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Old 04-19-2023, 04:38 AM
 
Location: Pasadena,
1 posts, read 836 times
Reputation: 10

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Having online education at university can be difficult but CPTDog suggests you the best universities that has the best teaching staff no matter if its online or offline so that you won't have to face any such issues
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Old 05-07-2023, 11:47 PM
 
794 posts, read 522,415 times
Reputation: 2257
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportslover View Post
I’m just curious as to how online school differs from brick and mortar classrooms. Do you find online college to be more challenging than in person schooling ? Is it true that you are basically just teaching yourself what’s in your textbooks vs it actually being taught to you ?
My experience iwth online learnings is that I had a difficult time with the technology of interacting with the profiessors.


I was an engaged student when I attended university - I did a lot of inclass discussions, and questions. I also visited my professors during their office hours.


I really missed that with online classes. I had a difficult time posting questinos, and I rsequently missed responses, and hardly ever had a chance to do followup questions. Same with the other students' qustinos - I often lost track fo the discussion. I twas very frustrating.
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Old 06-14-2023, 05:21 AM
 
8,999 posts, read 13,726,288 times
Reputation: 9596
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikesparrow View Post
You might say that again for the first part, pal. But things are changing and nowadays for the best jobs, it's important to actually have the knowledge, not the degree. Hiring managers will properly test your knowledge and skills before you get the job. You might get away with only having a degree for the most common jobs, but if you want to get hired in a highly competitive company you're no good with just a degree. Having the knowledge always pays off!
How can you have the knowledge without having the degree?

Would you trust an unlicensed quack that has the knowledge but not the MD?
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Old 10-31-2023, 08:33 AM
 
22 posts, read 12,701 times
Reputation: 38
To be honest, I have mixed feelings about attending college or university online because, for me, online education is not that effective. It's so hard to concentrate on the information online, and in-person classes are for sure better.
Attending a college or university online is not necessarily the same as teaching yourself the material, but it can vary significantly depending on the institution, the course, and your own learning motivation. I think that your success depends primarily on you. And the format - online or offline doesn't matter. Educational institutions and professors provide you with information and tools, and you need to learn them and how to use them.
Online education is not the same as teaching yourself. It provides a structured learning environment with access to course materials, instructors, and a community of learners. However, your success in an online program may depend on your ability to stay motivated, manage your time effectively, and take an active role in your learning.
I can only speak about my experience because, as I said for me, studying online is hard. Now, I have one course online, and it takes me a lot of time to do tasks or to understand the material. But I know that it's my responsibility, so I spend a lot of time trying to understand everything. It's good that there are a lot of educational sources like https://edubirdie.com/examples/personal-narrative-essays/ which helped me a lot to understand what is the structure or such writing. Such sources with examples are a new discovery to me because when I asked my professor what I could do or read to understand the theory better, he provided me with some ideas, and the rest was up to me. So, I try to find ideas and inspirations and improve my own skills in such a way.
So to conclude, I can say that yes, format matters, but the most is motivation and dedication
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Old 11-02-2023, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Scottsdale
2,066 posts, read 1,605,760 times
Reputation: 4040
Quote:
Originally Posted by sportslover View Post
I’m just curious as to how online school differs from brick and mortar classrooms. Do you find online college to be more challenging than in person schooling ? Is it true that you are basically just teaching yourself what’s in your textbooks vs it actually being taught to you ?
I have taken many online classes at the undergradate and graduate level at major STEM universities. I have also taken online courses at smaller community colleges or smaller in-state universities (non-flagship). Regardless, the common features are:
* video lectures - can view when you have time in the week (ideally same day it was posted)
* online discussion forums with students and instructors/TAs
* notes and books to download or checkout from online library (e.g. pdf articles, book, notes).
* graded homework (often weekly or biweekly)
* graded projects (paper, coding, enginering, etc) - could be one or more
* graded exams (could be proctored or online)
* graded quizzes (some courses have quizzes weekly or biweekly - some do not)

In general, the courses give the prerequisites and schedule. I'd say for STEM many students have trouble keeping up. It's very common for students to ignore review of videos until a few days before major exams. It's also common for students to start assignments late or miss weekly quizzes.

The commonality is that the user interaction with the dashboard (website) is recorded. If you don't log in for a week and do not download homework or click on links for videos, the website has statistical data recorded for those interactions. The instructors can see the data on usage. So, they can tell if you are an active student or inactive for days or weeks at a time. This will factor in their empathy and flexibility on grading.

