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Old 05-05-2019, 06:56 AM
 
94 posts, read 80,203 times
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Given his birthday I would strongly consider it. My daughter’s due date would have resulted in her currently being in 5th instead of 6th. Since she was a little early she squeaked in. Academically she is crushing it. I do worry about the social aspect. She has a few really good friends which is all anyone needs. With that said some of the kids in her grade are over a year older than her. The girls like boys and texting and she likes to climb trees and read books. That may be her personality more than her age though. I still second guess our decision but for now she is happy
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:16 AM
 
5,400 posts, read 6,550,585 times
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You ask. I wouldn't do it. There is time enough in higher grades to find opportunities to test his academic skills after his social skills have stabilized. After he has built a core of friends. After he knows his way around better.

and what is to gain by skipping him at this low grade level?

Given the teacher says he is bored, find enrichment activities, hobbies, higher level classes he can take on his own time. Get him in youth sports, art, music, dance, and definitely something he doesn't do so easily so he can learn the value of hard work.

Be creative. hire tutors. spend extra time channeling his efforts in life skill ways. My thought is you have to look at the whole child, not only the academic side.

Good luck. It must be a challenge to raise an exceedingly bright child.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:24 AM
gg
 
Location: Pittsburgh
17,961 posts, read 18,288,152 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Oldhag1 View Post
Based on his birth date, you should consider bumping him up.
I agree with this. I think moving up can be bad due to lack of development, but that won't really be an issue. I say go for it.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:36 AM
 
Location: USA
259 posts, read 78,158 times
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Go for it. It's better to keep him challenged than have him bored & disrupting the class he's now in, IMO...
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:57 AM
 
8,335 posts, read 9,102,698 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
I had a very bad experience by not being allowed to skip a grade. It was forbidden in our public school district, but in the local Catholic schools, they let many qualified students skip. I was reading long before I even started school and always got the highest scores in the school on the annual comprehensive achievement tests. I was just treading water, studying subjects at the regular grade level. Many of my friends were a year ahead of me in school, so socially and athletically, I would have fit in with the older students. Sometimes, the lack of a challenge in classes at a young age, will dampen your whole academic career.
Sorry that happened to you. That said it appears to be fairly common for many school districts to more or less forbid grade skipping.
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Old 05-05-2019, 07:58 AM
 
Location: Florida
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I was one of the oldest in my class and I skipped the second grade (I was also in the GAT program). That made me three weeks younger than the youngest kid in the class. I struggled a bit socially once I got to middle school and everyone was going through puberty before me, but I caught up by the time I got to high school. I graduated in the top 10% of the class (and would have done better had I applied myself), so I was not negatively impacted academically.

I think it worked out fine in my case and since your son will only be a week or two younger than the youngest 4th grader, I bet it will work out fine in his case, too. It will probably help him socially if you can get him into a camp or something over the summer as a rising 4th grader so he will meet and interact with children who will be in his new class.
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Old 05-05-2019, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Chicagoland
5,655 posts, read 8,676,163 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackF View Post
My son is currently a 3rd grader who’s STAR testing has him doing math on a 7th grade level and he reads on a 6.5 grade level. His teacher broached the topic with his mother and I. She says he is bored with the 3rd grade curriculum and thinks he needs more of a challenge. We’re torn, we are aware of the negative social aspects of grade-skipping, but we want him to put his best foot forward too. We would probably only consider skipping the 4th grade.

Anyone have any experience with this?
My child had the same issue in 3rd grade. She was in the gifted program in a top district but advanced for that. I worked with the teacher to get a more individualized curriculum with more challenging material (have you tried that?). I also pulled her out of school early (after lunch) to partially homeschool her for one year, if that’s an option for you.

By middle school/high school the classes were more challenging, but still relatively easy for her. So she is able to maintain straight A’s in advanced/AP classes and take on lots of extracurriculars, sports, music, volunteering, and leadership roles. And she is a very happy kid with a good social fit. In hindsight, I’m glad we did not grade-skip. I think, in the long run, it gave her more of a social and academic advantage.

Last edited by GoCUBS1; 05-05-2019 at 09:56 AM..
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Old 05-05-2019, 09:22 AM
 
Location: State of Transition
78,962 posts, read 70,797,892 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve McDonald View Post
I had a very bad experience by not being allowed to skip a grade. It was forbidden in our public school district, but in the local Catholic schools, they let many qualified students skip. I was reading long before I even started school and always got the highest scores in the school on the annual comprehensive achievement tests. I was just treading water, studying subjects at the regular grade level. Many of my friends were a year ahead of me in school, so socially and athletically, I would have fit in with the older students. Sometimes, the lack of a challenge in classes at a young age, will dampen your whole academic career.
This. I've known people, who ended up dropping out of HS, due to boredom. But as we can see from some of the personal testimonies here, it really depends on the kid, and on the school/class ambience/the character of the kids in the higher grade, as to whether the skipped child would fit in, or find at least a couple of friends.

Steve, did you ever talk to your parents, about the possibility of transferring to the Catholic school?
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Old 05-05-2019, 03:44 PM
 
2,631 posts, read 1,942,432 times
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Get the kid double promoted!!!

Quit the social junk. He's 8 years old. If a normal kid "socially" he'll socialize just the same a year ahead as he does now. Kids his age are more flexible at "age mates" than you think.

I was DP'd twice and almost a third time. Loved it! Loved it, LOVED IT!

My mom wouldn't let them DP me the third time (5A to 6A) because I was "too small." Such stupidity! I spent the 6B, 6A and 7th, and 8th grades wishing I was in that grade 1/2 year ahead of me. That's where most of my best friends were.

BTW, Too small? LOL. I pubed at 11. Hormones kicked in before 12. Way before most of the boys in my class (a year older) did. Nonetheless, In 40 years, I never got taller than 5'5" ever.

Remember, They're not DP-ing YOU - it's the kid! Boredom accomplishes nothing. My teacher (annoyed by me sitting there twiddling my thumbs and humming) found things for me to do outside of class because at 1:15 PM I had already completed everything there was to do that afternoon (that was 3A).

Just make sure he's smart because he highly values learning. Otherwise, it'll accomplish little. In the 4B, 4 or us got DP'd. One just wanted, one day, to finish school early to work in pappy's store; another just went along with it, but became a permanent A- student of no outstanding accomplishment; and another one just couldn't care less, and by 7th grade got in trouble anyway because he simply thought school was a joke. I, of course, took the signal to indicate I could do anything I wanted to do - partly due to the household I grew up in. And that's just the way it happened. Those DP's provided me with confidence and away I went!

Last edited by TwinbrookNine; 05-05-2019 at 04:51 PM..
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Old 05-05-2019, 05:34 PM
 
16,671 posts, read 14,110,185 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JackF View Post
Thanks for the response. He is one of the oldest 3rd graders at his school, he was born 9/11/09, most of his peers were born in 2010. So we’re not too worried about the age thing. Plus he is very outgoing and makes friends easily. I’m not really seeing much of a downside. Here is an article that I found on the subject, does it ring true to you as a gifted student educator?

https://theconversation.com/should-i...ed-child-66359
What makes you think he will find the 5th grade curriculum challenging?

My experience is that kids find it initially challenging because they have to work a bit harder due to what they missed but that isn’t truly a challenge. If he is profoundly gifted he will be in the same position by the end of the year.

If it were my kid I would push for a real gifted program and find outside challenges according to his tastes. Maker space, science fair, whatever.
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