U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-09-2019, 01:31 PM
 
Location: West coast
239 posts, read 76,147 times
Reputation: 321

Advertisements

Hi all.
Hey I’m going to retire in less than 3 years.
My retirement money is better than good.
I just don’t want to be a “couch potato” so I want to do things.

I have a at least a good 6 or so projects to finish.
They are old Harley’s, hot rods and stuff like that.

I also want to do the boating/fishing thing.

I kinda thought being a part time shop teacher would be cool an keep me busy.

I currently have a Class A General Engineering license
A Class B General Building License.
An electrical license.
A plumbing license and currently have 14 different pipe welding certificates that are up to date.
I used to be a union instructor.

Do any of you have any thoughts on this?

Thank you.
Andy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-09-2019, 01:45 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,535 posts, read 2,229,532 times
Reputation: 10575
In this age of non-stop screen time, I think it would be very fulfilling to get young people involved in actually working with their hands. I have great memories from wood & metal shop in 7th & 8th grade and I'm 67 now. I don't know whether it sparked my interest or I was just naturally handy, but I've been building and fixing things all my life and really enjoy it. I remember when we made a wooden boat in wood shop and the final stage was sanding it before varnishing. I thought I was done and took it to Mr. McCullough (don't even ask how his name just popped into my mind) for his approval and he just took out his pencil, scribbled all over it and just said, "More". I'd say go for it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 08:22 AM
 
Location: Texas
35,208 posts, read 19,266,750 times
Reputation: 20835
As a retired HS teacher, I say go for it.

But be prepared for bureaucratic BS that has nothing to do with teaching your classes. Keep a sense of humor and do like I did for a couple of decades; go to the dumb meetings, pretend like you're listening to all the baloney about the "latest regulations" and then go back to your classroom, close the door, and teach those youngsters useful skills.

The public education dept in any state is a huge establishment that thrives on useless, counterproductive red tape.

It's just the nature of any large organization, really.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 08:46 AM
 
Location: Brentwood, Tennessee
43,145 posts, read 41,752,473 times
Reputation: 82856
It sounds like you are well prepared for the "shop" part but not at all prepared for the "teacher" part.

In addition to the bureaucracy mentioned, shop class and other similar vocational classes can be the most difficult to teach because of the safety and management concerns. Do you have good management experience? Classroom management is as important if not slightly more important than content because if you can't get the kids to shut up, sit down and listen to you, your shop skills won't matter.

Have you thought about looking at volunteer situations where your skills might be of use? Community centers? Nonprofits, etc?

I would go that route rather than teaching.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 10:25 AM
 
8,115 posts, read 8,616,186 times
Reputation: 9075
You might be better off teaching a continuing education course or community college. For public school teaching, you would need to be fingerprinted, background checks, and a bunch of courses about child abuse, anti-bullying and whatever else that would be required by your state education department.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 10:38 AM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
22,526 posts, read 39,903,732 times
Reputation: 23629
Quote:
Originally Posted by BirdieBelle View Post
It sounds like you are well prepared for the "shop" part but not at all prepared for the "teacher" part.

In addition to the bureaucracy mentioned, shop class and other similar vocational classes can be the most difficult to teach because of the safety and management concerns..... if you can't get the kids to shut up, sit down and listen to you, your shop skills won't matter.

Have you thought about looking at volunteer situations where your skills might be of use? Community centers? Nonprofits, etc?

I would go that route rather than teaching.
We are part of an international NGO that does 'skills-training' (including vocational) (Asia, Africa, and Europe). We volunteer at camps / schools in foreign countries.

I second the Continuing EDU and CC, as you are more apt to get students who want / need to learn.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 10:38 AM
 
429 posts, read 104,127 times
Reputation: 1026
Try community colleges and trade schools.
K-12 is a bureaucratic nightmare and many won't even entertain the idea of "part time".
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 11:27 AM
 
Location: east TN
265 posts, read 73,428 times
Reputation: 1024
Yeah....did that for a few years. Thought going in "I can really teach these kids some things".....don't know if they learned much, BUT I GOT A HECK OF AN EDUCATION !


Best of luck to ya......
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 11:32 AM
 
Location: North Beach, MD on the Chesapeake
33,876 posts, read 42,076,783 times
Reputation: 43276
You guys need to stop being so negative and discouraging him. Everyone knows that anybody can teach.

OP, like a couple others I think you might find more success looking at community colleges or post high school trade schools. Several different reasons, primarily because of the part time aspect and the fact that many systems have gotten rid of your courses in comprehensive high schools and shunted them over to Vo-Tech schools.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-10-2019, 12:59 PM
 
12,617 posts, read 28,088,396 times
Reputation: 7150
You can't teach in a school in Pennsylvania public school without being certified to teach, which generally means at least one more year in college in a certification class. I agree with the posters suggesting teaching an evening non-credit class at a local college or perhaps HS, would be way easier and just as fulfilling. Our local tech school will take qualified people to teach skills like carpentry, but even those people must get certified within the first couple of years and it takes quite a bit of in-service training to get up to speed with specific requirements that are state mandated.
__________________
Please follow THESE rules.

Any Questions on how to use this site? See this.

Realtors, See This.

Moderator - Lehigh Valley, NEPA, Harrisburg, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Education and Colleges and Universities.

When I post in bold red, that is Moderator action and per the TOS can be discussed only via Direct Message.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Education
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top