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Old 09-01-2022, 07:12 AM
 
315 posts, read 145,295 times
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I graduated college in 2005 and back then we had paper books and few online assignments and no online tests. Tests were graded with scantrons. What is it like today? Is everything digital? Does everyone have a computer in the class room? Are assignments online?
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Old 09-01-2022, 09:48 AM
 
Location: ☀️ SFL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,647 posts, read 3,122,515 times
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Compare it to 40, 50 years ago. We had to actually learn math, no calculators allowed. We also had to learn cursive writing, I don't know if you did or not, but I've heard the kids today don't learn it. We were taught to read by Phonics. We also failed if we couldn't read, none of that "no child left behind."

We also had Art class, and Music class. We were allowed to choose an instrument if we liked music enough, and then our parents could hire a teacher/tutor for after-school practice. We were taught to read music, not all of us did, but it was offered.

We learned much of Shakespeare through books and plays on our schools' stage. We had to read many classic books and do book reports on each of them, starting in 5th grade.

I think you guys still do field trips to the local museums and parks, right?

But kids today learn computer and the digital world. Computers were stuff for NASA when I was a kid. To learn anything computer, I had to have my wife teach me, whose 7 years younger and taught herself by getting a computer and stumbling around with it. She can write code and other things I know nothing about. Got to keep up with the times.

Last edited by TerraDown; 09-01-2022 at 10:44 AM..
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Old 09-01-2022, 12:45 PM
 
Location: We_tside PNW (Columbia Gorge) / CO / SA TX / Thailand
31,457 posts, read 51,904,192 times
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What is school like today compared to 20 years ago?

It's a breeze!

Isn't that what it's supposed to be?

Quote:
I think you guys still do field trips to the local museums and parks, right?
Yes!!! International field trips, with a speck of educational content included to meet requirements
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Old 09-04-2022, 02:42 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,589 posts, read 97,046,108 times
Reputation: 109943
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
Compare it to 40, 50 years ago. We had to actually learn math, no calculators allowed. We also had to learn cursive writing, I don't know if you did or not, but I've heard the kids today don't learn it. We were taught to read by Phonics. We also failed if we couldn't read, none of that "no child left behind."
The bolded depended on the state. Some states did not offer phonics in the schools. Kids were promoted whether they learned to read or not. Speaking of the experience of older relatives who went through school 50-60 years ago, and their kids, also, who experienced the same a generation later. Schools did not teach grammar, not then, and not now or anytime in-between.

The one thing that's improved is, that now they teach kids how to read and understand literature. They teach "literary analysis" in highschool, so students learn how to look for certain elements or motifs in a novel that point toward symbolic elements and what they signify. That did not exist prior to the 90's. A lot of students were lost in literature class, having no idea what was going on, or why they had to read stories of graphic violence and trauma. Teachers didn't used to consider the age-appropriateness of the novels they chose; they picked titles from a list of "great books", or literature by acclaimed new authors as if checking boxes on a list. I hope they put more thought into their selections, nowadays.

The college literature class I took taught us that the whole business of reading symbolic meanings into novels was completely random and arbitrary anyway; you could make up any interpretation you wanted, and as long as you could defend it credibly, you win. The clear message was, that there was no rhyme or reason to supposed hidden symbolism or meaning in fictional works.

Times have changed with regard to how literature is taught, mercifully.
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Old 09-04-2022, 04:52 PM
 
10,895 posts, read 6,988,743 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
The bolded depended on the state. Some states did not offer phonics in the schools. Kids were promoted whether they learned to read or not. Speaking of the experience of older relatives who went through school 50-60 years ago, and their kids, also, who experienced the same a generation later. Schools did not teach grammar, not then, and not now or anytime in-between.

The one thing that's improved is, that now they teach kids how to read and understand literature. They teach "literary analysis" in highschool, so students learn how to look for certain elements or motifs in a novel that point toward symbolic elements and what they signify. That did not exist prior to the 90's. A lot of students were lost in literature class, having no idea what was going on, or why they had to read stories of graphic violence and trauma. Teachers didn't used to consider the age-appropriateness of the novels they chose; they picked titles from a list of "great books", or literature by acclaimed new authors as if checking boxes on a list. I hope they put more thought into their selections, nowadays.

