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Old 05-23-2019, 01:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by phetaroi View Post
No. Not necessarily. Makes a difference what level you're talking about. Such blanket statements are ill advised.
Back in the 1950s there was an average 240+ teaching personnel / 100 non-teaching.

2008 my state was at 100 teaching personnel / 140 non-teaching. Same state has superintents making six figures plus their staff for districts with not that many kids in them.

Administration is where cuts should be made. Many focus on teachers and glance past administration.
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Old 05-23-2019, 01:39 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Back in the 1950s there was an average 240+ teaching personnel / 100 non-teaching.

2008 my state was at 100 teaching personnel / 140 non-teaching. Same state has superintents making six figures plus their staff for districts with not that many kids in them.

Administration is where cuts should be made. Many focus on teachers and glance past administration.
Back in the 1950s, high school completion rate was around 60%. You don't want to know how much lower it was for blacks.

Until fairly recently, the only testing of student achievement was College Boards.

Take off the cheap rose-colored glasses and look at the problems in 2019 terms, not Waltons nostalgia.
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Old 05-23-2019, 04:39 PM
 
3,983 posts, read 1,706,801 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Back in the 1950s there was an average 240+ teaching personnel / 100 non-teaching.

2008 my state was at 100 teaching personnel / 140 non-teaching. Same state has superintents making six figures plus their staff for districts with not that many kids in them.

Administration is where cuts should be made. Many focus on teachers and glance past administration.
What do the non-teaching personnel do? I would imagine they include paraprofessionals, school psychologists, counselors, and social workers, etc. A district with a larger population with IEPs/504 plans will probably have larger numbers of nonteaching personnel than one with a relatively small number. In 1950, those same students would likely be institutionalized/go to special schools or simply drop out because they didnít have the resources needed to graduate.
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Old 05-23-2019, 05:06 PM
 
Location: Aurora Denveralis
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Quote:
Originally Posted by RamenAddict View Post
What do the non-teaching personnel do? I would imagine they include paraprofessionals, school psychologists, counselors, and social workers, etc.
All true, but it's also true that front-office admin staff have greatly multiplied.

That running a modern school is more complex and involves more demands than sitting in an office assuming each and every teacher is doing a peachy job with every student is a good part of the explanation.
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Old 05-23-2019, 08:47 PM
 
6,859 posts, read 3,727,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LordSquidworth View Post
Back in the 1950s there was an average 240+ teaching personnel / 100 non-teaching.

2008 my state was at 100 teaching personnel / 140 non-teaching. Same state has superintents making six figures plus their staff for districts with not that many kids in them.

Administration is where cuts should be made. Many focus on teachers and glance past administration.
Agree. When my kids were in elementary, we compared by yearbook to theirs. For a school of roughly the same number of students there were roughly the same number of teachers (somewhere around 20). The big difference was the admin staff. In my school (1960s) there was a principal, secretary, janitor, and cafeteria workers. Something like 8 non teaching staff. But in my kids school there were more non teaching staff than teachers (between 25-30). That's where all the money for schools has gone. Not into teacher salaries, but admin staff.
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