Common Issue:
I have seen fierce arguments and misunderstandings occur on online forums among students or between students and professors. A root cause is that the person's vocal tone, facial expressions, and nonverbal gestures are often not available for analysis during discussions. All the other person can see is your text, and at times in a misunderstanding the other party can take it grossly out-of-context. That can lead to an internet flaming session. I literally dropped one online course in Florida because my project team fell apart due to arguments. In another situation, I had used the word "flaw" on a minor detail of a lecture note, and the instructor thought it was the most unacceptable insult in history beyond acceptability. If he had talked to me in person, he would haven known there was no intent on castigation with the use of that word. So, the internet is limited in communication. Enrollees should be aware of that - but a lot of learning can still be done. The work output and rigor are high and legitimate - even for community colleges. Online degrees are valid and earned with sincere effort.
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Old 11-05-2023, 04:07 AM
 
Location: NJ
23,755 posts, read 33,099,698 times
Reputation: 30551
Quote:
Originally Posted by grad_student200 View Post
I have taken many online classes at the undergradate and graduate level at major STEM universities. I have also taken online courses at smaller community colleges or smaller in-state universities (non-flagship). Regardless, the common features are:
* video lectures - can view when you have time in the week (ideally same day it was posted)
* online discussion forums with students and instructors/TAs
* notes and books to download or checkout from online library (e.g. pdf articles, book, notes).
* graded homework (often weekly or biweekly)
* graded projects (paper, coding, enginering, etc) - could be one or more
* graded exams (could be proctored or online)
* graded quizzes (some courses have quizzes weekly or biweekly - some do not)

In general, the courses give the prerequisites and schedule. I'd say for STEM many students have trouble keeping up. It's very common for students to ignore review of videos until a few days before major exams. It's also common for students to start assignments late or miss weekly quizzes.

The commonality is that the user interaction with the dashboard (website) is recorded. If you don't log in for a week and do not download homework or click on links for videos, the website has statistical data recorded for those interactions. The instructors can see the data on usage. So, they can tell if you are an active student or inactive for days or weeks at a time. This will factor in their empathy and flexibility on grading.

Common Issue:
I have seen fierce arguments and misunderstandings occur on online forums among students or between students and professors. A root cause is that the person's vocal tone, facial expressions, and nonverbal gestures are often not available for analysis during discussions. All the other person can see is your text, and at times in a misunderstanding the other party can take it grossly out-of-context. That can lead to an internet flaming session. I literally dropped one online course in Florida because my project team fell apart due to arguments. In another situation, I had used the word "flaw" on a minor detail of a lecture note, and the instructor thought it was the most unacceptable insult in history beyond acceptability. If he had talked to me in person, he would haven known there was no intent on castigation with the use of that word. So, the internet is limited in communication. Enrollees should be aware of that - but a lot of learning can still be done. The work output and rigor are high and legitimate - even for community colleges. Online degrees are valid and earned with sincere effort.


My hub started doing a manager course through an online university. It was funded by Walmart/Sam's club. I don't recall what online college he used.

He was doing ok when he first started it, then week two or so, it just got to be too much that he had to do. He had to post in an online discussion site, he had to post what he got out of it, plus they were supposed to read through their classmates posts, reply to them to give feedback.

I don't know if they're all like that, it took up a lot of his time when he was not working on his two days off. He was doing it just to do something, plus it was free from his job.

He ended up doing something different at work instead of being a manager, he's trained on every fork lift, he loves working on the dock. He's still debating being a team lead whenever an opening comes up, I personally would not do it at his age. I don't see him working many more years. He's been retired from his main job for almost two years.
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Old 11-05-2023, 09:40 AM
 
12,514 posts, read 8,731,743 times
Reputation: 34276
Quote:
Originally Posted by Roselvr View Post
My hub started doing a manager course through an online university. It was funded by Walmart/Sam's club. I don't recall what online college he used.

He was doing ok when he first started it, then week two or so, it just got to be too much that he had to do. He had to post in an online discussion site, he had to post what he got out of it, plus they were supposed to read through their classmates posts, reply to them to give feedback.

I don't know if they're all like that, it took up a lot of his time when he was not working on his two days off. He was doing it just to do something, plus it was free from his job.

He ended up doing something different at work instead of being a manager, he's trained on every fork lift, he loves working on the dock. He's still debating being a team lead whenever an opening comes up, I personally would not do it at his age. I don't see him working many more years. He's been retired from his main job for almost two years.
I've done a couple of online programs. These programs were the same classes as if you'd been on campus. On the one hand you were getting the same material as if you were in class. On the other hand, the biggest drawback I felt was the lack of immediate back and forth with the professor and class. If you miss a key point, you email the professor. The best case is the next day is a workday, so you see a response the following evening when you log into Blackboard. Often the response was something like "several people had that question, and we'll discuss it at our weekly telecon." Now you're a week behind and it snowballs from there. We had a very large percentage of the online class drop because they got behind early on and could never catch up.
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