The college literature class I took taught us that the whole business of reading symbolic meanings into novels was completely random and arbitrary anyway; you could make up any interpretation you wanted, and as long as you could defend it credibly, you win. The clear message was, that there was no rhyme or reason to supposed hidden symbolism or meaning in fictional works.

Times have changed with regard to how literature is taught, mercifully.
I would say they taught grammar in English and analysis in lit back when I was in high school and college. Whether they taught it well is a completely different question. As for literary analysis, there is a right answer to the hidden symbolism in poems and literature -- whatever symbolism the teacher/professor wanted. Any other answer was wrong and could not be defended. Number one lesson in most literature, history, and similar classes, tell the teacher what they want to hear.
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Old 09-04-2022, 04:59 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,589 posts, read 97,046,108 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tnff View Post
I would say they taught grammar in English and analysis in lit back when I was in high school and college. Whether they taught it well is a completely different question. As for literary analysis, there is a right answer to the hidden symbolism in poems and literature -- whatever symbolism the teacher/professor wanted. Any other answer was wrong and could not be defended. Number one lesson in most literature, history, and similar classes, tell the teacher what they want to hear.
Wow. So much for teaching kids to think for themselves!
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Old 09-04-2022, 05:23 PM
 
Location: ☀️ SFL (hell for me-wife loves it)
3,647 posts, read 3,122,515 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ruth4Truth View Post
...The one thing that's improved is, that now they teach kids how to read and understand literature. They teach "literary analysis" in highschool, so students learn how to look for certain elements or motifs in a novel that point toward symbolic elements and what they signify. That did not exist prior to the 90's. A lot of students were lost in literature class, having no idea what was going on, or why they had to read stories of graphic violence and trauma. Teachers didn't used to consider the age-appropriateness of the novels they chose; they picked titles from a list of "great books", or literature by acclaimed new authors as if checking boxes on a list. I hope they put more thought into their selections, nowadays....
Times have changed with regard to how literature is taught, mercifully.
We were taught how to understand literature. And the classic novels we were given to read were age appropriate. I don't remember getting one book assignment that was over my head.
We were taught critical thinking, and had debate class. Grammar was a separate class than basic English.
I'm obviously not in school anymore, nor was I a teacher, but I thought they did a wonderful job of educating us. We were even taught some basic latin to help us understand scientific words and why they were the way they were (dead language, perfect for such use)

edit: I guess some states are catching on to why it's important to be able to read before moving on: https://www.city-data.com/forum/educ...-pass-3rd.html

Last edited by TerraDown; 09-04-2022 at 05:40 PM..
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Old 09-04-2022, 06:08 PM
 
Location: State of Transition
98,589 posts, read 97,046,108 times
Reputation: 109943
Quote:
Originally Posted by TerraDown View Post
We were taught how to understand literature. And the classic novels we were given to read were age appropriate. I don't remember getting one book assignment that was over my head.
We were taught critical thinking, and had debate class. Grammar was a separate class than basic English.
I'm obviously not in school anymore, nor was I a teacher, but I thought they did a wonderful job of educating us. We were even taught some basic latin to help us understand scientific words and why they were the way they were (dead language, perfect for such use)

edit: I guess some states are catching on to why it's important to be able to read before moving on: https://www.city-data.com/forum/educ...-pass-3rd.html
I'm dying to know what state you went through grade school and highschool in, that prepared you so well!

What is "basic English" if not grammar? What does "basic English" mean? What did that class cover? And was literature a separate course? Or was "basic English" gradeschool reading, and literature was in highschool (or starting in middle school/junior high)?

Latin was available in highschool as a program of its own.
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Old 09-04-2022, 07:36 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte FL
3,349 posts, read 1,686,838 times
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today?...vaping and tik toc on their phones...cussing like a sailor..

20 years ago?...cussing like a sailor...

40 years ago?...kids still had a modicum of respect for each other and adults...

society has gone to hell in a hand bag...
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Old 09-04-2022, 09:52 PM
 
876 posts, read 514,738 times
Reputation: 1504
#2 pencil
3 ring binder
college rule paper
library card
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