant were he not close to age for the next grade.

I was a tag-ender, often the youngest child in the room, and clearly remember the frustration of being developmentally behind all the other kids. (I was GATE etc. all though junior high and an elite high school, so I had the chops... I just hadn't grown them yet. )
Kids develop (socially, physically, etc.) at different ages, in my observation. I don't quite understand your post. I was one of the two youngest in the class, too, but didn't really observe any differences along those lines, except normal individual differences. IMO, kids can always find their posse, even if it's a posse of only 3. They bond by common interests and personality types., usually. A class isn't a homogeneous phenomenon; there's lots of human variety even within a single, narrow age-cohort.

Also, in HS you can create your own program to some extent, and choose classes, that have older kids in them, or younger, as you wish, so you have additional environments from which to choose friends of different ages.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:44 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Originally Posted by bobspez View Post
I skipped the second grade. Had no problem fitting in academically or socially. Graduated high school at 16, bought my first car, and started college at 17.
I've seen students enter college at 17, when I was a college academic advisor, and I've had friends who entered at 16. Everyone fit in fine; they were mature enough. In fact, in some ways they were more mature than some others in their freshman class. And college freshman classes are so large, even in small colleges, that one can usually find a kindred spirit or two, if not in the freshman class, in the sophomore class.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
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I skipped a similar grade, was in the gifted program, which was called the "optional program" in my city, and had quite a hard time emotionally in high school and early college.

Academically sure, it was fine. But while I was and am an outgoing person, I still suffered when it came to relational issues. I faced certain developmental social milestones when I wasn't quite ready f for them.

A lot would depend on your son's personality and ability to handle life when he is faced with a challenge. Maybe you should look around at other schools.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:45 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
8,576 posts, read 3,001,676 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
Kids develop (socially, physically, etc.) at different ages, in my observation. I don't quite understand your post. I was one of the two youngest in the class, too, but didn't really observe any differences along those lines, except normal individual differences.
I don't think the common difficulties of a very young child in a class, especially in the earliest grades, are any mystery. Some kids can handle it; others can't. I recall simply not being able to do things other kids could do with ease, such as cutting out a complex shape. I had/have no disabilities or anything of the kind; I was just too young to handle scissors with skill. For a few more months.

The bottom line in this issue is that a child should be mature enough to handle social and educational demands in an advanced class, as well as be intellectually developed enough.
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Old 05-04-2019, 12:47 PM
 
Location: The point of no return, er, NorCal
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
OP, I'm all for a kid skipping grades, if he can do the work. Kids who are bored in their grade are at risk of giving up on school. Some gifted kids drop out by HS. I've known kids who were 2 grades ahead, and had no social issues. It depends on the kid and on the other kids in the class, too, I guess.

I think it's important to keep kids challenged and interested. My opinion seems to be the minority one on this forum, but I'm sticking with it. I think the alternative Old Hag presented, of selective course-skipping, if that's an option for you, sounds like a good compromise. In HS, he may have more options than waiting 'til 10th grade to take university courses, depending on your local college or university. If they have a gifted kids' program, that allows admission for HS freshmen or even middle school kids, that would be worth considering, if he's advanced enough at that point. Some level of college math classes, for example.
This.

We actually pulled our older two from their local schools because they weren't challenging enough. GATE is only offered from 3rd to 5th grade in our district. Then it's the IBMYP and IBDP. My eldest daughter's 6th-grade teachers kept talking about how rigorous the MYP is and the increase in workload. But she found it unchallenging and was bored. Her favorite class was Mandarin and she's continued those studies, but the others were simply not accelerated or challenging enough. Their accelerated pacing is only 3-4 weeks ahead of the "normal" track students. That doesn't help when you have two kids that thrive in 11/12th+ instruction. My district doesn't offer traditional grade-skipping, either. I supplemented a lot of her work outside school. She was already writing MLA papers in 6th grade, read several high school classics in 6th/7th, and she's read several college coursebooks and even books I've read for grad school. Homeschooling allows for greater flexibility. My current 6th grader completed all of her coursework in four months and now she's working on 7th-grade coursework and supplementing math with algebra 1. Our charter school has a grade acceleration program for <9th graders that allows students to complete two grades in a school year. That is our plan for this coming school year. At the high school level, my oldest can pursue concurrent enrollment. She'd opt for it now but most JC and state colleges here set the age requirement at 16 or 10th grade.
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Old 05-04-2019, 02:14 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Quietude View Post
I don't think the common difficulties of a very young child in a class, especially in the earliest grades, are any mystery. Some kids can handle it; others can't. I recall simply not being able to do things other kids could do with ease, such as cutting out a complex shape. I had/have no disabilities or anything of the kind; I was just too young to handle scissors with skill. For a few more months.

The bottom line in this issue is that a child should be mature enough to handle social and educational demands in an advanced class, as well as be intellectually developed enough.
This is a good point. Parents should observe their kids at all kinds of tasks, before making a big decision, like skipping a kid, or entering them in school a year early. Usually, if the child has been in preschool, the teaches will provide feedback on that score, so parents can factor that into a decision, before first grade.

I wasn't sure what you were referring to: middle-school and HS development & fitting in (as you referenced in your post), or something else. Thanks for clarifying.
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Old 05-04-2019, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
I wasn't sure what you were referring to: middle-school and HS development & fitting in (as you referenced in your post), or something else. Thanks for clarifying.
I had issues in early grades because I was young for the classes; I did accelerated classes from middle school through my third and last year of high school, and again was the kid in my first college classes.
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Old 05-04-2019, 03:44 PM
 
Location: Southwest Washington State
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I might as well tell my experience. I started K when I was four. I became 5 the following month. I was always the youngest in my class. Academically I did fine except in math, which I hated, and which I refused to learn well. That part of my educational experience is on me. I should have studied and mastered that subject.

But socially, I had a hard time. My school years were not happy years. I was always out of step, or socially behind.

So much of the equation depends on the kid and his or her family life. To me it sounds as if he would benefit at least, from subject matter enhancements. He could take upper level classes but remain at his grade level, with his friends. Essentially that is what happened to me in the 7th grade. This was long ago, but those of us who tested out smart were placed in advanced math, English and Social Science in junior high. It was OK. I didn't last in math, but I enjoyed the other advanced classes.

I do think you should get input from your son. If he is highly motivated to skip a grade, then that should count for a lot. But he won't be associating as much with his old friends.

To the poster who wrote, that you always find your own posse, I have to say, "No, you don't always."
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Old 05-04-2019, 04:30 PM
 
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This is just not a one size fits everyone situation. Some kids can handle it and many others cannot. We were presented with grade skipping for our oldest. She was very mature for her age already, but I am so glad we didn't move her. She thrived being the oldest in her class and as it turned out, the kids she was taking her advanced and AP classes with were all crazy smart and they stayed ahead of the curve together. They blew through material faster than any group before or since. They were told by the school's academic coordinator that were they all in different schools, they would all be valedictorian. So, as it turns out she got what she needed by staying put.

Coincidentally, one of our sons was the youngest person in his class, but as they progressed through high school he was easily the most mature kids I knew in his age group. People are usually shocked to find out he is not our oldest child. He just carries himself with a confidence and ability to communicate that generally belongs to someone older. Soooo, age does not necessarily determine maturity level or ability to connect socially. You need to know your kid well enough to have them in the correct place and grade.

And then we have child number 3. He came along much later than the others and I am positive the subject of grade skipping is going to come up with him. My older two are on well deserved full academic scholarships with really tough degrees at university, so no slouch either one of them. My 3 year old is dancing circles around what they were doing at the same age. If he takes after his sibs personality and maturity-wise I am sure it is going to be very tempting to move him along, though I am generally not in favor...


OP I wish you the best of wisdom making this decision.
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